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HISTORY 

OF 

BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

IOWA 

AND  ITS  PEOPLE 


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BIOGRAPHICAL 


FERDINAND  E.  CUTLER. 

Ferdinand  E.  Cutler  is  the  president  of  the  Cutler  Hardware  Company,  one 
of  the  leading  wholesale  establishments  of  Waterloo.  He  occupied  a  prominent 
position  among  the  enterprising,  alert  and  progressive  business  men  of  the  city, 
in  which  he  has  made  his  home  for  forty-eight  years,  or  since  1866.  He  was 
born  in  Canada  and  during  his  early  childhood  his  parents  removed  with  their 
family  to  Lockport,  New  York,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated.  He  removed 
from  that  city  to  Iowa  and,  establishing  his  home  in  Waterloo,  became  one  of 
the  early  merchants  of  Black  Hawk  county.  Here  he  engaged  in  the  grocery  and 
hardware  business  as  junior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Weatherwax  &  Cutler.  That 
relation  was  maintained  for  several  years,  but  in  1871,  Mr.  Cutler  sold  out,  in 
order  to  organize  the  firm  of  Crittenden  &  Cutler,  dealing  exclusively  in  hard- 
ware. A  change  in  the  partnership  in  1873  led  to  the  adoption  of  the  firm  style 
of  Cutler  &  Parker  and  this  was  continued  until  the  incorporation  of  the  business 
in  1891  under  the  name  of  Cutler  Hardware  Company.  Through  all  these  years 
Mr.  Cutler  was  the  active  and  managing  partner  of  the  business  and  when  the 
company  was  incorporated  in  1891  he  became  the  president  and  now  is  the  prin- 
cipal owner  of  the  plant.  The  business  was  capitalized  for  twenty-four  thousand 
four  hundred  dollars  and  in  the  early  period  trade  was  conducted  only  along  re- 
tail lines,  but  soon  after  the  incorporation  they  began  a  wholesale  business  on  a 
small  scale.  Their  patronage  in  that  direction  increased  so  rapidly  that  in  1901 
they  discontinued  the  retail  business  and  since  then  have  conducted  an  exclusive 
wholesale  hardware  establishment.  In  1910  they  erected  their  present  business 
block,  which  is  sixty  by  one  hundred  and  forty  feet  and  is  five  stories  in  height. 
The  building  has  been  constructed  with  so  broad  a  frame  and  foundation  that 
two  more  stories  can  be  added  if  necessary  and  is  especially  arranged  for  their 
business  with  an  eye  to  convenience.  This  building  is  constructed  of  steel  and 
cement  throughout  and  is  practically  the  only  true  fireproof  building  in  the  state 
of  Iowa.  They  now  employ  about  thirty-five  people,  while  their  trade  covers 
Iowa  and  southern  Minnesota.  The  capital  stock  and  surplus  at  the  present  time 
is  one  hundred  and  seventy-five  thousand  dollars — a  fact  indicative  of  the  con- 
tinued growth  and  prosperity  of  the  enterprise.  Mr.  Cutler  as  the  founder  and 
active  head  of  the  business  deserves  great  credit  for  building  up  this  important 
commercial  undertaking,  which  ranks  among  the  foremost  wholesale  mercantile 
interests  of  Waterloo.  Something  of  his  high  standing  in  business  circles  is  in- 
dicated in  the  fact  that  he  was  honored  with  the  presidency  of  the  Iowa  State 
Hardware  Jobbers'  Association  for  three  or  four  years.     Mr.  Cutler  was  one  of 

5 


6  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

the  founders  of  this  organization.  For  the  past  three  years,  also,  he  has  been 
on  the  membership  committee  of  the  National  Hardware  Jobbers'  Association. 
He  is  widely  known  in  trade  circles  and  his  business  ability  and  personal  worth 
have  gained  him  high  regard. 

In  matters  of  citizenship  Mr.  Cutler  has  ever  manifested  a  deep  and  helpful 
interest.  He  was  a  member  of  the  first  city  council  of  Waterloo  following  the 
incorporation  of  the  city  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  two  terms.  Mr.  Cutler 
has  since  respectfully  declined  to  accept  the  oflfers  of  numerous  political  positions. 
He  is  most  helpfully  and  heartily  interested  in  all  enterprises  for  the  betterment 
of  Waterloo,  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of 
Trade  and  for  fourteen  years  acted  as  its  president,  covering  the  period  of  the 
greatest  growth  of  Waterloo.  He  instituted  many  plans  and  measures  which  were 
directly  resultant  in  bringing  about  the  growth  and  improvement  of  the  city  and 
the  extension  of  its  trade  connections.  He  resigned  about  three  years  ago  to  the 
deep  regret  of  many,  for  his  worth  was  most  widely  recognized.  He  was  presi- 
dent of  the  Humane  Society  following  its  organization  and  has  been  chairman 
of  the  board  of  trustees  since  the  time  the  Universalist  church  erected  its  present 
house  of  worship.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  and  helpful  interest  in  church 
work  and,  in  fact,  his  influence  is  ever  on  the  side  of  advancement  and  improve- 
ment along  intellectual,  material,  social  and  moral  lines.  Fraternally  he  is  con- 
nected with  the  Masons.  He  occupies  a  fine  home  in  Highland  and  he  enjoys 
the  high  regard  and  respect  of  his  fellow  townsmen,  for  his  life  has  at  all  times 
commended  him  to  the  confidence  and  good  will  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been 
associated,  while  his  ability  and  public  spirit  have  brought  him  prominently  before 
the  people  at  large. 


JOHN  H.  STEWART. 


John  H.  Stewart,  vice  president,  treasurer  and  manager  of  the  Cement  Tile 
Machinery  Company,  finds  in  laudable  ambition  the  incentive  for  his  persistent 
and  indefatigable  effort  which,  intelligently  directed,  is  leading  him  continually 
toward  the  goal  of  success.  He  was  born  in  Vermont  in  1862  and  when  thirteen 
years  of  age  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  westward  removal  to  Iowa,  the 
family  home  being  established  in  Winnebago  county,  where  John  H.  Stewart  was 
reared  to  manhood  and  attended  school.  His  advantages  were  somewhat  limited, 
however,  because  of  the  comparatively  undeveloped  system  of  education  at  that 
early  day.  When  a  youth  of  but  sixteen  years  he  and  his  brother  began  drilling 
wells  and  he  followed  that  pursuit  for  three  years,  after  which  he  learned  the 
carpenter's  trade.  He  was  employed  at  the  trade  for  three  years  and  then  began 
contracting  and  building  on  his  own  account. 

In  1898  Mr.  Stewart  removed  to  Waterloo,  where  he  became  prominent  in 
business  in  contracting  and  architectural  work,  ultimately,  however,  confining  his 
attention  and  activities  to  the  latter.  The  last  work  he  did  of  that  character  was 
in  drawing  the  plans  for  the  Ellis  Hotel.  He  had  been  accorded  a  liberal  pat- 
ronage and  had  made  for  himself  a  creditable  position  in  that  field  of  labor,  but 
in  1905  he  turned  his  attention  to  other  interests,  organizing  the  Cement  Tile 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  7 

Machinery  Company.  Three  years  before,  or  in  1902,  he  got  out  a  patent  for  a 
cement  block  machine,  but  later  sold  his  interest  therein  and  in  1905  he  organized 
the  Cement  Tile  Machinery  Company,  which  was  incorporated  in  that  year  and 
capitalized  for  thirty  thousand  dollars.  Something  of  the  growth  and  importance 
of  the  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  the  capital  stock  has  been  increased 
to  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  thousand  dollars,  of  which  eighty  thousand  dol- 
lars has  been  paid  up.  The  present  officers  are:  J.  M.  Schenk,  president;  J.  H. 
Stewart,  vice  president,  treasurer  and  manager ;  and  H.  A.  Sharp,  secretary.  In 
1906  the  company  began  erecting  its  present  plant,  containing  thirty-two  thou- 
sand square  feet  of  floor  space,  and  they  have  from  twenty-five  to  fifty  employes. 
Their  business  has  gradually  grown  along  substantial  lines  and  their  output  has 
a  wide  sale.  Mr.  Stewart  is  also  president  of  the  Cement  Products  Company 
and  is  thus  an  active  factor  in  industrial  circles  of  the  city.  His  business  methods 
have  been  thoroughly  reliable  and  he  has  earned  for  himself  an  enviable  reputa- 
tion as  a  careful  man  of  business,  being  known  in  his  dealings  for  his  prompt 
and  honorable  methods,  which  have  won  him  the  deserved  and  unbounded  con- 
fidence of  his  fellowmen. 

In  1884,  Mr.  Stewart  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ella  Allen,  of  Mankato, 
Minnesota,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  six  children :  W.  H.,  A.  A., 
Nina  C,  Mildred  V.,  Naomi  and  Russell.  The  eldest  daughter,  Nina,  is  now  the 
wife  of  Clarence  Basserear,  of  Waterloo,  and  Mildred  is  now  Mrs.  Fred  Bartz. 
Mr.  Stewart  is  a  Mason  and  exemplifies  in  his  life  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the 
craft.  He  has  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  his 
name  is  also  on  the  membership  roll  of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  His  time  and 
attention  have  been  given  mostly  to  his  business  affairs  and  his  close  application 
and  excellent  management  have  brought  to  him  the  substantial  degree  of  pros- 
perity which  is  today  his.  He  is  a  man  of  resolute  purpose,  courage  and  industry, 
and  his  record  proves  that  prosperity  and  an  honorable  name  may  be  won 
simultaneously. 


HOPE  C.  MARTIN. 


Hope  C.  Martin,  a  wholesale  and  retail  dealer  in  cigars  and  tobacco  at  Water- 
loo, is  a  native  of  the  city  which  is  still  his  home,  born  in  1875.  His  father, 
Henry  Martin,  was  a  native  of  New  Hampshire  and  about  1868  became  a  resi- 
dent of  Black  Hawk  county,  casting  in  his  lot  with  the  early  settlers.  For  an 
extended  period  he  was  engaged  in  the  bakery  business  and  was  a  leading 
factor  in  the  material  development  of  city  and  county  in  the  early  days.  He  died 
about  twenty-four  years  ago  and  his  demise  was  the  occasion  of  deep  and  wide- 
spread regret,  for  all  who  knew  him  recognized  his  worth  and  felt  that  the 
county  suffered  a  loss  in  his  passing.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Margaret  Martin,  was  a 
native  of  Halifax  but  came  from  Boston,  Massachusetts,  to  Waterloo.  She  was 
called  from  this  life  twelve  years  ago. 

Hope  C.  Martin  acquired  a  public-school  education.  He  became  clerk  of  the 
Logan  hotel  and  in  1897  he  established  a  cigar  stand  in  the  hotel.  Afterward  he 
opened  a  wholesale  and  retail  cigar  business  on  Water  street,  where  he  remained 


8  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

until  his  stock  was  destroyed  by  fire.  With  characteristic  energy,  however,  he 
immediately  started  again,  opening  his  store  in  the  Logan  House  block,  and 
when  that  property  was  purchased  by  James  Black  he  removed  to  his  present 
location  at  No.  211  East  Fourth  street,  having  purchased  this  property  for  a 
permanent  home  for  his  wholesale  and  retail  business.  He  is  now  conducting  an 
extensive  business,  being  a  distributor  of  the  best  selling  brands  of  tobacco  and 
cigars  handled  in  the  western  markets.  He  has  agencies  in  many  of  the  cities  of 
Iowa,  South  Dakota  and  Illinois  and  has  built  up  a  business  of  extensive  and 
gratifying  proportions.  He  has  now  altogether  thirty -two  agencies,  cigar  stores 
and  news  stands  in  operation  in  Iowa,  Illinois,  Minnesota  and  the  Dakotas  and 
is  represented  upon  the  road  by  five  traveling  salesmen.  The  business  has 
grown  year  by  year  until  it  is  of  extensive  proportions  and  Mr.  Martin  is 
therefore  accounted  one  of  the  leading  merchants  of  his  city.  He  is  also  largely 
interested  in  a  number  of  good  real-estate  properties  in  Waterloo,  including  the 
Princess  Theater  and  the  Hotel  Martin. 

Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mayme  A.  Baro,  of  Waterloo, 
and  they  have  one  daughter,  Fay  Dorothy.  That  Mr.  Martin  has  attained  high 
rank  in  Masonry  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  now  a  Mystic  Shriner.  He  is 
also  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  has  member- 
ship in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  he  was  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  In  politics  he  is  a  democrat,  well  versed  on  the  ques- 
tions and  issues  of  the  day,  and  he  has  served  as  chairman  of  the  county  central 
committee.  One  meeting  him  at  once  recognizes  that  he  is  a  most  energetic  man, 
alert,  determined  and  resourceful.  While  he  has  never  sought  to  figure  person- 
ally before  the  public  in  any  light  or  any  relation,  his  influence  has  been  felt  as 
a  strong,  steady,  moving  force  in  the  business  and  civic  development  of  the  city. 


L.  A.  KNITTEL. 


L.  A.  Knittel  has  since  1899  been  connected  with  the  Waterloo  Fruit  &  Com- 
mission Company,  of  which  he  is  now  the  president.  Advancement  has  come 
to  him  in  recognition  of  merit  and  ability  and  today  as  chief  executive  officer 
of  the  company  he  is  in  control  of  a  large  and  substantial  business  that  long  since 
reached  gratifying  proportions.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Dubuque,  Iowa,  born  May 
18,  1862,  his  parents  being  John  and  Mary  (Fettkether)  Knittel,  the  former  a 
native  of  Germany  and  the  latter  of  Dubuque.  After  living  for  a  period  of  years 
in  her  native  city  they  removed  to  Bremer  county  about  1871  and  for  an  ex- 
tended period  the  father  was  identified  with  mercantile  pursuits  in  the  town  of 
Knittel,  which  had  been  so  named  in  his  honor.  He  was  a  progressive  and  rep- 
resentative business  man  of  his  community  and  when  he  passed  away  in  1913  his 
death  was  the  occasion  of  deep  and  sincere  regret.    His  widow  still  survives. 

L.  A.  Knittel  had  an  excellent  home  training  in  those  lines  which  make  for 
upright  character,  while  mental  discipline  came  to  him  in  his  public-school  educa- 
tion, which  was  supplemented  by  a  business  course  in  Bailey's  Commercial  College 
at  Dubuque.  Me  then  became  connected  with  mercantile  interests  in  the  village 
of  Knittel  and  while  thus  engaged  was  appointed  postmaster  of  the  little  town, 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  9 

the  third  assistant  postmaster  of  the  United  States  giving  the  family  name  to  the 
postoffice.  L.  A.  Knittel  continued  in  business  there  for  three  and  one-half  years 
and  at  the  end  of  that  time  went  upon  the  road  for  Albert  Holzer,  who  was  the 
owner  of  a  commission  business  which  later  became  the  Waterloo  Fruit  &  Com- 
mission Company.  He  represented  Mr.  Holzer  for  twelve  years  and  gained  for 
him  a  liberal  and  gratifying  patronage.  In  1899  the  Waterloo  Fruit  &  Commis- 
sion Company  was  organized,  taking  over  the  business  of  Mr.  Holzer,  and  at  that 
time  Mr.  Knittel  became  a  member  of  the  firm  and  was  elected  one  of  the  directors 
of  the  new  company.  Two  years  later  he  was  elected  president  and  has  since 
continued  in  that  capacity.  His  previous  long  experience  with  the  trade  made 
him  thoroughly  qualified  to  become  an  executive  officer  and  the  keen  interest 
and  sagacity  which  he  manifests  in  the  direction  of  the  business  are  factors  in 
its  growing  and  substantial  success. 

In  December,  1886,  Mr.  Knittel  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lena  Tegt- 
meier,  of  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  and, they  have  become  the  parents  of  six  children, 
of  whom  four  are  yet  living:  Horace  C,  who  is  city  shipping  clerk  with  the 
Waterloo  Fruit  &  Commission  Company;  Esther  M.,  a  student  in  the  State  Normal 
school  at  Cedar  Falls ;  and  Louis  C.  and  Ruth  C,  who  are  attending  the  public 
•schools. 

Mr.  Knittel  holds  membership  in  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.,  and  also  with 
the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  the  Commercial  Club  and  the  Town 
Criers  Club  of  Waterloo.  He  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church 
and  they  enjoy  the  high  respect  of  all  who  know  them,  their  sterling  qualities 
gaining  for  them  high  regard.  Mr.  Knittel  devotes  his  time  almost  exclusively  to 
his  business,  and  his  concentration  of  purpose,  his  close  application  and  his  well- 
defined  spirit  of  enterprise  are  the  elements  in  his  substantial  success. 


IRA  W.  BLOUGH. 


Waterloo,  strong,  aggressive  and  growing  rapidly,  has  furnished  a  fruitful 
field  for  the  establishment  and  conduct  of  important  business  interests,  which  in 
turn  have  acted  as  a  boomerang  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  city.  Prominent  among 
the  well-known  representatives  of  financial  interests  is  Ira  W.  Blough,  cashier  of 
the  Iowa  State  Bank.  He  is  a  young  man,  having  just  completed  his  third  decade, 
his  birth  having  occurred  in  Black  Hawk  county  in  1884.  He  is  a  son  of  W.  A. 
Blough,  of  Waterloo,  who  was  born  in  Lanark,  Illinois,  and  in  his  childhood  was 
brought  to  this  county  by  his  parents  in  i860.  His  father  was  A.  J.  Blough,  one 
of  the  pioneer  dentists  of  Waterloo.  On  reaching  young  manhood  W.  A.  Blough 
chose  farming  as  a  vocation  and  was  engaged  in  general  agricultural  pursuits  and 
stock-raising  in  Orange  township  until  he  retired  from  active  business  life  and 
took  up  his  abode  in  the  county  seat,  where  he  has  resided  continuously  since 
1910 — one  of  the  worthy  and  highly  respected  residents  of  this  city. 

Spending  his  youthful  days  upon  the  old  home  farm,  Ira  W.  Blough  was 
educated  in  the  schools  of  Orange  township  and  also  spent  several  terms  in  the 
Mount  Morris  College  at  Mount  Morris,  Illinois.  He  then  returned  to  the  home 
farm  and  devoted  the  succeeding  two  years  to  the  work  of  the  fields.    At  the  end 


10 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 


of  that  time,  however,  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  became  associated  with  the  Iowa 
State  Bank  as  collector.  By  diligent  service,  trustworthiness  and  ability  he  has 
won  promotion  from  time  to  time  until  he  has  passed  through  all  the  intermedi- 
ate positions  to  that  of  cashier,  in  which  capacity  he  has  served  since  1912.  He 
is  a  popular  and  obliging  official,  ever  courteous  to  the  patrons  of  the  bank,  ex- 
tending favors  wherever  possible,  and  at  the  same  time  he  is  most  loyal  to  the 
interes*ts  of  the  institution  and  careful  in  safeguarding  its  ;business  stability. 

In  19 1 2  Mr.  Blough  was  married  to  Miss  Alta  Rodamar.  a  daughter  of  Ben- 
jamin Rodamar,  one  of  the  early  residents  of  Black  Hawk  county,  of  whom  men- 
tion is  made  elsewhere  in  this  work.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Blough  have  one  child, 
Mary  Jean.  They  are  members  of  the  Church  of  the  Brethren  and  Mr.  Blough's 
interest  in  community  affairs  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  a  member  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  the  Waterloo  Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club.  His 
entire  life  has  been  spent  in  this  county,  where  he  is  widely  and  favorably  known, 
and  few  of  the  young  men  of  Waterloo  have  a  broader  acquaintance  or  are  held 
in  higher  esteem  than  is  Ira  W.  Blough. 


HON.  ?IENRY  O.  BERNBROCK. 

The  sentiment  is  rapidly  growing  that  practical  business  men.  capable  of 
understanding  and  handling  affairs  of  importance,  should  have  control  of  the  laws 
which  regulate  trade  conditions  and  affect  the  general  interests  of  society.  More 
and  more  business  men  who  have  proven  their  worth  as  factors  in  the  business 
world  are  being  called  to  direct  and  shape  legislation  and  mark  out  the  policy 
of  city,  state  and  nation.  As  such  a  man  the  Hon.  Henry  O.  Bernbrock  is  well 
known  and  at  the  present  writing  is  the  representative  of  his  district  in  the  gen- 
eral assembly  of  Iowa,  to  which  position  he  was  elected  on  the  republican  ticket. 
His  connection  with  the  industrial  life  of  Waterloo  is  that  of  president  of  the 
Waterloo  Laundry  Company  and  president  of  the  Model  Laundry  Company, 
and  in  those  capacities  he  has  carefully  developed  and  systematized  his  business. 
He  dates  his  residence  in  Waterloo  from  March,  1902. 

Mr.  Bernbrock  was  born  in  Quincy,  Illinois,  February  12,  1874,  and  pursued 
his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  that  city  and  in  St.  Brancis  College.  When 
sixteen  years  of  age  he  entered  into  active  connection  with  the  laundry  business 
in  Chicago,  where  he  remained  for  about  two  years  and  then  returned  to  Quincy, 
where  he  became  connected  with  the  Weems  Laundry  Company,  controlling  one 
of  the  most  extensive  laundries  of  the  middle  west.  About  1897  l"*^  became  a 
])artner  in  the  Weems  Laundry  at  Springfield,  Illinois,  and  there  remained  until 
1902,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  purchased  an  interest  in  the  Waterloo 
Steam  Laundry.  In  August  of  the  same  year  he  bought  out  his  partner  and 
since  that  time  has  been  at  the  head  of  the  business.  At  intervals,  however,  he 
has  been  associated  with  partners.  On  the  29th  of  June,  1914,  the  business  was 
incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  Waterloo  Laundry  Company  with  Mr.  Bern- 
brock as  the  president  and  A.  J.  Cornwell  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  Broaden- 
ing the  .scope  of  his  activities,  he  is  now  also  the  president  of  the  Model  Laundry 
Company  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Home  Building  & 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  13 

Loan  Association.  Prosperity  has  attended  his  efforts  during  the  period  of  his 
residence  in  this  city  and  with  faith  in  its  future  he  has  invested  quite  extensively 
in  real  estate  in  Waterloo  and  is  now  the  owner  of  much  valuable  property. 

On  the  1 8th  of  February,  1910,  Mr.  Bernbrock  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Jean  Marcham,  of  Waterloo,  and  they  reside  at  No.  709  South  street. 
They  are  members  of  the  Sacred  Heart  Roman  Catholic  church  and  Mr.  Bern- 
brock  holds  membership  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is 
also  a  member  and  director  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Commercial  Club 
and  the  Town  Criers  Ciub  and  is  actively  and  helpfully  interested  in  all  move- 
ments for  the  upbuilding  of  Waterloo  and  the  uplift  of  her  citizenship.  His  life 
record  serves  to  indicate  what  may  be  accomplished  in  a  business  way  when  there 
is  the  will  to  dare  and  to  do,  for  obstacles  and  difficulties  can  always  be  overcome 
by  persistent,  earnest,  indefatigable  and  honorable  effort. 


CONRAD  D.  WANGLER. 

Conrad  D.  Wangler  was  a  pioneer  druggist  of  Waterloo  and  for  many  years 
one  of  the  prominent,  representative  and  successful  business  men  of  the  city, 
but  commercial  interests  indicated  but  one  phase  of  his  existence.  Whenever  aid 
was  needed  in  public  affairs,  whenever  a  worthy  individual  sought  his  help, 
assistance  was  freely  and  generously  given  and  thus  in  many  ways  he  left  the 
impress  of  his  life  for  good  upon  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  community 
in  which  he  lived. 

A  native  of  Germany,  Conrad  D.  Wangler  was  born  in  Baden  on  the  8th  of 
January,  185 1,  his  parents  being  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Conrad  Wangler,  who  always  re- 
mained residents  of  the  fatherland.  The  subject  of  this  review,  however,  left 
Germany  when  a  youth  of  fifteen  years.  He  had  already  acquired  a  mastery  of 
the  preliminary  branches  of  learning  in  the  schools  of  his  native  country,  and 
after  crossing  the  Atlantic  alone  at  the  age  of  fifteen  in  1866,  he  continued  his 
education  in  the  schools  of  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  to  which  place  a  sister  had  pre- 
ceded him.  There  he  not  only  became  familiar  with  the  English  language  but  also 
came  into  touch  with  American  thought,  habits  and  customs  as  exemplified  in  the 
lives  of  the  school  children  of  that  district.  Later  he  became  a  student  in  the 
schools  of  Waterloo  and  here  completed  his  more  specifically  literary  course. 
He  next  entered  the  College  of  Pharmacy  at  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  and  completed  the 
course  by  graduation  with  the  class  of  1875. 

Mr.  Wangler  again  became  a  resident  of  Waterloo  in  1878  and  in  connection 
with  his  brother,  R.  C.  Wangler,  purchased  the  drug  business  of  Carpenter  & 
Smith.  Their  store  was  located  on  East  Fourth  street,  but  about  a  quarter  of  a 
century  prior  to  the  death  of  Conrad  D.  Wangler  a  removal  was  made  to  the  corner 
of  East  Fourth  and  Lafayette  streets,  the  brothers  there  erecting  a  good  business 
block:  They  conducted  a  retail  business  alone  for  some  time  but  afterward  sold  an 
interest  to  Mr.  Todd,  at  which  time  the  firm  style  of  Wangler  Brothers  &  Todd 
was  assumed.  It  was  about  that  time  or  in  1900  that  the  Wangler  Drug  Company 
was  organized  for  the  conduct  of  a  wholesale  drug  business,  with  C.  D.  Wangler 
as  the  president.     Papers  of  incorporation  were  taken  out  and  the  business  was 


14  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

capitalized  for  one  hundred  thousand  dollars,  but  after  a  few  years  they  withdrew 
from  the  wholesale  trade  to  again  concentrate  their  efforts  upon  the  retail  busi- 
ness. They  had  a  large  and  well  appointed  store,  carrying  an  extensive  stock  of 
goods  and  doing  everything  in  their  power  to  meet  the  wishes  and  requirements 
of  the  public.  Conrad  D.  Wangler  was  also  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Waterloo 
Building  &  Loan  Association  and  for  many  years  served  as  one  of  its  directors. 
He  was  energetic  and  determined  and  quickly  recognized  the  possibilities  and  the 
obstacles  in  any  business  situation,  utilizing  the  former  to  the  best  advantage  and 
overcoming  the  latter  by  determined  and  honorable  effort. 

On  the  5th  of  May,  1878,  at  Cedar  Falls,  Mr.  Wangler  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Kathryn  Landgraf  and  they  became  the  parents  of  three  daughters: 
Clara  L.,  now  the  wife  of  W.  P.  Kerwin,  of  Oelwein;  Agatha  M.,  who  became  the 
wife  of  F.  C.  Braniger  of  \^'aterloo,  and  who  since  the  latter s  demise  about  four 
years  ago  has  been  with  her  mother;  and  Gertrude  J.,  also  at  home  with  the 
mother.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wangler  had  celebrated  their  thirtieth  wedding  anniversary 
ere  death  separated  them.  He  was  most  devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  family  and 
counted  no  sacrifice  on  his  part  too  great  if  it  would  enhance  their  happiness.  He 
also  held  friendship  inviolable  and  was  always  ready  to  extend  a  helping  hand  to 
a  friend. 

In  politics  Mr.  Wangler  was  a  democrat,  recognized  as  one  of  the  party  leaders 
in  Black  Hawk  county.  He  frequently  served  as  a  member  of  important  demo- 
cratic committees  and  attended  congressional  and  state  conventions  as  a  delegate. 
His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Catholic  church,  his  membership  being  in  St. 
Joseph's.  He  was  the  first  to  propose  the  construction  of  the  new  St.  Francis 
Hospital  and  was  a  most  enthusiastic  worker  when  the  plan  was  actually  under 
way.  At  the  end  his  greatest  desire  was  to  live  to  see  the  consummation  of  his 
hopes,  but  this  had  been  planned  otherwise.  He  belonged  to  the  Knights  of  Colum- 
bus and  held  the  ofiice  of  grand  knight  for  two  years.  He  was  also  a  member  of 
the  Waterloo  lodge  of  Elks.  To  his  church  he  was  a  most  generous  contributor 
and  was  equally  liberal  in  charitable  work,  serving  as  treasurer  of  the  Associated 
Charities  of  Waterloo  at  the  time  of  his  death.  Wherever  he  was  known  he  was 
held  in  high  esteem  and  most  of  all  where  he  was  best  known.  His  long  residence 
in  Waterloo  brought  him  a  very  wide  acquaintance  and  all  with  whom  he  came  in 
contact  were  glad  to  call  him  friend.  He  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  for 
good  upon  many  activities  with  which  he  was  connected  and  the  material,  political, 
social  and  moral  progress  of  the  city  was  furthered  through  his  cooperation. 


GEORGE  G.  DUNN. 


George  G.  Dunn  is  the  proprietor  of  one  of  the  leading  and  popular  retail 
establishments  of  Waterloo,  the  nature  of  the  business  being  indicated  in  its  name 
— the  Waterloo  Furniture  Company.  Mr.  Dunn's  connection  with  the  city  covers 
a  period  of  seven  years.  He  was  born  in  Van  Buren  county,  Iowa,  in  1864,  and 
there  spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth,  the  public-school  system  of  the 
county  affording  him  his  educational  privileges.  His  life  work  has  been  along 
the  line  of  the  furniture  trade.    He  was  first  engaged  in  the  furniture  business  in 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  15 

Garden  City,  Kansas,  wherehe  remained  for  a  few  years,  and  later  he  was  located 
at  other  places  until  he  came  to  Waterloo  in  1907,  at  which  time  he  bought  out 
the  Waterloo  Furniture  Store  and  has  since  continued  the  business  under  the 
name  of  the  W'aterloo  Furniture  Company.  He  occupies  the  entire  building  at 
Nos.  312-314  East  Fourth  street.  The  building  is  forty-four  by  eighty  feet 
and  five  stories  in  height  and  he  has  nearly  twenty  thousand  square  feet  of  floor 
space  which  he  utilizes  in  the  conduct  of  a  strictly  retail  furniture  business.  In 
his  establishment  is  found  furniture  of  all  grades  and  of  both  foreign  and  do- 
mestic manufacture.  His  stock  enables  him  to  meet  the  demands  of  any  taste 
and  pocketbook  and  he  has  ever  in  his  trade  recognized  the  fact  that  satisfied 
patrons  are  the  best  advertisement.  In  addition  to  being  proprietor  of  the  Water- 
loo Furniture  Company  he  is  also  at  the  head  of  the  Dunn-Hosmer  Furniture 
Company  of  Dubuque. 

In  1885  Mr.  Dunn  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  Jacobs  and  they  have 
become  the  parents  of  two  children :  R.  A.,  who  is  in  charge  of  the  Dunn-Hosmer 
Furniture  Company  at  Dubuque;  and  Belvia,  at  home.  The  parents  are  members 
of  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  guide  their  lives  by  its  teachings. 

Mr.  Dunn  is  also  a  faithful  representative  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the 
Modern  W^oodmen  of  America,  and  he  belongs  furthermore  to  the  Commercial 
Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  an  organization  which  has  for  its  object  the  welfare, 
betterment  and  business  development  of  the  community.  He  deserves  much 
credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished,  as  he  started  out  in  life  empty-handed  and 
without  the  assistance  of  influential  friends.  Today  he  is  at  the  head  of  an 
extensive  and  profitable  business  which  furnishes  employment  to  many  salesmen. 
He  has  their  loyalty  and  high  regard,  for  his  has  never  been  the  command  of  the 
tyrant  to  go  but  the  call  of  the  leader  to  come. 


CHARLES  SHERWOOD. 

Charles  Sherwood  is  by  the  consensus  of  pubHc  opinion  the  leading  florist  of 
Waterloo,  conducting  business  as  proprietor  of  the  Sherwood  Greenhouses.  A 
residence  of  a  third  of  a  century  in  this  city  has  made  him  well  known  and  his 
fellow  townsmen  have  had  ample  opportunity  to  judge  of  his  business  methods. 
He  was  born  in  Yorkshire,  England,  in  1853,  and  there  learned  the  florist's  busi- 
ness, with  which  he  has  been  identified  from  the  time  he  reached  the  age  of  twelve 
years  and  with  which  he  has  been  prominently  connected  from  the  age  of  sixteen. 
On  crossing  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  he  made  his  way  at  once  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  had  an  uncle  living  who  was  engaged  in  the  gardening  business. 

Charles  Sherwood  went  to  work  in  the  greenhouse  of  a  Mr.  Fowler  and  twenty- 
eight  years  ago  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account,  establishing  a  green- 
house where  the  Iowa  Dairy  Separator  plant  is  now  located.  He  sold  out  to  that 
company  about  ten  years  ago  and  removed  to  his  present  location  at  No.  550 
Conger  street,  where  he  is  the  proprietor  of  mammoth  greenhouses,  having  fifty 
thousand  feet  under  glass.  The  company  of  which  he  is  a  member  raises  all  kinds 
of  plants  and  cut  flowers  and  deals  in  seed.  It  has  a  downtown  house  on  East 
Fourth  street,  in  the  heart  of  the  city,  and  its  trade  has  steadily  grown  and  has 


16  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

now  reached  extensive  and  gratifying  proportions.  Mr.  Sherwood's  long  con- 
nection with  the  bnsiness  has  made  him  famiHar  with  every  phase  thereof.  He 
knows  botany  from  both  the  practical  and  scientific  standpoints  and  is  acquainted 
with  the  most  modern  methods  of  plant  production.  He  has  studied  the  effect  of 
soil  and  climatic  conditions  and  there  are  few  men  better  informed  concerning  the 
best  methods  of  plant  production  than  Mr.  Sherwood. 

In  1882  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Sherwood  and  Miss  Mary  J. 
Huggins.  also  a  native  of  England,  and  to  them  have  been  born  three  sons :  Albert 
Charles ;  Herbert  William,  who  has  charge  of  the  store ;  and  Frank  Huggins.  The 
oldest  and  youngest  sons  are  also  associated  with  their  father  in  the  conduct  of 
the  business  and  have  been  thoroughly  trained  therein.  The  firm  is  today  one  of 
the  foremost  in  its  line  in  this  part  of  the  state. 

Mr.  Sherwood  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  of  the  Eastern 
Star.  He  also  has  membership  with  the  Maccabees,  the  Tribe  of  Ben  Hur,  the 
Fraternal  Union  and  the  Sons  of  St.  George.  While  he  retains  a  deep  love  for 
his  native  land,  he  is  still  more  deeply  attached  to  the  land  of  his  adoption  and  he 
has  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to  come  to  the  new  world,  for 
here  he  has  found  the  business  opportunities  which  he  sought  and  in  their  utiliza- 
tion has  gradually  worked  his  way  upward.  Ability  and  merit  will  come  to  the 
front  anywhere  and  it  is  these  qualities  which  have  established  Charles  Sherwood 
as  a  leading  representative  of  the  florist's  business  in  Waterloo. 


JAMES  E.  DEMPSTER. 

James  E.  Dempster,  United  States  commissioner  and  secretary  of  the  Home 
Building  &  Loan  Association  of  Waterloo,  of  which  city  he  has  been  a  resident  for 
eight  years,  was  born  in  Fayette  county,  Iowa,  in  1867.  There  he  was  reared  and 
educated,  attending  the  public  schools  and  also  the  Upper  Iowa  University  at 
Fayette.  He  early  took  up  the  occupation  of  farming,  which  he  followed  con- 
tinuously until  about  twenty-nine  years  of  age.  when  he  was  called  to  public  office, 
being  elected  auditor  of  Fayette  county,  in  which  position  he  made  such  a  credit- 
able record  during  his  first  term  that  he  was  reelected  and  served  for  four  years. 
He  afterward  became  cashier  of  the  First  State  Bank  of  Lesueur  Center,  Min- 
nesota, where  he  remained  for  five  years,  and  in  1906  he  arrived  in  Waterloo.  For 
one  year  he  was  special  agent  for  a  fire  insurance  company,  after  which  he  engaged 
in  the  general  insurance  business  on  his  own  account.  He  also  filled  the  office  of 
justice  of  peace  for  four  years  and  his  decisions  were  strictly  fair  and  impartial. 

On  the  14th  of  July,  191 3,  Mr.  Dempster  became  secretary  of  the  Home  Build- 
ing &  Loan  Association  and  on  the  22d  of  May,  1912,  he  was  appointed  United 
States  commissioner  for  this  section.  His  appointment  found  its  justification  not 
only  in  his  ability  but  also  in  the  fidelity  which  he  had  ever  displayed  in  the  dis- 
charge of  official  duties  intrusted  to  him.  His  time  is  now  divided  between  his 
official  service  and  his  duties  in  connection  with  the  Home  Building  &  Loan  Asso- 
ciation. He  is  also  secretary  of  the  West  Waterloo  school  board,  apd  he  takes  an 
active  and  helpful  interest  in  many  matters  pertaining  to  the  general  good,  cooper- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  17 

ating  heartily  in  all  the  plans  and  projects  which  are  initiated  for  the  upbuilding 
of  the  county  and  the  advancement  of  civic  standards. 

In  March,  1889,  Mr.  Dempster  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Myrtle  Smith, 
of  Fayette  county,  and  unto  them  have  been  born  two  children:  John  F.,  who  is 
with  the  Firestone  Tire  &  Rubber  Company,  with  headquarters  at  Minneapolis, 
Minnesota;  and  James  M.,  who  is  with  the  Young  Coal  Company  of  Waterloo. 
Mr.  Dempster  is  an  Episcopalian  in  religious  faith,  and  he  also  has  membership 
with  the  Masons  and  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  He  is  ever  true  to 
his  professions  and  loyal  to  every  cause  which  he  espouses  and  his  well  spent  life 
has  won  him  high  regard.  While  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Waterloo  for  only 
eight  years,  he  has  been  a  resident  of  the  state  nearly  all  his  life  and  Iowa  finds  in 
him  a  representative  citizen,  who  in  all  of  his  public  service  has  subordinated  per- 
sonal aggrandizement  to  the  general  good. 


G.  G.  BICKLEY,  M.  D. 


The  student  of  history  cannot  carry  his  investigations  far  into  the  annals  of 
Black  Hawk  county  without  learning  that  the  Bickley  family  has  been  long,  closely 
and  honorably  identified  therewith.  It  is  of  this  family  that  Dr.  G.  G.  Bickley  is  a 
representative.  He  was  born  in  Waterloo  in  1886  and  is  a  son  of  Dr.  G.  G.  Bick- 
ley, Sr.,  now  deceased,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneer  physicians  of  Waterloo,  where 
he  practiced  continuously  and  successfully  for  many  years.  His  ability  in  that 
direction  and  his  efforts  in  other  connections  made  him  one  of  the  most  widelv 
known  and  prominent  citizens  of  the  county.  He  died  October  30,  191 1;  and  in 
his  passing  the  community  lost  one  of  its  honored  and  representative  citizens. 
His  son  and  namesake  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  received  home 
training  that  tended  to  develop  the  best  and  strongest  in  him.  His  advantages 
for  an  education  were  those  afforded  by  the  public  schools  and  ultimately  he 
was  graduated  from  the  West  Waterloo  high  school  with  the  class  of  1905.  The 
succeeding  two  years  were  devoted  to  the  mastery  of  a  literary  course  in  the 
University  of  Iowa  and  he  then  spent  one  year  in  study  in  the  medical  depart- 
ment of  the  State  University.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  entered  Hahnemann 
Medical  College  of  Chicago,  from  which  he  was  graduated  on  the  completion 
of  the  three  years'  course,  receiving  his  diploma  and  his  M.  D.  degree  in  191 1. 
He  afterward  spent  eighteen  months  in  Chicago  in  connection  with  the  Baptist 
Hospital  and  his  experience  there  was  of  untold  value  to  him,  as  it  enabled  him 
to  put  his  theoretical  knowledge  to  the  practical  test  and  to  gain  that  broad 
experience  which  only  hospital  service  can  bring. 

Dr.  Bickley  returned  to  Waterloo  in  1912  and  has  since  engaged  in  general 
practice,  forging  forward  constantly  as  the  result  of  his  ability,  determination  and 
laudable  ambition. 

In  1914  Dr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lois  Evelyn  Storm,  a 
daughter  of  E.  M.  Storm,  of  Waterloo.  Both  are  widely  and  favorably  known  in 
this  city  and  county,  genuine  personal  worth  winning  for  them  the  confidence  and 
good-will  of  all  with  whom  they  have  come  in  contact.  Dr.  Bickley  belongs  to  the 
Waterloo,  Black  Hawk  County,  Iowa  State  and  Illinois  State  Homeopathic  Med- 


18  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

ical  Associations  and  he  is  a  physician  in  attendance  at  the  hospitals  of  this  city. 
It  is  characteristic  of  him  that  what  he  undertakes  he  accomphshes  and  the  more 
difficult  the  medical  problem  which  confronts  him  the  more  anxious  and  deter- 
mined he  is  to  gain  a  successful  solution  thereof.  He  is  constantly  reading  along 
broadening  lines  and  keeps  in  touch  with  the  advanced  thought  and  purpose  of 
the  medical  profession. 


LOVANE  S.  PARSONS. 

Lovane  S.  Parsons,  as  proprietor  of  the  L.  S.  Parsons  Music  House,  is  at  the 
head  of  one  of  the  most  important  commercial  enterprises  of  Waterloo ;  in  fact, 
this  business  is  the  largest  of  its  kind  in  this  section  of  the  state,  having  enjoyed  a 
steady  and  substantial  growth  since  it  was  established  on  the  5th  of  August.  1876, 
by  him  who  is  still  the  proprietor. 

Mr.  Parsons  is  one  of  New  England's  native  sons.  He  was  born  in  Vermont  in 
1852  and  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  Green  Mountain  state.  Upon  attaining 
his  majority  he  left  home  and  went  to  Boston,  where  he  remained  for  about  two 
years,  but  at  that  time  he  heard  the  call  of  the  west  and  made  his  way  to  Iowa  in 
1876.  He  came  at  once  to  Waterloo  and  here  embarked  in  the  music  trade  but  his 
first  establishment  bore  little  resemblance  to  the  business  of  the  present  time,  for 
at  the  outset  he  had  but  one  organ  and  one  piano.  He  has  continued  in  the  busi- 
ness now  for  over  thirty-eight  years  and  his  trade  has  gradually  increased.  His 
store  was  originally  located  on  East  Fourth  street,  where  he  remained  until  1902, 
when  he  erected  his  present  large  business  block,  forty  by  one  hundred  feet  and 
three  stories  and  basement.  He  occupies  the  entire  building,  conducting  a  large 
retail  business,  although  he  also  sells  to  some  extent  to  the  wholesale  trade  and  is 
represented  by  several  agencies  located  in  different  towns  in  Iowa.  He  handles 
many  of  the  standard  makes  of  pianos  and  about  one-third  of  the  output  is  manu- 
factured especially  for  him  with  his  name  stamped  thereon.  He  sells  about  one 
hundred  thousand  dollars'  worth  of  instruments,  mostly  pianos,  annually.  The 
business  has  thus  grown  and  the  success  of  the  enterprise  is  attributable  entirely 
to  the  progressive  methods  and  the  close  application  and  unflagging  enterprise  of 
Mr.  Parsons.  He  is  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  music  trade  and  long  ex- 
perience has  taught  him  how  to  purchase  judiciously  and  sell  with  a  fair  profit. 
He  has  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best  advertisement 
and  in  trade  circles  he  enjoys  an  unassailable  reputation.  He  is  also  extensively 
interested  in  farm  lands  in  Iowa  and  Texas  and  is  the  owner  of  much  valuable 
city  property,  his  investments  having  been  most  judiciously  made. 

In  1878,  Mr.  Parsons  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lillie  Garrabrant,  of 
Waterloo,  who  died  December  29,  1893.  They  had  one  son,  Harry  O.,  who  is 
now  general  manager  of  the  music  house.  He  was  born  in  Waterloo  in  1880, 
was  reared  in  this  city  and  completed  his  education  as  a  student  in  the  East 
Waterloo  high  school.  He  has  been  reared  in  the  piano  trade  and  is  familiar 
with  every  phase  of  the  business.  He  became  his  father's  assistant  at  an  early 
age  and  as  the  years  passed  on  larger  responsibilities  were  intrusted  to  him. 
On  the  nth  of  September,  1906,  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mathilda 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  19 

P.  Myers,  of  Waterloo,  and  ■  they  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children, 
Harry  Otto  and  Virginia  Myers.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity, 
the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Fra- 
ternal Order  of  Eagles.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board 
of  Trade  and  is  popular  in  these  dififerent  organizations,  exemplifying  in  his 
life  the  beneficent  spirit  that  constitutes  the  basic  element  of  these  different 
fraternities.  He  is  also  a  communicant  of  Christ  Episcopal  church.  In  busi- 
ness circles  he  is  widely  and  favorably  known  and  is  one  of  the  directors  of  the 
Waterloo  Retail  Merchants  Association. 

L.  S.  Parsons  was  again  married  in  1896,  Dr.  Emma  Dawson  becoming  his 
wife.  She  was  one  of  the  two  doctors  who  owned  the  Waterloo  Electric  Cure 
and  has  attained  high  rank  in  her  profession.  She  received  her  more  specific 
literary  education  at  the  Western  Normal  College,  Bushnell,  Illinois.  She  then 
attended  the  medical  school  at  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan,  for  two  years  and  was 
graduated  in  medicine  in  1890  from  the  Northwestern  University.  Mr.  Parsons 
is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason  and  also  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  The 
principles  which  govern  his  conduct  are  further  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is 
a  member  of  the  First  Congregational  church  of  Waterloo  and  belongs  to  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  the  Waterloo  Retail  Merchants 
Association,  thus  keeping  in  active  touch  with  those  efforts  which  are  being 
made  to  extend  the  trade  relations  of  the  city  and  promote  its  affairs.  The 
sterling  integrity  of  his  character  has  naturally  gained  for  him  the  respect  and 
confidence  of  his  fellowmen.  He  is  widely  and  favorably  known  throughout  the 
county.  The  terms  progress  and  patriotism  might  be  considered  the  keynote  of 
his  character,  for  throughout  his  career  he  has  labored  for  the  improvement  of 
every  line  of  business  or  public  interest  with  which  he  has  been  connected.  He 
stands  as  an  excellent  representative  of  our  best  type  of  American  manhood  and 
chivalry. 


P.    E.    RITZ. 


P.  E.  Ritz,  an  attorney  of  Waterloo  engaged  in  active  practice  in  this  city 
since  1913,  was  born  at  Sergeant  Bluff,  seven  miles  from  Sioux  City,  Iowa,  in 
1882.  His  father,  P.  E.  Ritz,  Sr.,  was  also  a  native  of  that  place,  born  in  i860. 
He  there  carried  on  farming  and  is  still  living  in  that  city,  with  the  agricultural 
interests  of  which  he  has  been  identified  from  pioneer  times.  He  is  a  son  of 
John  A.  Ritz,  who  came  from  Pennsylvania  and  settled  at  Sergeant  Bluff  among 
the  earliest  residents  of  Iowa.  At  that  time  the  Indians  were  more  numerous  than 
the  white  settlers  and  he  had  various  experiences  with  the  redmen.  The  prairies 
were  covered  with  native  grasses  and  the  forests  were  uncut.  Wild  game  of  all 
kinds  was  to  be  had  in  abundance  and  there  were  also  many  wild  animals,  some 
of  which  were  a  menace  to  the  live  stock  upon  the  farms.  In  addition  to  develop- 
ing his  farm  property,  John  A.  Ritz  assisted  in  building  the  Northv/estern  Railroad 
from  Sioux  City  to  Omaha. 

P.  E.  Ritz,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  spent  his  youthful  days  under 
the  parental  roof  and  after  mastering  the  branches  of  learning  taught  in  the  lower 


20  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

grades  of  school  he  entered  the  high  school  of  Sioux  City,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  class  of  1902.  He  then  entered  the  Iowa  State  University  and 
won  his  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  with  the  class  of  1907.  His  broad  literary  learn- 
ing thus  served  as  an  excellent  foundation  upon  which  to  rear  the  superstructure 
of  professional  knowledge.  Deciding  upon  the  practice  of  law  as  a  life  work,  he 
began  studying  in  the  State  University  of  Iowa  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in 
1909.  For  three  years  he  was  principal  of  the  commercial  department  of  the  East 
Waterioo  high  school  and  was  the  organizer  of  that  department.  He  was  after- 
ward made  principal  of  the  entire  school  and  so  continued  for  a  year,  but  at  the 
end  of  that  time  resigned  his  position  to  take  up  the  practice  of  law,  which  he  has 
since  followed  in  all  of  the  state  and  federal  courts.  He  served  as  special  assistant 
county  attorney  under  W.  P.  Hoxie  during  the  fall  of  1913  and  again  in  1914.  He 
has  been  connected  with  much  important  litigation  tried  in  Waterloo  and  it  is 
well  known  that  he  prepares  his  cases  with  great  thoroughness  and  care,  while  in 
their  presentation  he  is  strong,  cogent  and  logical. 

In  1908  Mr.  Ritz  was  married  to  Miss  Ora  Iris  Crozier,  of  North  Liberty, 
Iowa,  and  they  have  two  children,  Russell  Wesley  and  Robert  E.  The  parents 
attend  the  First  Presbyterian  church  and  genuine  personal  worth  has  won  for  them 
the  high  regard  of  an  extensive  circle  of  friends.  Mr.  Ritz  is  a  member  of  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  he  has  been  identified  with  many  in- 
terests of  worth  in  his  city.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Chautauqua  Association,  is 
at  present  the  secretary,  and  for  four  years  acted  as  manager  in  planning  and 
conducting  the  Chautauquas  held  here.  He  belongs  to  the  Black  Hawk  County  Bar 
Association  and  he  enjoys  the  high  regard  and  good- will  of  his  fellow  practi- 
tioners because  of  his  close  conformity  to  the  highest  ethical  standards  of  the 
profession.  His  interest  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  welfare  of  city  and  county  is 
unabating  and,  while  he  holds  to  high  ideals,  he  uses  the  most  practical  methods 
for  their  fulfilling. 


CLYDE  ORRIN  LAMSON. 

Clyde  Orrin  Lamson,  a  well  known  figure  in  real-estate  circles  in  Waterloo, 
was  born  in  Waverly,  Iowa,  February  5,  1873,  a  son  of  James  and  Cornelia  F. 
(Davis)  Lamson,  who  were  natives  of  New  York  and  of  Iowa  respectively.  The 
father  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Ninth  Iowa  Volunteer  Infantry  during  the  Civil 
war,  remaining  at  the  front  for  three  years,  during  which  time  he  participated  in 
the  battles  of  Missionary  Ridge,  Lookout  Mountain  and  other  important  engage- 
ments which  led  to  the  final  victory  that  crowned  the  Union  arms.  He  and  his 
wife  are  now  residents  of  Anamosa,  Iowa,  where  they  have  many  warm  friends. 

Clyde  O.  Lamson  spent  his  youthful  days  in  Waverly  and  in  Anamosa,  Iowa, 
and  after  completing  his  public-school  education  won  his  diploma  of  graduation 
from  the  pharmaceutical  department  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa  with  the 
class  of  1894.  He  then  came  to  Waterloo  and  entered  the  drug  store  of  C.  B. 
Henderson  &  Company  as  prescription  clerk,  occupying  that  position  for  two 
years.  He  then  went  to  Hamptofi,  Iowa,  where  he  remained  in  a  drug  store  for 
a  year.     On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  returned  to  Anamosa  and  estab- 


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HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  23 

lished  a  drug  store  on  his  own  account.  He  conducted  that  business  for  two 
years  and  then  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  established  a  real-estate  office  and  has 
since  engaged  in  that  line  of  business.  He  has  negotiated  many  important  real- 
estate  transfers  and  is  one  of  the  foremost  real-estate  men  of  the  city.  This  does 
not  cover  the  scope  of  his  activities,  however,  for  in  the  fall  of  1914  he  opened 
the  Russell-Lamson  Hotel  of  Waterloo,  which  he  had  erected  and  which  is  one 
of  the  finest  in  the  west.  It  is  thoroughly  modern  in  every  particular,  equipped 
after  the  most  improved  style  of  hotel  furnishings,  and  would  be  a  credit  to  a 
much  larger  city.  Important  and  extensive  as  are  his  business  interests  in  con- 
nection with  the  management  of  the  hotel  and  the  conduct  of  his  real-estate  busi- 
ness, Mr.  Lamson  has  still  further  interests,  being  connected  with  the  J.  S.  Kemp 
Manufacturing  Company,  which  was  organized  in  Waterloo  in  1903  as  an  addition 
to  the  original  company  in  Newark  Valley,  New  York.  That  business  was  pur- 
chased by  Mr.  Lamson  and  others  and  is  continued  for  the  distribution  of  fer- 
tilizers, by  the  International  Harvester  Company,  who  purchased  the  business  at  a 
good  figure  about  1908.  The  factory  and  main  business,  however,  are  at  Waterloo 
and  at  this  point  an  extensive  trade  is  enjoyed.  He  also  built  the  Russell-Lamson 
office  building  at  the  comer  of  Fourth  and  Commercial  streets,  which  was  the 
first  office  building  in  Waterloo  equipped  with  elevator  service.  Mr.  Lamson  is 
both  a  forceful  and  resourceful  man,  ready  to  meet  any  emergency  and  capable  of 
wisely  directing  his  business  afifairs  to  a  successful  completion. 

On  the  28th  of  April,  1897,  in  Waterloo,  Mr.  Lamson  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Lillian  Richards  Russell,  a  daughter  of  Rensselaer  Russell,  who  was 
born  at  Snowden,  New  York,  in  1828,  and  in  1856  arrived  in  Waterloo.  He  was 
married  in  1853,  in  his  native  state,  to  Miss  Caroline  M.  Richards  and  they  soon 
became  widely  and  favorably  known  in  social  circles  of  Waterloo,  while  Mr. 
Russell  made  for  himself  a  creditable  place  in  business  life.  He  was  one  of  the 
first  bankers  of  this  city  and  was  the  owner  of  extensive  landed  possessions  in 
Black  Hawk  county.  His  poHtical  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party 
and  several  times  he  was  called  to  the  office  of  alderman.  He  belonged  to  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  to  the  Episcopal  church,  and  his  life 
was  guided  by  high  and  honorable  principles.  It  was  his  daughter  Lillian  who 
became  the  wife  of  Clyde  O.  Lamson  and  unto  them  have  been  born  two  children : 
Russell  Orrin,  whose  natal  day  was  October  6,  1899;  ^^^  Maxine  Russell,  born 
February  26,  1904. 

The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Episcopal  church  and  Mr. 
Lamson  is  senior  warden  of  St.  Martin's  church  of  Waterloo.  Since  age  con- 
ferred upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  voted  with  the  republican  party  and 
has  several  times  been  called  to  pubHc  office,  serving  for  four  years  as  a  member 
of  the  city  council  of  Waterloo,  while  for  nine  years  he  has  been  a  member  of 
the  school  board,  acting  as  its  president  for  four  years  of  that  time.  The  cause  of 
education  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  champion  and  he  has  done  effective  work  to 
further  the  interests  of  the  schools  in  this  locality.  In  Masonry  he  has  taken  the 
degrees  of  the  Scottish  Rite  and  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  he  also  is  a  member  of 
the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  belongs  to  the  Country  Club  and  is  a  member  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which  he  became  the  first  president  and  so  continued 
for  six  years,  doing  much  to  shape  the  policy  of  that  organization  and  broaden 
the  scope  of  its  usefulness.     His  life  has  indeed  been  a  busy  one,  fraught  with 

Vol.  II— 2 


24  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

good  results,  both  as  to  his  own  fortunes  and  to  the  public  welfare.  He  has  a 
wide  acquaintance  and  wherever  he  is  best  known  he  is  most  honored  and 
respected. 


JOHN  P.  BERRY. 


John  P.  Berry,  superintendent  of  the  Waterloo  Waterworks,  is  a  native  of 
Canada,  but  when  only  five  years  of  age  was  brought  to  this  city  by  his  parents, 
James  and  Mary  (Pollard)  Berry,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England.  They 
crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  in  1847  and  after  living  in  Canada  for  nine 
years  came  to  Waterloo  in  1856.  The  father  was  first  employed  in  "the  sawmill  of 
Morrison  &  Wilson  near  the  present  site  of  the  waterworks  of  Cedar  Falls.  He 
spent  the  greater  part  of  his  life  from  that  time  on  in  Black  Hawk  county  and 
his  last  years  were  passed  upon  a  farm  which  he  owned  in  the  vicinity  of  Hudson. 
There  he  died  more  than  forty-four  years  ago.  In  politics  he  was  a  republican 
and  was  a  well  known  citizen  of  early  days,  taking  an  active  interest  in  all  that 
pertained  to  the  county's  upbuilding  and  development. 

John  P.  Berry  was  born  in  1850  in  Canada  and  was  reared  in  Black  Hawk 
county  and  is  indebted  to  its  public-school  system  for  the  educational  oppor- 
tunities which  he  enjoyed.  He  attended  the  district  schools  and  also  the  Waterloo 
high  school  and  began  providing  for  his  own  support  as  a  teacher  in  the  schools 
of  Black  Hawk  township,  Grundy  county.  He  afterward  removed  to  western 
Iowa  and  later  went  to  Dakota,  but  after  one  summer  returned  to  Waterloo.  He 
then  married  and  took  up  his  abode  upon  a  farm,  devoting  two  years  to  general 
agricultural  pursuits.  He  then  returned  to  the  county  seat  and  learned  the  ma- 
chinist's trade  in  the  foundry  and  machine  shop  of  W.  S.  Robinson,  where  he 
spent  two  years.  He  then  became  connected  with  the  agricultural  implement 
business  of  Brubaker  &  Cascade,  spending  two  years  with  that  firm,  and  on  the 
ist  of  February,  1886,  he  entered  into  active  connection  with  the  waterworks 
department  of  the  city  as  foreman,  laying  the  mains  and  doing  the  construction 
work.  When  the  present  plant  was  built  he  was  the  second  engineer  and  he  has 
advanced  through  intermediate  grades  until  more  than  twenty  years  ago  he  was 
made  superintendent,  which  position  he  has  filled  continuously  since  with  great 
credit  to  himself  and  to  the  benefit  of  the  waterworks  system  and  the  satisfaction 
of  the  entire  public.  No  greater  evidence  of  his  capability  and  efficiency  could 
be  given  than  the  fact  that  he  has  been  retained  as  superintendent  for  more  than 
two  decades  and  that  his  identification  with  the  department  covers  twenty-eight 
years.  He  keeps  in  touch  with  improvements  that  are  being  continuously  made 
in  plants  of  this  character  and  has  made  the  waterworks  plant  thoroughly  modern. 

In  1875  Mr.  Berry  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Sarah  Agnes  Horn,  of 
Waterloo,  and  they  have  seven  children.  Myrtle,  the  eldest,  is  the  wife  of 
George  Gorson,  superintendent  of  mail  carriers  in  connection'  with  the  Waterloo 
postoffice.  Oscar,  who  married  Miss  Myrtle  Alexander,  has  been  connected  with 
the  Black  Hawk  Spice  Company  for  about  fifteen  years.  Fred  V.,  who  wedded 
Miss  Culetta  Seibert,  has  been  with  the  Iowa  Dairy  Separator  Company  for  thir- 
teen years.    Claud  C.  is  assistant  cashier  in  the  Security  Savings  Bank  of  Water- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  25 

loo,  with  which  he  has  been  connected  for  seven  years.  Ray  O.  is  in  the 
advertising  department  of  the  Daily  Courier.  Loren  J.  is  a  sophomore  in  the  high 
school.    Pearl  is  the  wife  of  Edwin  Laughlin,  of  Cedar  Rapids. 

Mr.  Berry  holds  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade. 
He  is  a  Mason  and  is  a  past  commander  in  the  uniform  rank  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  has  served  for  six  years  as  a  trustee  of  the  lodge. 
His  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  First  Presbyterian 
church.  He  is  serving  on  its  board  of  trustees  and  as  treasurer  of  the  men's  bible 
class,  and  he  does  everything  in  his  power  to  advance  the  growth  of  the  church 
and  extend  its  influence.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Old  Settlers  Society,  has  been 
for  three  years  a  member  of  the  executive  board  and  may  well  be  numbered 
among  the  honored  pioneer  residents  of  Waterloo,  for  he  has  made  his  home  in 
Black  Hawk  county  for  fifty-eight  years.  He  has  therefore  witnessed  much  of 
the  city's  growth  and  development  as  it  has  emerged  from  villagehood  to  become 
one  of  the  great  metropolitan  centers  of  the  state,  its  population  fast  approaching 
the  fifty  thousand  mark.  He  is  very  widely  known  and  is  most  highly  esteemed 
where  best  known,  a  fact  which  indicates  a  well  spent  and  honorable  life.  He  is 
one  to  whom  there  has  been  intrusted  important  public  service  and  over  his 
record  there  falls  no  shadow  of  wrong  or  suspicion  of  evil. 


HERBERT  BARBER  BOIES. 

For  twenty-four  years  Herbert  Barber  Boies  has  been  engaged  in  the  practice 
of  law  in  Waterloo  and  his  professional  career  has  been  marked  by  the  steady 
advancement  which  is  characteristic  of  the  present  age.  He  was  born  May  9,  1867, 
in  the  city  which  is  still  his  place  of  residence,  and  is  a  son  of  the  Hon.  Horace 
and  Versalia  ( Barber)  Boies,  natives  of  the  state  of  New  York. 

After  completing  a  public-school  education  in  Waterloo  Herbert  B.  Boies  en- 
tered the  State  University  at  Iowa  City  and  was  a  student  for  two  years  in  the 
collegiate  department  and  for  two  years  in  the  law  school.  He  was  graduated  in 
1891.  He  then  returned  home  and  began  practice  in  Waterloo,  where  he  has 
since  remained.  His  success  in  a  professional  way  afifords  the  best  evidence  of 
his  capabilities  in  this  line.  He  is  a  strong  advocate  with  the  jury  and  concise  in 
his  appeals  before  the  court.  He  has  a  keen  and  logical  mind,  plus  the  business 
sense,  and  a  ready  capacity  for  hard  work.  Moreover,  he  brought  to  the  starting 
point  of  his  legal  career  certain  rare  gifts — eloquence  of  language  and  a  strong 
personality.  His  thorough  grasp  of  the  law  and  the  ability  to  correctly  apply  its 
principles  are  factors  in  his  effectiveness  as  an  advocate. 

Mr.  Boies  was  married  in  Waterloo  in  1898  to  Miss  May  Carl,  who  died  leav- 
ing one  child,  Addella.  In  1909,  in  Sycamore,  Illinois,  Mr.  Boies  wedded  Faith 
Hoyt.  They  attend  the  Congregational  church,  and  Mr.  Boies  holds  membership 
with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

His  political  allegiance  has  always  been  given  to  the  democratic  party,  but 
he  has  never  been  a  politician  in  the  sense  of  office  seeking,  although  well  versed 
in  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  and  interested  in  the  success  of  his  party, 
as  he  prefers  to  concentrate  his  efforts  upon  his  profession,  regarding  the  pur- 


26  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

suits  of  professional  life  as  in  themselves  abundantly  worthy  of  his  best  efforts. 
On  the  3d  of  November,  1914,  however,  he  was  elected  one  of  three  district  judges 
and  polled  the  highest  vote  of  all.  He  was  a  candidate  on  the  nonpartisan  ticket. 
There  is  no  doubt  in  the  minds  of  his  many  supporters  that  his  record  on  the 
bench  will  be  in  harmony  with  his  record  as  a  man  and  a  lawyer,  distinguished  by 
an  unfaltering  devotion  to  duty  and  by  a  masterful  grasp  of  every  problem  pre- 
sented for  solution.  His  is  a  natural  discrimination  as  to  legal  ethics,  and  he  is  so 
thoroughly  well  read  in  the  minutiae  of  the  law  that  he  is  able  to  base  his  argu- 
ments upon  thorough  knowledge  of  and  familiarity  with  precedents,  and  to  present 
a  case  upon  its  merits,  never  failing  to  recognize  the  main  point  at  issue  and  never 
neglecting  to  give  a  thorough  preparation.  His  pleas  have  been  characterized  by  a 
terse  and  decisive  logic  and  a  lucid  presentation  rather  than  by  flights  of  oratory, 
and  his  power  is  the  greater  before  court  or  jury  from  the  fact  that  it  is  recog- 
nized that  his  aim  is  ever  to  secure  justice  and  not  to  enshroud  his  cause  in  a 
sentimental  garb  or  illusion  which  will  thwart  the  principles  of  right  and  equity 
involved. 


J.  W.  RATH. 


J.  W.  Rath  is  president  of  The  Rath  Packing  Company,  Waterloo,  an  impor- 
tant enterprise  which  has  featured  largely  in  the  business  development  of  the  city. 
With  other  important  commercial  concerns  he  is  also  identified  and  is  one  of  the 
representative  residents  of  Black  Hawk  county  who  well  deserves  mention  in  this 
volume.  He  was  born  in  Hardin  county,  Iowa,  in  1872,  and  comes  of  German 
ancestry.  His  father,  John  Rath,  was  born  in  Germany  and  about  1856  arrived 
in  Iowa,  settling  in  Dubuque.  Subsequently  he  removed  to  Cedar  Falls,  Black 
Hawk  county,  and  was  living  there  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war.  In  response  to 
the  country's  need  he  enlisted  in  1862  as  a  member  of  Company  B,  Thirty-first 
Iowa  Regiment,  with  which  he  served  for  three  years,  or  until  the  close  of  the  war. 
He  was  fortunate  in  that  he  escaped  wounds  and  injuries,  but  he  lost  a  brother, 
George  Rath,  who  was  killed  at  the  battle  of  Lookout  Mountain.  After  the  war 
John  Rath  returned  to  Iowa  and  was  engaged  in  the  lumber  and  grain  business  at 
Ackley,  where  he  prospered  as  the  years  passed  on  as  a  result  of  his  indefatigable 
industry  and  capable  management.  In  1881  he  established  the  Exchange  Bank  at 
Ackley  and  continued  there  in  the  banking  business  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
June  20,  1914,  being  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  and  prominent  busi- 
ness men  of  his  town. 

J.  \\' .  Rath,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  born  and  reared  in  Ackley 
and  pursued  a  public-school  education  there.  Later  he  attended  Bryant  &  Strat- 
ton's  Business  College  of  Chicago  and  on  leaving  that  institution  entered  his 
brother's  bank  in  Ackley.  In  1891  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  entered  into 
connection  with  his  present  business,  which,  in  March,  1891,  was  incorporated, 
his  father,  John  Rath,  being  president ;  A.  Holzer,  vice  president,  and  E.  F.  Rath, 
secretary  and  treasurer.  The  present  officers  of  the  company  are:  J.  W.  Rath, 
president,  and  I'.  J.  Fowler,  vice  president,  while  E.  F.  Rath  remains  as  secretary 
and  treasurer.     Their  business  is  largely  that  of  pork  packing,  but  they  are  now 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  27 

developing  the  beef  packing  industry  and  during  the  summer  of  1914  they  erected 
one  of  the  most  complete  beef  packing  establishments  in  the  state.  They  are  con- 
ducting an  extensive  business  in  their  line,  having  the  only  packing  house  in  Water- 
loo. Their  enterprise  also  furnishes  an  excellent  market  to  stock-raisers  of  this 
section.  Their  business  is  growing  year  by  year,  being  already  one  of  the  most 
important  productive  enterprises  of  the  city.  Mr.  Rath  is  likewise  a  director  of  the 
First  National  Bank  and  of  the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Company,  a  director  of  the 
Rath  State  Exchange  Bank  of  Ackley  and  president  of  the  Fifth  Street  Building 
Company.  He  finds  delight  in  solving  intricate  business  problems  and  his  expand- 
ing powers  have  made  him  one  of  the  foremost  representatives  of  commercial 
activity  in  his  city. 

Mr.  Rath  was  married  in  1895  to  Miss  Maud  Harbin,  of  Waterloo,  and  they 
have  two  children,  Anita  Louise  and  Howard.  The  parents  hold  membership  in 
the  First  Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  Rath  is  serving  on  its  board  of  trustees. 
He  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club,  the  Board  of  Trade  and  the  Town  Criers 
Club,  and  is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the 
republican  party  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Waterloo 
waterworks  and  has  been  a  member  of  the  city  council  for  two  terms.  He  was 
very  active  in  the  municipal  ownership  campaign  that  resulted  in  the  city  owning 
the  water  plant.  He  does  all  in  his  power  to  further  public  progress.  He  has 
ever  felt  a  hearty  concern  for  the  public  welfare  and  has  been  helpful  in  bring- 
ing about  those  purifying  and  wholesome  reforms  which  have  been  gradually 
growing  in  the  political,  municipal  and  social  life  of  the  city.  It  is  true  that 
his  chief  life  work  has  been  that  of  a  remarkably  successful  business  man,  but 
the  range  of  his  activities  and  the  scope  of  his  influence  have  reached  far  beyond 
this  special  field.  He  belongs  to  that  class  of  men  who  wield  a  power  which  is 
all  the  more  potent  from  the  fact  that  it  is  moral  rather  than  political  and  is 
exercised  for  the  public  weal  rather  than  for  personal  ends. 


EDWARD  L.  ROHLF,  M.  D. 

Thorough  college  training  and  service  as  an  interne  qualified  Dr.  Edward  L. 
Rohlf  for  the  practice  of  his  profession  at  Waterloo,  where  he  located  in 
August,  1901.  Since  that  time  he  has  advanced  steadily  in  the  path  of  his  chosen 
calling  and  is  today  recognized  as  one  of  the  able  physicians  of  Black  Hawk 
county.  He  was  born  in  Davenport,  Iowa,  June  10,  1868,  his  parents  being 
Amos  H.  and  Dorothy  (Schroeder)  Rohlf,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Ger- 
many and  became  residents  of  Iowa  in  childhood.  The  former  was  a  farmer 
throughout  the  period  of  his  active  life.  His  father  came  to  the  United  States 
and  died  at  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years. 

Dr.  Rohlf  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  schools  of  Scott  county,  Iowa, 
and  for  a  year  was  a  student  in  the  pharmaceutical  department  of  Drake  Uni- 
versity at  Des  Moines.  He  became  a  registered  pharmacist  and  followed  that 
pursuit  for  seven  years.  It  was  a  logical  step  to  the  practice  of  medicine,  for 
which  he  carefully  prepared,  supplementing  private  reading  by  a  course  in  the 
Omaha  Medical  College,  now  the  medical  department  of  the  State  University  of 


28  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Nebraska.  He  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1900  and  spent  a  year  as  interne  in 
the  Methodist  Hospital  at  Omaha,  gaining  that  broad  practical  experience  and 
knowledge  that  only  hospital  practice  can  give.  In  August,  1901,  he  removed 
to  Waterloo,  opened  an  office  and  has  since  engaged  in  general  practice,  being 
accorded  a  liberal  patronage.  He  is  now  secretary  of  the  Presbyterian  Hospital 
of  Waterloo,  which  position  he  has  occupied  since  the  establishment  of  that 
institution.  He  has  also  been  coroner  of  the  county  for  a  full  term  and  a  part 
of  another. 

On  the  9th  of  October,  1907,  in  Waterloo,  Dr.  Rohlf  was  married  to  Miss 
Luella  Johnson  and  they  have  one  son,  Edward  L.  They  are  members  of  the 
Westminster  Presbyterian  church  and  Dr.  Rohlf  gives  his  political  allegiance 
to  the  republican  party,  having  indorsed  its  principles  since  becoming  a  voter. 
He  is  a  Master  Mason,  an  Odd  Fellow,  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  an  Elk.  He 
belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  of  the  west  side  and  in  strictly  professional 
connections  has  membership  with  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  the  Cedar 
Valley  Medical  Association,  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Society  and  the  American 
Medical  Association.  He  is  a  man  of  pronounced  ability  in  the  field  of  his 
chosen  calling  because  of  his  wide  study,  his  broad  experience  and  his  humani- 
tarian principles,  which  prompt  him  to  put  forth  zealous  and  conscientious 
effort  on  behalf  of  his  patients. 


M.  J.  MORGAN. 


M.  J.  Morgan  is  the  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Morgan  &  Sullivan,  owning 
one  of  the  leading  clothing  and  men's  furnishing  goods  establishments  in  Water- 
loo. He  has  been  a  resident  of  this  city  for  but  a  comparatively  brief  period, 
arriving  in  November,  1910,  but  in  the  interim  has  become  well  established  as 
an  enterprising  and  progressive  merchant,  his  life  exemplifying  modern  business 
methods.  He  was  born  in  Stark  county,  Ohio,  in  1872,  and  was  eleven  years  of 
age  when  his  parents.  Rev.  John  W.  and  Mary  Morgan,  removed  to  Wilkes- 
Barre,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  he  reached  the  age  of 
twenty  years.  He  was  then  attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the  growing  west 
and  made  his  way  to  Deadwood,  South  Dakota,  where  he  was  employed  for  some 
time  in  a  store,  remaining  in  the  employ  of  others  until  1902,  when  he  formed  a 
partnership  with  J.  H.  Sullivan,  establishing  the  firm  of  Morgan  &  Sullivan,  who 
conduct  business  as  dealers  in  clothing  and  men's  furnishing  goods.  They  con- 
tinued the  business  at  Deadwood  until  1910,  when  they  sold  out  there  and  came  to 
Waterloo.  Here  they  again  embarked  in  business  along  the  same  line,  opening  a 
store  at  the  old  Bradley  stand  with  an  entire  new  stock  of  clothing  and  men's  fur- 
nishings. Moreover,  they  supplied  the  store  with  new  fixtures  and  now  have  one 
of  the  most  attractive,  modern  and  up-to-date  estabHshments  of  Waterloo.  Their 
business  has  steadily  grown  until  they  are  now  among  the  leaders  in  their  line  in 
the  city.  Their  business  methods  are  thoroughly  reliable.  They  are  straight- 
forward in  all  their  dealings  and  this,  combined  with  the  excellence  and  attractive- 
ness of  their  stock,  has  won  for  them  a  large  and  profitable,  trade. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  29 

In  1896,  Mr.  Morgan  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Adelaide  Case,  of  Blairs- 
town,  Iowa.  He  belongs  to  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  rules  which  govern 
his  conduct  and  shape  his  course  in  relation  to  his  fellowmen  are  further  indi- 
cated in  the  fact  that  he  is  a  member  of  the  First  Congregational  church.  He 
belongs  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Waterloo  Club  and  he  is  one  of 
the  vice  presidents  of  the  Waterloo  Retail  Merchants  Association.  He  exemplifies 
the  modern  spirit  of  the  times  in  his  trade  relations.  He  studies  every  phase  of 
the  business  and  all  conditions  bearing  upon  the  trade  and  he  believes  thoroughly 
in  united  efifort  among  the  merchants  to  advance  and  upbuild  the  commercial 
welfare  of  the  city.  His  has  been  an  active,  useful  and  well  spent  life  and  in 
Waterloo,  as  in  the  other  districts  where  he  has  resided,  he  has  gained  many 
warm  friends. 


F.  C.  STETZEL. 


The  record  of  business  enterprise  in  Black  Hawk  county  would  be  incom- 
plete were  there  failure  to  make  prominent  reference  to  the  Waterloo  Skirt  & 
Garment  Company,  of  which  F.  C.  Stetzel  is  the  efficient  secretary.  He  became 
a  resident  of  Waterloo  in  June,  1900,  but  is  an  eastern  man  by  birth,  the  place 
of  his  nativity  being  McEwensville,  Pennsylvania,  and  his  natal  year  1869.  He 
is  a  son  of  John  and  Fannie  Stetzel,  who  removed  with  their  family  to  the  west 
when  their  son,  F.  C,  was  a  lad  of  ten  years.  The  family  home  was  established 
at  Colman,  South  Dakota,  where  he  was  reared  and  acquired  his  education  by 
attending  the  public  schools.  He  afterward  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching 
but,  desirous  to  advance  his  own  intellectual  development,  he  afterward  entered 
the  Iowa  State  College  of  Agriculture  at  Ames,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  in  1898.  Still  later  he  continued  his  studies 
in  the  University  of  Minnesota  and  through  the  winter  months  he  engaged  in 
teaching  school.  Afterward  he  matriculated  in  Drake  University  as  a  law  student 
and  was  graduated  from  the  law  department  of  that  school  with  the  class  of  1901. 

However,  in  1900,  Mr.  Stetzel  had  entered  the  employ  of  the  Waterloo  Skirt 
&  Garment  Company  as  a  traveling  representative  and  has  since  continued  in 
active  connection  with  that  business.  After  a  time  he  became  one  of  the  stock- 
holders and  in  1910  he  was  elected  to  the  position  of  secretary  and  member  of 
the  board  of  directors.  He  has  since  had  voice  in  the  management  of  this  grow- 
ing and  important  enterprise,  of  which  R.  E.  Montague  is  the  president  and  Guy 
N.  See  is  treasurer.  The  steps  in  his  orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible. 
He  has  made  continuous  advancement,  actuated  by  a  laudable  ambition  and  un- 
faltering determination,  and  as  he  has  progressed  there  have  opened  before  him 
wider  opportunities  which  he  has  utilized  to  full  advantage.  Aside  from  his  con- 
nection with  the  Waterloo  Skirt  &  Garment  Company  he  is  also  interested  with 
his  brother  in  the  Waterloo  Office  Supply  Company  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the 
Black  Hawk  National  Bank,  with  which  he  thus  became  connected  on  its  organiza- 
tion. He  is  Hkewise  interested  in  other  business  enterprises  and  is  a  young  man 
of  notably  sound  judgment,  keen  discrimination  and  indefatigable  energy. 


30  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  1901  Mr.  Stetzel  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss. Pearl  McWilliams,  who 
won  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science  from  the  Iowa  State  College  at  Ames  in 
1898,  graduating  with  first  honors  in  a  class  of  eighty-six.  She  followed  the 
profession  of  teaching  in  Iowa  for  six  or  eight  terms  and  for  a  number  of  years 
was  connected  with  the  Waterloo  &  Cedar  Falls  Union  Mill  Company.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Stetzel  are  members  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church,  in  the  work  of  which 
they  have  taken  an  active  and  helpful  part,  doing  everything  in  their  power  to 
advance  the  growth  of  the  church  and  extend  its  influence. 

Mr.  Stetzel  has  served  on  the  board  of  trustees  and  for  a  number  of  years 
was  a  teacher  of  the  women's  Bible  class.  He  is  also  an  exemplary  representative 
of  Masonry,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  Knight  Templar  degree,  exemplifying 
in  his  life  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft,  which  recognizes  the  brotherhood  of 
man.  He  belongs  to  that  class  who  are  constantly  pushing  forward  the  wheels 
of  progress.  Opportunity  constantly  plays  before  the  dreamer  as  a  will-of-the- 
wisp,  but  surrenders  its  prizes  to  the  man  of  determination,  energy  and  sound 
judgment.  It  is  not  by  reason  of  any  unusual  qualities  that  Mr.  Stetzel  has 
worked  his  way  upward  but  through  the  utilization  of  opportunities  which  others 
have  passed  heedlessly  by.  Industry  has  ever  been  his  watchword  and  has  led 
him  constantly  forward  to  the  goal  of  success. 


HOMER  HORATIO  SEERLEY,  LL.  D. 

Dr.  Homer  Horatio  Seerley,  president  of  the  Iowa  State  Teachers  College 
at  Cedar  Falls,  is  one  of  the  well  known  educators  of  the  country,  having  long 
been  prominently  associated  with  the  Iowa  State  Teachers  Association  and  the 
National  Educational  Association.  Moreover  he  has  been  honored  with  election 
to  membership  in  the  National  Council  of  Education,  which  numbers  but  one 
hundred  and  twenty  representatives.  Life  is  to  him  purposeful  and  his  efiforts 
are  resultant,  and  various  improvements  in  methods  of  teaching  are  directly 
traceable  to  his  initiative  and  his  labors,  his  influence  being  especially  felt  in 
the  schools  of  Iowa. 

Dr.  Seerley  was  born  near  Indianapolis.  Indiana,  August  13.  1848,  a  son  of 
Thomas  and  Louisa  Ann  (Smith)  Seerley.  The  father,  who  was  born  in  Mary- 
land in  1821,  was  a  representative  of  one  of  the  families  who  colonized  Maryland 
under  the  direction  of  Lord  Baltimore.  The  mother,  who  was  born  in  Liberty, 
Indiana,  in  1826,  was  a  member  of  a  family  of  Rockingham  county,  \'irginia. 
Thomas  Seerley  went  to  Indiana  by  way  of  Pennsylvania  when  the  city  of  Indian- 
apolis was  a  village  and  there  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Louisa  Ann  Smith,  who 
accompanied  her  parents  on  their  removal  to  Indiana's  capital.  Thomas  Seerley 
devoted  his  life  to  the  occupation  of  farming.  In  1852  he  removed  with  his  family 
to  Stark  county,  Illinois,  and  m  1854  went  to  Keokuk  county,  Iowa. 

Homer  H.  Seerley  was  but  six  years  of  age  when  the  family  arrived  in  this 
state,  his  childhood  days  being  spent  upon  a  farm  near  South  English.  His  father, 
a  pioneer  settler  of  the  state,  engaged  in  teaching  school  through  the  winter  months 
and  also  aided  in  the  erection  of  schoolhouses  and  churches  and  in  making  other 
public  improvements  in  the  district  in  which  he  lived.    The  summer  seasons  were 


HOMER  H.  SEERLEY,  LL.  D. 


^STO'' 


1.6 


jO% 


..O*^* 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  33 

devoted  to  farming  to  the  time  of  his  retirement  from  active  life,  when  he  removed 
to  Iowa  City,  there  passing  away  in  1904.  He  never  held  a  public  office,  save  local 
positions  such  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  justice  of  the  peace.  He 
served,  however,  as  an  officer  in  the  church  and  in  the  Masonic  lodge  acted  as 
master  of  Naphthali  Lodge,  F.  &  A.  M.,  at  South  English,  Iowa,  for  twelve  years. 
His  widow  survived  him  for  a  decade,  passing  away  in  Iowa  City  in  19 14. 

Following  the  removal  of  the  family  to  Iowa  Dr.  Seerley  became  a  pupil  in 
the  country  schools,  which  he  attended  from  1854  until  1866.  His  secondary  edu- 
cation was  received  in  the  preparatory  department  of  the  State  LIniversity  at  Iowa 
City,  which  he  entered  as  a  freshman  in  1869  and  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  Bachelor  of  Philosophy  degree  in  the  class  of  1873.  He  received  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Didactics  from  the  university  in  1875,  the  Master's  degree 
in  1876  and  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Laws  in  1901,  the  honorary  degrees  being 
conferred  upon  him  in  recognition  of  the  high  position  to  which  he  had  attained 
in  educational  circles  and  his  valuable  contributions  to  the  world's  work  along 
that  line.  Early  in  his  professional  career  he  became  a  high-school  teacher  in 
Oskaloosa,  Iowa,  accepting  the  position  there  in  1873.  He  had  previously  taught 
in  the  country  schools  for  three  years  before  completing  his  college  course.  He 
was  made  high-school  principal  at  Oskaloosa  in  1874  and  the  following  year  was 
chosen  superintendent  of  the  city  schools  there,  remaining  in  that  capacity  until 
1886,  when  he  was  called  to  the  presidency  of  the  State  Normal  School  at  Cedar 
Falls  and  has  since  been  retained  as  the  incumbent  in  that  position,  covering  a 
period  of  twenty-eight  years.  His  power  and  ability  have  increased  through  the 
exercise  of  effort  and  his  activities  have  reached  out  in  a  constantly  broadening 
circle  until  he  has  left  an  indelible  impress  upon  educational  progress.  He  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Iowa  State  Teachers  Association  since  1873  and  in  all  the 
intervening  years  has  never  failed  to  attend  its  meetings.  He  is  a  member  of  its 
executive  committee  and  was  president  in  1884.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
National  Educational  Association  since  1876  and  in  1898  was  made  president 
of  the  Department  of  Normal  Schools.  In  1891  he  became  a  member  of  the 
National  Council  of  Education,  a  position  of  honor  and  distinction,  inasmuch 
as  the  organization  has  but  one  hundred  and  twenty  members  in  the  United 
States.  He  is  acquainted  with  many  of  the  most  eminent  educators  of  America, 
who  recognize  in  him  a  peer  and  one  whose  contributions  to  the  profession  have 
been  of  marked  value.  Since  its  organization  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Simplified  Spelling  of  New  York. 

In  1878  Dr.  Seerley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Clara  E.  Twaddle,  of 
Oskaloosa,  Iowa,  and  to  them  have  been  born  the  following  named :  Dr.  Clement 
C,  of  Manhattan,  Montana;  Mrs.  Claude  E.  CuUey,  of  Waterloo,  Iowa;  and 
Mrs.  Atherton  B.  Clarke,  of  Cedar  Rapids. 

Dr.  Seerley  is  a  member  of  the  Congregational  church  of  Cedar  Falls  and  in 
Masonry  has  attained  the  degrees  of  the  blue  lodge,  chapter  and  commandery. 
In  connection  with  the  great  political,  sociological  and  economic  questions  he 
keeps  abreast  with  the  best  thinking  men  of  the  age  and  association  with  him 
means  expansion  and  elevation.  His  profession  has  been  to  him  more  than  a 
means  of  imparting  knowledge.  He  has  ever  believed  that  the  purpose  of  teach- 
ing is  to  develop  capacity  and  has  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  it  is  in  youth 
that  the  life  of  a  man  is  marked  out,  his  future  course  decided  and  his  choice 


34  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

as  to  good  or  evil  made.  His  efforts  have  accordingly  been  directed  by  a  recog- 
nition of  this  truth  and  he  has  made  the  object  of  his  life  work  the  training  of 
each  individual  to  reach  the  highest  perfection  possible  for  him. 


GEORGE  W.  PETT. 


George  W.  Pett,  a  dealer  in  windmills,  pumps  and  gasoline  engines  and  also 
taking  contracts  for  well  drilling  and  similar  work,  is  one  of  the  old-time  business 
men  of  Waterloo,  having  resided  here  for  a  third  of  a  century.  He  was  born  in 
England  in  1869,  a  son  of  George  and  Bertha  Pett.  He  was  four  years  of  age 
when  his  father  emigrated  with  his  family  to  New  Zealand,  making  the  journey 
by  way  of  Cape  Horn.  They  were  ninety-six  days  in  completing  the  voyage, 
which  was  made  upon  a  sailing  vessel,  and  they  landed  in  New  Zealand,  on 
North  Island,  where  they  remained  for  six  years.  There  the  father  and  his 
brother  conducted  a  large  farm  of  four  hundred  acres,  but  when  six  years  had 
passed  they  sold  their  property  in  that  country  and  returned  to  England  by  way 
of  Australia,  stopping  for  a  short  time  in  Melbourne.  They  continued  the  jour- 
ney by  rail  and  through  the  Suez  canal,  being  passengers  on  one  of  the  first  mail 
steamers  to  go  through  the  canal.  The  return  trip  from  New  Zealand  covered 
about  forty-two  days.  The  mother  died  in  England,  after  which  the  father  again 
left  his  native  land  and  made  his  way  to  Canada,  settling  in  Toronto,  where  he 
remained  for  about  a  year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Waterloo, 
arriving  about  1882. 

George  W.  Pett  accompanied  his  father  on  his  various  removals  and  was  a 
lad  of  about  thirteen  years  when  he  arrived  in  Iowa.  He  retains  vivid  recollec- 
tions of  many  of  his  early  experiences  in  connection  with  their  travels.  After 
reaching  Black  Hawk  county  he  started  out  to  make  his  own  living  and  worked 
out  as  a  farm  hand  in  the  vicinity  of  Waterloo  until  he  was  twenty-five  years  of 
age.  He  was  then  married  and  his  last  employer  sold  him  a  tract  of  land  and 
loaned  him  the  money  with  which  to  build  a  house.  Mr.  Pett  then  engaged  in  the 
dair>'  business  on  a  small  scale,  but  gradually  his  patronage  increased  until  he 
became  one  of  the  leading  dairymen  of  this  part  of  the  state,  milking  fifty  cows 
of  his  own  beside  buying  milk  from  about  seventy-five  other  cows.  He  thus 
enjoyed  an  extensive  trade  and  was  in  the  dairy  business  for  about  ten  years, 
at  the  end  of  which  time  he  sold  out  and  came  to  W^aterloo.  Through  the  suc- 
ceeding two  years  he  lived  largely  retired  on  account  of  the  condition  of  his 
health,  but  at  the  end  of  that  time  he  bought  a  half  interest  in  the  Charles  Burd 
drill  business  and  about  a  year  later  purchased  his  partner's  interest.  From  that 
time  forward  the  business  has  steadily  increased  under  the  able  management  and 
direction  of  Mr,  Pett  until  it  is  the  largest  concern  of  the  kind  in  this  section  of 
the  state.  In  1910  he  purchased  the  corner  lot  on  West  Fifth  street  and  there 
has  a  building  sixty  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet,  which  he  occupies  in  the 
conduct  of  his  business  interests.  He  is  a  dealer  in  windmills  and  has  sold  two 
carloads  during  the  last  year.  He  also  sells  pumps  and  does  pump  fitting  and 
well  drilling.  He  also  handles  gasoline  engines,  wagons,  elevators,  barn  cleaners, 
etc.     He  is  now  building  an  addition  to  his  present  quarters  and  doubling  his 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  35 

capacity.  He  employs  six  men  regularly  and  others  as  they  are  needed.  The 
property  which  he  purchased  for  seven  thousand  dollars  has  trebled  in  value  and 
his  business  is  a  most  important  enterprise,  the  annual  sales  now  reaching  a  large 
fig-ure.  Mr.  Pett  is  likewise  interested  in  other  business  concerns  and  is  a  man  of 
sound  judgment  and  keen  sagacity. 

On  Christmas  eve  of  1894  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Pett  and  Miss 
Caroline  Litchford,  who  was  also  a  native  of  that  section  of  England  in  which 
her  husband  was  born.  They  have  two  living  children,  Bertha  Gladys  and  Charles 
William.  Mr.  Pett  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  First  Baptist  church  and 
he  is  serving  as  one  of  its  trustees.  Its  teachings  find  exemplification  in  his  life 
and  his  career  has  ever  been  an  upright  and  honorable  one.  His  activity  in  busi- 
ness has  not  only  contributed  to  his  individual  success,  but  has  also  been  an 
active  factor  in  the  commercial  development  of  Waterloo.  His  interests  are 
thoroughly  identified  with  those  of  the  city  and  at  all  times  he  is  ready  to  lend 
his  aid  and  cooperation  to  any  movement  calculated  to  benefit  this  section  of  the 
country  or  advance  its  wonderful  development.  By  perseverance,  determination 
and  honorable  eflrort  he  has  overthrown  the  obstacles  which  have  barred  his  path 
to  success  and  has  reached  the  goal  of  prosperity. 


JAMES  I.  KENYON. 


James  I.  Kenyon  is  an  active  member  of  the  bar  of  Waterloo,  where  he  has 
practiced  since  September,  1909,  and  is  also  secret.ary  and  general  manager  of 
the  Galloway  Investment  Company.  He  was  born  in  Adel,  Dallas  county,  Iowa, 
in  1885,  a  son  of  I.  A.  Kenyon,  of  Waukee,  Iowa,  who  removed  to  Dallas  county 
more  than  thirty-five  years  ago  and  at  the  present  time  is  engaged  in  general 
merchandising  in  that  county. 

James  I.  Kenyon  supplemented  a  public-school  education  by  study  in  Drake 
University  at  Des  Moines  and,  completing  the  law  course,  was  graduated  with 
the  class  of  1908.  He  then  further  continued  his  studies  in  Yale  University  in 
the  scholastic  year  of  1908-9  and  in  September  of  the  latter  year  came  to  Water- 
loo. Here  he  entered  into  partnership  with  James  S.  Barr  for  the  practice  of 
law,  that  connection  continuing  until  August,  1910,  since  which  time  he  has  prac- 
ticed alone,  with  office  in  the  Black  Hawk  building.  He  continues  in  general 
practice  and  has  made  an  excellent  record  for  one  of  his  years.  He  throws  him- 
self easily  and  naturally  into  the  argument.  There  is  no  straining  after  effect. 
On  the  contrary,  there  is  a  precision  and  clearness  in  his  statement  that  speaks 
a  mind  well  trained  in  the  school  of  close  investigation  and  to  which  thorough 
reasoning  has  become  habitual  and  easy.  He  has  largely  specialized  in  civil  law 
and  is  now  attorney  for  several  well  known  corporations.  He  served  as  city 
attorney  from  1912  until  1914  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  County  Bar  Association. 
Aside  from  his  law  practice  he  has  been  associated  with  the  Galloway  Investment 
Company  since  August,  1910,  and  in  August,  1912,  he  became  its  secretary  and 

attorney. 

On  the  i8th  of  June,  1913,  Mr.  Kenyon  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  May 
Belle  Daniels,  of  Iowa  F'alls,  by  whom  he  has  one  child,  Elizabeth  May.     Mr. 


36  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Kenyon  is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason  and  a  Shriner,  an  Elk,  a  Knight  of  Pythias 
and  an  Odd  Fellow.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Town  Criers  Club,  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  and  to  the  Waterloo  Clul).  His  broad-mindedness  keeps  him  in  touch 
with  the  general  interests  of  society  and  he  has  been  active  along  various  lines 
affecting  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  his  city.  He  is  now  recognized  as  an 
energetic,  enterprising  business  man  and  a  capable  lawyer,  and  in  his  profession 
he  has  won  very  favorable  criticism  for  the  careful  and  systematic  methods  which 
he  has  followed. 


THOMAS  U.  McMANUS,  M.  D. 

The  tendency  of  the  age  is  toward  specialization.  There  are  comparatively 
few  representatives  of  professional  life  who  attempt  to  master  the  various 
branches  of  the  profession  to  which  they  incline,  as  the  majority  concentrate 
their  efforts  along  a  single  line  and  thus  gain  superior  ability  in  that  field.  This 
Dr.  Thomas  U.  McManus  has  done,  specializing  in  the  treatment  of  the  eye,  ear, 
nose  and  throat.  He  is  one  of  the  native  sons  of  Black  Hawk  county,  his  birth 
having  occurred  upon  a  farm  on  the  7th  of  August,  1872,  a  son  of  Thomas  P. 
and  Sarah  (Rupp)  McManus,  the  former  a  native  of  Knox  county,  Ohio,  and 
the  latter  of  Richmond  county,  Ohio.  They  became  residents  of  Black  Hawk 
county  in  1867  and  here  the  family  has  since  been  represented.  The  MciNIanus 
family  is  of  Irish  lineage.  The  father  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war,  going 
to  the  front  in  August,  1861,  as  a  member  of  Company  I,  Twenty-seventh  Illinois 
Infantry.  He  continued  his  residence  in  Black  Hawk  county  from  1867  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  January  20,  1909.  His  widow  survives  and  now  makes  her 
home  at  Hudson,  Iowa. 

At  the  usual  age  Dr.  McManus  became  a  pupil  in  the  district  schools  and  at 
the  age  of  sixteen  entered  the  State  Normal  school,  now  called  the  Iowa  State 
Teachers'  College,  at  Cedar  Falls,  being  there  graduated  with  the  class  of  1893. 
He  next  entered  Des  Moines  College  at  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  and  upon  the  com- 
pletion of  a  classical  course  won  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  in  1895.  In  1898  the 
Master  of  Arts  degree  was  conferred  upon  him.  He  entered  the  College  of  Physi- 
cians &  Surgeons  of  Chicago,  now  known  as  the  medical  department  of  the  Univer- 
sity of  Illinois,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1898.  He  first  settled  at  Dunkerton, 
Black  Hawk  county,  Iowa,  but  in  1899  he  came  to  W^aterloo,  where  he  continued 
in  general  practice  until  1909.  Since  that  time  he  has  made  a  specialty  of  the 
treatment  of  diseases  of  the  eye,  ear,  nose  and  throat.  He  is  an  able  physician, 
well  versed  in  the  departments  of  general  practice  and  particularly  skillful  in  his 
specialty.  He  reads  broadly,  thinks  deeply  and  is  conversant  with  the  most  im- 
proved methods  of  practice  and  the  most  advanced  ideas  concerning  his  chosen 
life  work.  From  the  beginning  of  his  professional  career  he  has  embraced  every 
opportunity  to  promote  his  efficiency  and  in  1903  took  a  post-graduate  course  in 
the  New  York  Post-Graduate  Medical  College.  In  1906  he  returned  to  the  same 
institution  for  further  study  and  in  1909  was  a  student  at  the  Chicago  Eye,  Ear, 
Nose  &  Throat  College  and  Hospital,  to  which  he  returned  for  further  work  in 
1910.     He  was  a  member  of  the  Iowa  state  board  of  health  and  the  Iowa  state 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  37 

board  of  medical  examiners  from  1909  to  1913  and  was  president  in  1912-13  of 
the  state  board  of  medical  examiners.  He  ranks  with  the  leading  members  of 
his  profession  in  the  state  and  has  been  honored  with  the  presidency  of  the 
Waterloo  Medical  Society  and  of  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society ;  he  is 
a  member  of  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Association  and  the  American  Medical 
Association. 

On  the  23d  of  August,  1898,  at  Hudson,  Dr.  McManus  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Mae  B.  Loonan,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Loonan,  and  they  have 
one  son,  Thomas  L.  In  his  political  views  Dr.  McManus  is  a  republican  but  not 
an  ofifice  seeker,  the  only  office  he  has  ever  filled  being  that  of  coroner  of  Black 
Hawk  county  for  two  terms,  from  1903  until  1907.  He  belongs  to  the  Commercial 
Club,  is  a  Master  Mason  and  a  Baptist — associations  which  indicate  much  of 
the  nature  of  his  interests  and  the  relations  which  govern  his  conduct.  He  is  a 
broad-minded,  progressive  and  public-spirited  man. 


F.  J.  LANDGRAF. 


F.  J.  Landgraf  is  well  known  as  a  druggist  of  Waterloo,  also  as  vice  president 
of  the  Armstrong  Manufacturing  Company  and  as  a  director  of  the  Security 
Savings  Bank.  The  drug  business  is  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of  Landgraf 
&  Company  and  is  one  of  the  leading  establishments  of  this  character  in  Black 
Hawk  county.  For  a  third  of  a  century  Mr.  Landgraf  has  lived  in  Waterloo  and 
his  many  sterling  traits  of  character  have  found  recognition  in  the  high  regard 
and  confidence  of  colleagues  and  contemporaries.  He  was  born  in  Cedar  Falls, 
Iowa,  in  1869,  a  son  of  Thomas  Landgraf,  who  arrived  at  that  place  in  the  early 
'50s.  He  was  a  pioneer  in  the  merchant-tailoring  business  at  Cedar  Falls  and 
there  he  continued  active  in  business  to  the  time  of  his  death,  winning  a  place 
among  the  leading  residents  of  the  city. 

F.  J.  Landgraf  spent  his  youthful  days  in  his  parents'  home  and  was  graduated 
from  the  East  Waterloo  high  school,  wherein  he  completed  his  more  specifically 
literary  education.  He  afterward  attended  the  College  of  Pharmacy  in  Phila- 
delphia and  still  later  was  graduated  from  the  Northwestern  College  of  Pharmacy 
in  Chicago,  thus  receiving  thorough  scientific  training  in  the  business  which  he 
wished  to  make  his  life  work.  He  afterward  was  employed  for  a  year  in  Le  Mars, 
Iowa,  and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  came  to  Waterloo.  He  has  since  been 
connected  with  the  drug  trade  of  this  city  and  in  1893  he  embarked  in  business 
on  his  own  account  in  the  same  room  which  he  now  occupies.  His  trade  has  in- 
creased year  by  year.  His  business  methods  have  always  been  such  as  will  bear 
the  closest  investigation  and  scrutiny  and  his  energy  and  enterprise  have  enabled 
him  to  overcome  all  the  difficulties  and  obstacles  in  his  path.  The  drug  house  of 
Landgraf  &  Company  is  one  of  the  most  popular  as  well  as  one  of  the  most  ex- 
tensive establishments  of  its  kind  in  the  city.  Its  neat  and  tasteful  arrangement 
renders  it  very  attractive,  while  the  honorable  business  methods  of  the  firm  com- 
mend it  to  the  support  of  the  public. 

Mr.  Landgraf  became  identified  with  the  manufacturing  interests  of  Waterloo 
about  twelve  years  ago  and  at  the  present  time  is  vice  president  of  the  Armstrong 


:^8  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Manufacturing  Company  and  is  one  of  the  oldest  stockholders  of  that  company. 
He  is  likewise  a  stockholder  in  the  Commercial  National  Bank  and  a  director  of 
the  Security  Savings  Bank.  His  investments  have  been  judiciously  made  and  have 
brought  gratifying  returns.  For  the  last  seven  years  Mr.  Landgraf  has  also  had 
charge  of  postal  station  No.  i  at  Waterloo. 

In  1891  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Landgraf  and  Miss  Jennie  \\'escott, 
of  Wisconsin,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  children,  Florence  and  Thomas. 
Mr.  Landgraf  is  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  an  Elk,  and  in  Masonry  he  has  attained 
the  Knights  Templar  degree  in  Ascalon  Commandery.  Well  defined  purpose  and 
laudable  ambition  have  brought  him  success  in  business  affairs,  while  attractive 
social  qualities  have  gained  for  him  the  high  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  has 
come  in  contact  in  other  relations. 


ROY  L.  STETZEL. 


Roy  L.  Stetzel  is  manager  of  the  ^^'aterloo  Office  Supply  Company,  a  business 
that  was  established  in  1909  by  R.  L.  and  F.  C.  Stetzel.  They  are  conducting 
both  a  wholesale  and  retail  business  in  office  fixtures  and  supplies  and  also  in 
stationery  and  the  enterprise  is  enjoying  a  steady  and  substantial  growth,  which 
indicates  the  reliable  business  methods  employed  by  the  firm.  During  the  eight 
years  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo,  Roy  L.  Stetzel  has  become  widely  and  favor- 
ably known  and  his  many  substantial  traits  of  character  have  gained  him  high 
regard.  Pennsylvania  numbers  him  among  her  native  sons,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  McEwensville  in  1878.  During  his  early  childhood  his  parents  removed 
with  their  family  to  South  Dakota,  where  the  period  of  his  youth  was  passed, 
while  the  public  schools  afforded  him  his  educational  privileges. 

After  leaving  school  Mr.  Stetzel  was  engaged  in  the  drug  and  jewelry  business 
in  Colman,  South  Dakota,  until  he  came  to  \\'aterloo  in  1906.  In  that  year  he 
went  upon  the  road  as  a  traveling  salesman  for  the  Waterloo  Skirt  &  Garment 
Company,  with  which  he  was  thus  connected  until  he  and  his  brother,  F.  C. 
Stetzel,  established  the  present  business  under  the  name  of  the  Waterloo  Office 
Supply  Company.  They  are  still  joint  owners,  but  Roy  L.  Stetzel  acts  as  manager. 
In  connection  with  the  sale  of  office  fixtures  and  supplies  they  have  a  bindery  and 
printing  department  at  No.  5i7>^  W^ater  street,  while  their  main  office  is  at  No.  18 
Bridge  street.  Both  branches  of  their  business  are  growing  steadily  and  bringing 
to  them  a  substantial  and  gratifying  profit. 

In  1909  Mr.  Stetzel  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Besse  Herriott,  of  Elm- 
wood,  Illinois,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children.  Sidney  W.  and  Ruth 
Herriott.  The  parents  are  members  01  the  First  Presbyterian  church,  taking  an 
active  interest  in  its  work  and  contributing  generously  to  its  support. 

Mr.  Stetzel  is  well  known  as  a  Mason  and  has  attained  the  Knight  Templar 
degree  in  Ascalon  Commandery.  Although  born  in  the  east,  the  greater  part  of 
his  life  has  been  spent  on  this  side  the  Mississippi  and  he  possesses  the  spirit  of 
enterprise  and  progress  which  has  been  the  dominant  factor  in  the  upbuilding  of 
the  west.  In  all  of  his  business  career  determination  has  enabled  him  to  over- 
come difficulties  and  obstacles  and  as  a  business  man  he  is  conspicuous  among  his 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  39 

associates,  not  only  for  his  success,  but  for  probity,  fairness  and  the  honorable 
methods  which  he  has  followed.  In  everything  he  has  been  eminently  practical 
and  this  has  been  manifest  not  only  in  his  business  undertakings,  but  also  in  his 
social  and  private  life. 


C.  F.  ALTSTADT. 


C.  F.  Altstadt  is  the  president  and  manager  of  the  Altstadt  &  Langlas  Baking 
Company  of  Waterloo,  which  is  conducting  a  wholesale  and  retail  business,  and 
which  is  the  largest  concern  of  the  kind  in  Black  Hawk  county.  The  business 
has  been  in  continuous  existence  for  twelve  years.  Mr.  Altstadt  is  a  native  of 
Iowa,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Franklin  county  in  1875.  There  the  period  of 
his  boyhood  and  youth  was  passed  to  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  when  he  left  Iowa 
and  went  to  Texas,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  restaurant  business.  After  a 
few  years,  however,  he  removed  to  this  state  and  settled  at  Waverly,  where  he 
lived  until  he  came  to  Waterloo  in  1900.  Throughout  the  intervening  period  he 
has  been  connected  with  the  bakery  business  in  this  city  and  has  been  an  active 
guiding  spirit  in  the  development  of  an  enterprise  that  is  today  one  of  large  pro- 
portions and  constitutes  a  factor  in  the  prosperity  of  the  county. 

The  Altstadt  &  Langlas  Baking  Company  has  a  large  plant  at  the  corner  of 
Mulberry  and  Elm  streets,  where  it  has  a  two-story  brick  building,  the  dimen- 
sions of  the  building  being  one  hundred  and  thirty  feet  square.  The  daily 
capacity  is  about  twenty-five  thousand  loaves  of  bread,  two  thousand  pies  and 
fifteen  thousand  dozen  of  cookies  and  other  small  goods.  About  fourteen  thou- 
sand pounds  of  flour  are  used  annually  and  there  are  about  sixty  employes.  The^ 
company  utilizes  eight  wagons  and  three  auto  trucks  in  delivery  and  ships  its 
goods  to  about  eighty  dififerent  towns  and  cities.  The  business  was  incorporated 
in  1906  and  was  capitalized  for  eighty  thousand  dollars,  with  Mr.  Altstadt  as  the 
president  and  manager  and  Mr.  Langlas  as  the  secretary  and  treasurer.  From  the 
beginning  the  enterprise  has  grown  and  prospered  and  today  the  volume  of  busi- 
ness makes  the  Altstadt  &  Langlas  Baking  Company  one  of  the  most  important 
manufacturing  enterprises  of  Waterloo.  In  addition  to  his  other  interests  Mr. 
Altstadt  is  a  director  of  the  German-American  Life  Insurance  Company  of 
Burlington. 

In  1902,  Mr.  Altstadt  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Langlas  and 
they  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children,  Louis  E.  and  Charlotte  E.  Mr. 
Altstadt  belongs  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Commercial  Club 
and  Board  of  Trade,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Evangelical  church, 
in  the  work  of  which  they  take  a  most  active  and  helpful  interest.  Mr.  Altstadt 
is  serving  on  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  church  and  he  cooperates  in  many 
measures  and  movements  for  the  uplift  and  benefit  of  humanity.  He  is  now  serv- 
ing as  a  member  of  the  board  of  education  of  the  East  Waterloo  schools.  He  is 
also  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Western  Old  People's  Home  and 
is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Laymen's  Missionary  Movement.  His  life  has  ever 
been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles  and  the  ideals  which  he  has  cher- 
ished have  found  expression  in  practical  efforts  for  their  fulfillment.    He  is  a  man 


40  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

of  broad  sympathies  and  the  poor  and  needy  have  found  in  him  a  friend.  His  Hfe 
has  indeed  been  one  of  usefulness,  not  only  on  account  of  his  business  affairs,  but 
also  on  account  of  -his  recognition  of  the  brotherhood  of  man  and  his  efforts  to 
ameliorate  the  hard  conditions  of  life  for  the  unfortunate. 


EMMONS  JOHNSON. 


One  who  is  a  keen  judge  of  human  nature  has  said  that  Emmons  Johnson  "is 
one  of  the  most  prominent  business  men  of  Waterloo.  He  ranks  at  the  top  so- 
cially, financially  and  morally."  It  is  not  the  province  of  biography  to  give  voice 
to  a  man's  modest  estimate  of  himself  and  his  accomplishments  but  rather  to 
leave  the  record  establishing  his  position  to  the  consensus  of  public  opinion,  and 
judged  in  this  light  it  is  safe  to  characterize  Emmons  Johnson  as  one  of  the 
foremost  citizens  of  Black  Hawk  county.  He  has  been  prominently  identified 
with  commercial  interests  of  the  state  and  for  many  years  has  been  actively 
engaged  in  the  banking  business,  being  now  president  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson 
Trust  Company  and  president  of  the  Waterloo  Savings  Bank.  He  is  almost  an 
octogenarian  yet  remains  an  active  factor  in  the  business  world.  He  was  bom 
January  23,  1835,  in  Ellicottville,  New  York,  a  son  of  Elisha  and  Herma  (Jewett) 
Johnson,  the  former  a  native  of  New  York  and  the  latter  of  Connecticut.  The 
father  also  reached  an  advanced  age,  passing  away  in  1870. 

In  early  boyhood  Emmons  Johnson  attended  the  schools  of  Ashford  and  Otto, 
New  York,  embracing  every  opportunity  to  acquire  an  education  up  to  the  time 
he  reached  the  age  of  twenty-two  or  twenty-three  years.  For  a  time  he  was  a 
student  in  academies  at  Springville  and  Fredonia,  New  York,  and  for  one  term 
attended  Brown  University  at  Providence,  Rhode  Island.  Mr.  Johnson  was  a 
young  man  of  twenty-five  years  when  he  sought  the  opportunities  of  the  growing 
west,  making  his  way  in  i860  to  W^aterloo,  where  he  has  spent  most  of  the  time 
since,  although  he  made  his  home  in  Independence,  Iowa,  for  a  time,  was  also  a 
resident  of  Evanston,  Illinois,  for  a  year  and  although  from  1864  until  1870  he 
was  engaged  in  the  banking  business  in  Waverly.  Following  his  arrival  here  he 
became  connected  with  the  grain  and  lumber  trades  and  was  associated  with  C.  A. 
Farwell  in  building  the  first  grain  elevator  at  Waterloo,  which  he  afterward 
operated.  He  also  conducted  a  grain  business  at  Independence,  Iowa,  where  he 
made  his  home  for  a  few  months,  also  owning  the  first  elevator  in  that  place. 
For  a  year  he  conducted  a  grain  commission  business  in  Chicago  and  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  making  his  home  in  Evanston  during  that 
period.  Removing  to  Waverly  in  1864,  he  there  established  the  first  bank  in 
Bremer  county,  remaining  its  owner  until  1870,  when  he  sold  out  to  a  stock  com- 
pany and  returned  to  Waterloo  to  become  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Leavitt,  Johnson 
&;  Lusch,  conducting  a  private  banking  business.  After  six  years  Mr.  Lusch  sold 
out  to  his  partners  and  the  firm  continued  as  Leavitt  &  Johnson  until  1898,  when 
the  business  was  reorganized  into  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank.  Although 
the  name  of  Mr.  Johnson  is  continued  he  is  not  connected  with  that  institution 
at  present.  In  1902  he  organized  the  Waterloo  Savings  Bank,  in  which  he  owns 
two-thirds  of  the  stock. 


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HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  43 

In  1891  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  Trust  Company  was  organized  to  conduct  the 
farm  loan  department  of  the  business  which  had  formerly  been  carried  on  by  the 
banking  firm  of  Leavitt  &  Johnson,  and  to  this  Mr.  Johnson  has  since  devoted  his 
time.  In  1898  he  purchased  the  entire  interest  of  Mr.  Leavitt  in  the  trust  com- 
pany and  has  since  directed  its  affairs,  which  are  in  excellent  condition,  the  volume 
of  business  having  greatly  increased  under  his  care.  The  company  does  prob- 
ably the  largest  farm  loan  business  in  the  state,  having  a  large  clientage  in  most 
of  the  counties  of  northwestern  Iowa.  In  1903  Mr.  Johnson  purchased  stock 
in  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waverly  to  the  amount  of  sixty-four  hundred 
shares — nearly  two-thirds  of  the  stock.  This  bank  is  capitalized  for  one  hundred 
thousand  dollars  and  is  the  successor  to  the  bank  which  Mr.  Johnson  established 
in  Waverly  in  1864.  Every  phase  of  the  banking  business  is  familiar  to  him  and 
in  the  conduct  of  the  Trust  Company  and  of  the  Waterloo  Savings  Bank  he  has 
displayed  sound  judgment  and  unfaltering  energy.  He  holds  considerable  real 
estate  in  Waterloo  and  his  investments  have  always  been  judiciously  made, 
bringing  to  him  substantial  success.  He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose,  carry- 
ing forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes.  He  has  displayed 
marked  ability  in  combining  and  coordinating  seemingly  diverse  elements  into  a 
unified  and  harmonious  whole  and  his  life  record  constitutes  an  example  that 
might  be  profitably  followed  by  many  others,  showing  what  may  be  accomplished 
when  enterprise  and  energy  point  out  the  way. 

On  the  27th  of  October,  1859,  at  Morrisville,  New  York,  Mr.  Johnson  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lucy  Leland,  of  that  place,  and  they  became  the  parents 
of  six  children :  Elbert  Leland,  who  is  now  vice  president  of  the  Leavitt  &  John- 
son Trust  Company,  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waverly  and  vice 
president  of  the  Waterloo  Savings  Bank,  and  who  in  1914  was  elected  a  director 
of  the  Federal  Reserve  Bank  at  Chicago;  Lewis  E.,  engineer  for  the  bridge  and 
construction  department  of  the  Pennsylvania  Steel  Company,  at  Steelton,  Penn- 
sylvania ;  Allan  Jewett,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eighteen  months ;  Marion  L.,  now 
the  widow  of  J.  D.  Easton ;  Walter  E.,  a  resident  of  Nampa,  Idaho,  engaged  in 
farming;  and  Alice  Lucy,  the  wife  of  David  H.  McKee,  of  Des  Moines.  The  wife 
and  mother  passed  away  in  March,  1892.  On  the  28th  of  March,  1895,  Mr.  John- 
son married  Mrs.  Ella  H.  C.  Kellogg,  of  Rochester,  New  York. 

Mr.  Johnson  holds  membership  with  the  Congregational  church  and  also  with 
the  Masonic  fraternity.  His  political  allegiance  was  formerly  given  to  the  re- 
publican party  but  since  the  formation  of  the  progressive  party  he  has  been  a 
supporter  of  its  principles.  While  living  in  Waverly  he  was  elected  state  senator 
from  Bremer  county,  continuing  in  that  position  until  his  removal  to  Waterloo, 
when  he  resigned.  He  has  ever  been  deeply  interested  in  the  upbuilding  and  wel- 
fare of  the  community  in  which  he  makes  his  home  and  has  generously  contributed 
to  many  projects  for  the  public  good.  Last  year  he  gave  Cornell  College  $29,000. 
His  fellow  townsmen,  recognizing  the  wisdom  of  his  judgment,  do  not  hesitate 
to  follow  his  example.  It  is  seldom  that  one  of  his  years  remains  so  active  in 
business,  but  old  age  need  not  necessarily  suggest  idleness  or  want  of  occupation. 
On  the  contrary  there  is  an  old  age  which  grows  stronger  and  broader  mentally 
and  morally  as  the  years  go  by  and  yields  out  of  its  rich  stores  of  wisdom  and 
experience  for  the  benefit  of  others.  Such  is  the  record  of  Mr.  Johnson.  Through- 
out his  entire  life  he  has  never  made  engagements  that  he  has  not  kept  nor  in- 

Vol.  II— 3 


44  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

curred  obligations  that  he  has  not  met.  Not  only  has  he  never  taken  any  ad- 
vantage of  those  with  whom  he  has  transacted  business,  but  it  has  never  been 
hinted  that  in  any  matter  he  has  ever  consummated  any  trade  to  the  hurt  or  dis- 
advantage of  the  other  party.  He  is  everywhere  recognized  as  the  soul  of  busi- 
ness integrity  and  honor  and  no  citizen  of  Waterloo  is  held  in  higher  esteem  than 
Emmons  Johnson,  who  since  1870  has  been  numbered  among  the  bankers  of 
the  city. 


HUGH  G.  VAN  PELT. 


Hugh  G.  Van  Pelt  is  one  of  Iowa's  best  known  men  and  his  acquaintance  and 
reputation  extend  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada.  He  is  the  secretary 
and  general  manager  of  the  Dairy  Cattle  Congress,  one  of  the  most  noted  or- 
ganizations of  the  kind  on  the  American  continent.  It  owes  its  existence  to  Mr. 
Van  Pelt,  who  planned  and  established  the  organization  while  he  was  dairy  ex- 
pert for  the  state  of  Iowa.  Important  and  extensive  as  have  been  his  efforts  in 
promoting  the  dairy  interests  of  the  country,  he  has  also  been  active  in  other 
business  connections  and  is  now  the  president  of  the  Shoemaker- Van  Pelt-Mayne 
Company  and  vice  president  of  the  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company.  A  modern  philoso- 
pher has  said:  "Not  the  good  that  comes  to  us,  but  the  good  that  comes  to  the 
world  through  us.  is  the  measure  of  our  success;"  and  judged  by  this  standard, 
Mr.  Van  Pelt  has  been  a  most  successful  man,  for  his  life  work  has  been  of  almost 
inestimable  value  to  others.  He  has  a  strong  character  and  one  that  inspires  con- 
fidence in  his  fellowmen,  and  he  is  capable  of  mature  judgment  of  his  own 
capacities  and  of  the  people  and  circumstances  that  make  up  his  life  contacts 
and  experiences. 

A  native  son  of  Iowa,  Mr.  Van  Pelt  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  public 
schools  and  afterward  entered  the  State  Agricultural  College,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  class  of  1903.  He  had  charge  of  the  American  Jersey  Cattle 
Club  exhibit  at  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition  at  St.  Louis,  which  was  the 
winning  herd  in  the  butter  production  test  at  that  great  exposition.  He  after- 
ward had  charge  of  the  A.  O.  Auten  farm  at  Jerseyville,  Illinois,  for  a  year  and 
was  then  given  charge  of  the  Hartman  herd  at  Columbus,  Ohio.  From  there  he 
was  called  to  the  Iowa  Agricultural  College  and  was  made  professor  of  the  dairy 
husbandry  department  and  manager  of  the  state  dairy  farm,  continuing  in  that 
connection  from  1906  until  1909.  In  the  latter  year,  the  Iowa  state  legislature 
having  made  an  appropriation  to  be  used  in  the  development  of  the  dairy  interests 
of  the  state,  yir.  Van  Pelt  was  given  charge  of  this  work  and  while  thus  engaged 
he  ran  special  dairy  trains  carrying  dairy  cattle  and  dairy  products,  together  with 
expert  lecturers,  to  practically  every  town  of  any  size  in  Iowa  that  was  located 
upon  a  railroad.  He  devoted  three  years  to  his  duties  in  that  position,  since  which 
time  he  has  been  prominently  identified  with  the  same  line  of  work,  lecturing  at 
many  dairy  cattle  shows  and  judging  dairy  stock  in  many  of  the  largest  cities  of 
the  United  States  and  Canada.  In  fact,  he  is  recognized  as  the  superior  of  all 
others  in  this  line  on  the  American  continent.  He  has  made  a  close  study  of 
dairy  stock  and  of  every  feature  of  the  business  and  his  opinions  are  everv where 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  45 

accepted  as  authority,  so  that  today  he  is  one  of  the  foremost  representatives  of 
the  dairy  interests  in  all  the  country.  Aside  from  this  he  has  other  important 
business  connections  and  investments  as  the  president  of  the  Shoemaker-Van  Pelt- 
Mayne  Company  and  vice  president  of  the  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company  of  Water- 
loo. The  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company  publishes  the  National  Dairy  Publication, 
Kimball's  Dairy  Farmer,  The  Creamery  Journal,  The  Milk  Trade  Journal  and 
The  Egg  Reporter,  papers  which,  as  their  names  signify,  are  for  the  promotion 
of  special  business  lines  and  which  are  national  in  character. 

In  1906,  Mr.  Van  Pelt  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Stella  Calhoon,  of 
Indianola,  Iowa.  They  have  a  wide  acquaintance  and  their  circle  of  friends  is 
almost  coextensive  therewith.  Mr.  Van  Pelt  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial 
Club  and  Board  of  Trade  of  Waterloo,  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Water- 
loo Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club.  In  fact,  he  is  one  of  the  most  progressive, 
enterprising  residents  of  the  city  and  is  active  in  every  plan  and  movement  toward 
making  a  greater  Waterloo  and  enhancing  the  opportunities  of  the  state. 


WILLIAM  L.  FOSTER. 


Starting  out  in  the  business  world  on  his  own  account  at  the  age  of  fifteen 
years,  William  L.  Foster  is  today  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Ellis  &  Foster,  con- 
ducting a  successful  and  growing  plumbing  business  in  Waterloo.  Industry,  well 
defined  and  intelligently  directed,  has  brought  him  to  his  present  trade  con- 
nections. He  was  born  in  Waverly,  Iowa,  on  the  8th  of  December,  1872,  a  son 
of  Floyd  W.  and  Rebecca  (Doyle)  Foster.  His  paternal  grandfather,  Peter 
Foster,  was  of  Pennsylvania-Dutch  stock  and  in  an  early  day  in  the  development 
of  this  state  came  to  Iowa,  being  among  the  first  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of 
Waverly.  He  built  the  first  mill  above  Waverly  ever  erected  on  the  Cedar  river 
and  was  otherwise  identified  with  the  early  development  of  that  section.  Floyd 
W,  Foster  was  a  carpenter  by  trade  and  followed  that  occupation  throughout  his 
entire  life,  which  was  terminated  in  death  in  1893,  when  he  was  fifty-five  years 
of  age.  He  was  a  member  of  Company  G,  Ninth  Jowa  Volunteer  Infantry,  was 
elected  first  lieutenant,  served  as  captain  of  his  company  on  the  death  of  his 
captain  and  was  himself  wounded.  His  wife  passed  away  November  15,  191 1, 
at  the  age  of  fifty-eight  years. 

William  L.  Foster  acquired  a  public-school  education,  but  at  the  age  of  fifteen 
years  started  out  to  make  his  own  way  in  the  world  by  learning  the  tinner's  trade. 
Subsequently  he  was  employed  in  connection  with  the  cigar  business  in  Maquo- 
keta,  Iowa,  for  three  years,  but  after  the  outbreak  of  the  Spanish-American  war 
he  enlisted  for  active  service  at  the  front  and  was  made  cjuartermaster  sergeant 
of  the  Forty-ninth  Regiment  of  Iowa  Volunteer  Infantry,  which  was  on  duty 
in  Cuba. 

After  the  close  of  the  war  Mr.  Foster  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  corrals 
of  the  Gulf  division  of  the  army,  serving  in  that  capacity  for  six  months.  He 
then  returned  to  Maquoketa,  where  for  a  year  he  conducted  a  restaurant.  In 
1900  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  in  company  with  his  brother-in-law,  R.  A.  Ellis, 
established  the  plumbing  firm  of  Ellis  &  Foster.    In  the  intervening  period  to  the 


46  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

present  time,  covering  fourteen  years,  they  have  built  up  one  of  the  largest  plumb- 
ing establishments  in  Waterloo,  having  a  very  extensive  and  gratifying  patronage. 
They  employ  expert  workmen  and  at  all  times  meet  the  demands  of  their  patrons, 
while  their  honorable  business  dealing  constitutes  a  substantial  factor  in  their 
growing  success. 

On  the  1st  of  March,  1900,  Mr.  Foster  was  married  to  Miss  Netta  I.  Mc- 
Donald, of  Maquoketa.  He  belongs  to  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  6,  K.  P.,  and  Waterloo 
Lodge,  No.  290,  B.  P.  O.  E.,  and  also  to  the  Royal  Arcanum.  He  is  likewise  a 
member  of  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club  and  in  matters  of  general  concern  he 
manifests  a  public  spirit,  cooperating  heartily  in  plans  and  measures  for  the  good 
of  the  community.  There  have  been  no  spectacular  phases  in  his  life  record. 
On  the  contrary  it  is  that  of  a  man  who  has  always  followed  along  the  even  tenor 
of  his  way,  finding  in  business  conditions  the  incentive  for  his  best  efforts,  and  as 
the  years  have  gone  on  he  has  gained  a  substantial  measure  of  success. 


WALTER  R.  FRENCH. 


Walter  R.  French,  with  offices  in  the  Commercial  Bank  building,  is  one  of 
the  younger  representatives  of  the  bar  of  Black  Hawk  county.  He  located  for 
practice  in  Waterloo  in  1912  and  already  has  achieved  a  measure  of  success  which 
many  an  older  practitioner  might  well  envy.  He  was  born  in  the  city  which  is 
still  his  home,  a  son  of  Wallace  R.  French,  who  came  to  Waterloo  about  thirty 
years  ago  and  for  a  number  of  years  was  actively  and  successfully  engaged  in 
merchandising  in  this  city,  but  is  now  living  retired,  enjoying  in  well  earned  rest 
the  fruits  of  his  former  toil.  Wallace  French  has  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the 
public  affairs  of  city  and  county  and  his  cooperation  has  been  an  element  in  public 
progress.  He  served  on  the  board  of  aldermen  for  a  number  of  years  and  as  such 
did  effective  work  in  advancing  the  welfare  of  the  city  along  civic  lines. 

His  son,  Walter  R.  French,  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  system  of  Water- 
loo for  his  educational  opportunities  and  after  passing  through  the  grades  he  con- 
tinued his  course  in  the  East  Waterloo  high  school,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  class  of  1907.  He  then  entered  upon  the  liberal  arts  course  at  the  North- 
western University  at  Evanston,  Illinois,  and  returned  to  Iowa  for  professional 
training,  being  graduated  from  the  law  department  of  the  State  University  with 
the  class  of  191 2.  The  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  has  since 
practiced  in  all  of  the  state  and  federal  courts.  His  clientage  is  continually  in- 
creasing in  volume  and  importance  and  has  already  assumed  gratifying  propor- 
tions. He  is  a  member  of  both  the  Black  Hawk  County  and  the  Iowa  State  Bar 
Associations. 

Mr.  French  has  also  taken  a  somewhat  prominent  part  in  political  affairs  and 
as  the  nominee  of  the  republican  party  was  elected  for  the  office  of  justice  of 
the  peace  in  East  Waterloo  township.  He  is  a  trustee  of  Black  Hawk  county  for 
minor  dependents  under  the  new  Employers'  Liability  and  Workmen's  Compensa- 
tion Act  of  the  state  and  in  all  matters  of  citizenship  he  is  deeply  interested,  feeling 
it  the  duty  as  well  as  the  privilege  of  every  man  to  exercise  his  right  of  franchise 
in  support  of  the  projects  which  he  deems  of  greatest  benefit  to  the  common- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  47 

wealth  at  large.  He  has  frequently  been  a  delegate  to  the  county  and  state  con- 
ventions of  the  republican  party.  Mr.  French  has  membership  with  two  college 
fraternities,  the  Sigma  Chi  and  Theta  Nu  Epsilon.  Locally  he  is  connected  with 
the  Elks  and  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  and  his  religious  faith  is  evidenced  in 
his  attendance  at  Christ's  Episcopal  church.  He  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club 
and  Board  of  Trade  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Clubs.  Having  spent 
his  entire  life  in  this  county  he  is  widely  known  and  the  many  sterling  traits  of 
character  he  has  displayed  have  established  him  in  the  regard  of  his  fellow 
townsmen. 


JOHN  BERG. 


John  Berg  is  the  secretary  and  vice  president  of  the  B.  W.  Schuneman  Com- 
pany, druggists,  of  Waterloo.  He  began  preparation  for  the  calling  to  which  he 
now  devotes  his  energies  in  his  sixteenth  year  and  one  element  of  his  success  is 
undoubtedly  the  fact  that  he  has  never  dissipated  his  energies,  but  has  always 
continued  in  the  line  to  which  he  directed  his  attention  in  early  youth.  He  was 
born  in  Savanna,  Illinois,  on  the  loth  of  July,  1888,  a  son  of  Peter  and  Ida  (Dahl) 
Berg,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germany,  the  former  coming  to  the  United 
States  when  a  young  man  of  twenty-four  years,  while  the  latter  crossed  the 
Atlantic  when  a  maiden  of  sixteen  summers.  They  were  married  in  Clinton, 
Iowa.  After  coming  to  the  new  world  Peter  Berg  first  settled  in  Sabula,  Iowa, 
in  1869  and  there  engaged  in  contracting  and  building,  with  which  he  was  identi- 
fied throughout  his  active  life.  At  the  present,  however,  he  is  living  retired  in 
Waterloo,  enjoying  in  well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil. 

John  Berg  supplemented  a  public-school  education  by  study  in  the  Iowa  State 
Teachers'  College  at  Cedar  Falls  and  in  the  Babcock  School  of  Pharmacy  at  Des 
Moines,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  191 2.  As  early  as  his 
sixteenth  year,  however,  he  had  taken  up  the  study  of  pharmacy  as  a  clerk  in 
the  store  of  the  Pfeififer  Company  in  Cedar  Falls,  remaining  in  that  employ  up 
to  the  time  he  entered  the  pharmaceutical  school.  Following  his  graduation  he 
returned  to  Black  Hawk  county  and  for  six  months  was  employed  in  the  east 
side  store  of  the  B.  W.  Schuneman  Company  in  Waterloo.  In  December  he 
purchased  an  interest  in  the  business  and  was  made  vice  president  and  secretary 
of  the  company,  at  which  time  he  assumed  the  management  of  the  west  side  store, 
over  which  he  has  since  presided.  He  is  thoroughly  acquainted  with  every  phase 
of  the  drug  business  and  has  made  his  establishment  a  popular  one  by  reason 
of  the  attractive  appearance  of  the  place,  the  reasonable  prices  and  the  unfailing 
courtesy  which  he  extends  to  his  patrons. 

Mr.  Berg  is  a  member  of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Taber- 
nacle Chapter,  No.  52,  R.  A.  M. ;  Waterloo  Council,  R.  &  S.  M. ;  Ascalon  Com- 
mandery.  No.  25,  K.  T. ;  and  El  Kahir  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.  He  also 
belongs  to  the  Lutheran  church  and  in  his  religious  and  Masonic  connections 
are  found  the  rules  which  govern  his  conduct  and  which  have  won  for  him  the 
high  regard  and  confidence  of  his  fellowmen.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Waterloo  Commercial  Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club,  and  he  gives  his  political 


48  '  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

allegiance  to  the  republican  parly.  His  life  has  been  one  of  intense  activity,  in- 
telligently directed,  and  he  has  found  in  the  faithful  performance  of  each  day's 
duties  inspiration  and  strength  for  the  efforts  of  the  succeeding  day.  He  is  alert, 
energetic  and  determined  and  as  the  years  have  passed  has  won  a  substantial 
measure  of  success,  occupying  a  prominent  place  among  the  druggists  of 
Waterloo. 


RUPERT  L.  PARKER. 


Rupert  L.  Parker  is  the  president  of  the  Colby-Parker  Transfer  Line,  in  which 
connection  he  is  conducting  the  leading  business  of  the  kind  in  Waterloo.  He 
has  been  a  resident  of  this  city  for  seven  years,  arriving  in  1907,  and  within  that 
period  has  won  for  himself  a  creditable  name  and  place  in  business  circles.  A 
native  of  New  York,  his  birth  occurred  in  Cattaraugus  county  on  the  226.  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1878,  and  at  the  age  of  ten  years  he  accompanied  his  parents,  Elliott  and 
Rosethalia  Parker,  to  the  middle  west.  They  settled  in  Decorah,  Iowa,  and  there 
Rupert  L.  Parker  was  reared  and  acquired  his  education  as  a  public-school  student. 
He  continued  to  make  his  home  in  Decorah  until  he  had  reached  the  age  of  twenty- 
nine  years,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo.  Previously  he  had  engaged  in  dealing  in 
standard  bred  horses,  which  he  handled  and  trained  successfully.  On  coming  to 
Waterloo  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Charles  H.  Colby  and  bought  out  the 
Stewart  Transfer  Line,  establishing  the  Colby-Parker  Transfer  Line.  From  the 
beginning  the  enterprise  has  proven  a  growing  and  profitable  one  and  they  now 
own  and  control  the  most  extensive  business  of  the  kind  in  Waterloo,  using  forty 
horses  in  teaming  and  contract  work.  They  employ  thirty  men  and  their  patron- 
age is  steadily  increasing,  for  they  are  ever  found  to  be  prompt  and  reliable,  living 
up  fully  to  their  contract.  Mr.  Parker  has  also  trained  a  number  of  horses  since 
coming  to  Waterloo  and  is  very  successful  in  that  work. 

In  1905  Mr.  Parker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ruth  James,  of  Fort 
Dodge,  Iowa,  by  whom  he  has  one  daughter,  Jane.  The  parents  are  members  of 
St.  Mark's  Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Parker  is  serving  as  one  of  the  vestrymen. 
He  is  also  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Industry  and 
determination  have  been  the  basic  elements  of  his  business  cai'eer  and  have 
brought  to  him  a  substantial  measure  of  success  as  the  years  have  gone  by. 


MOSES  RICKER. 


Moses  Ricker  was  born  at  Winterport,  ]\Iaine,  September  25,  1837,  and  in  his 
native  state  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  was  passed.  Just  before  he  had 
attained  his  majority  he  left  New  England  for  the  Pacific  coast,  making  the  trip 
around  Cape  Horn  to  Marysville,  California,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of 
Governor  Lowe.  Ambitious,  however,  to  advance  his  individual  interests,  he 
went  to  the  mining  camps  and  for  a  time  conducted  business  affairs  at  Virginia 
City  and  later  at  White  Pine,  Nevada,  remaining  in  the  two  states  until   i86^ 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  49 

when  he  returned  to  the  Atlantic  coast  and  with  the  proceeds  of  his  business 
successes  in  the  west  he  embarked  in  the  dry-goods  trade  in  Boston  in  partner- 
ship with  a  brother.  He  also  became  connected  with  a  commission  business  and 
after  some  years  spent  in  Boston  remained  for  a  year  in  New  York  to  further  the 
interests  of  his  commission  business.  His  attention,  however,  was  from  time  to 
time  riveted  on  the  west  and  south  in  recognition  of  the  growing  opportunities 
of  those  sections  of  the  country,  and  in  1870  he  went  to  Vicksburg,  Mississippi, 
remaining  three  months,  but  not  finding  the  business  openings  that  he  desired 
there,  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  made  his  home  to  the  time  of  his  death. 
He  was  first  connected  with  the  dry-goods  business  in  this  city,  having  brought  a 
large  stock  of  goods  from  Boston  for  that  purpose  and  organizing  the  firm  of 
Ricker,  Russ  &  Company,  which  began  business  in  a  frame  building.  After  a 
brief  period  the  store  and  stock  were  destroyed  by  fire,  but  with  undaunted  pur- 
pose and  unwavering  resolution  they  started  anew,  this  time  occupying  a  brick 
building  on  the  site  of  the  First  National  ,Bank  building.  At  dififerent  times 
•removals  were  made  in  order  to  secure  needed  space  and  ultimately  the  firm  of 
Ricker,  Russ  &  Company  extended  the  scope  of  their  trade  to  include  millinery 
as  well  as  dry  goods. 

In  1873,  Mr.  Ricker  also  entered  into  active  connection  with  the  lumber  trade, 
purchasing  the  interest  of  the  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  AUee  &  Lindley,  thus 
forming  the  firm  of  Ricker  &  Lindley.  The  association  between  them  was  con- 
tinued with  mutual  pleasure  and  profit  until  1885,  when  Mr.  Ricker  purchased  his 
partner's  interest  and  continued  alone  until  1888,  when  he  admitted  Charles  P. 
Bratnober  to  a  partnership  under  the  firm  name  of  Ricker  &  Bratnober.  He 
believed  in  the  introduction  of  new  ideas  into  an  old  established  business  and  in 
selecting  a  young  man  to  become  a  factor  in  the  conduct  of  the  lumber  trade  he 
had  the  prescience  to  choose  wisely.  Prosperity  attended  the  new  firm  and  the 
business  of  the  house  was  extended  in  many  directions.  In  1893  it  was>  incor- 
porated as  the  Ricker  &  Bratnober  Lumber  Company  and  W.  M.  Stewart,  a 
young  man  thoroughly  familiar  with  the  lumber  trade  and  of  large  business 
capacity,  was  admitted  to  a  partnership.  Later  the  retail  business  in  Waterloo 
was  abandoned,  but  the  firm  continued  to  sell  to  the  retail  trade  through  twenty- 
eight  yards  established  in  other  towns.  The  lumber  business  of  which  Mr.  Ricker 
was  long  the  head  first  began  to  branch  out  in  1889,  when  the  original  outside 
yard  was  established. 

In  addition  to  organizing  the  Ricker  &  Bratnober  Lumber  Company,  Mr. 
Ricker  was  also  instrumental  in  establishing  the  B.  L.  Willis  Lumber  Company, 
each  organization  having  the  same  stockholders.  They  established  and  conducted 
not  only  the  twenty-eight  retail  lumber  yards  in  Iowa,  but  also  engaged  exten- 
sively in  a  wholesale  lumber  business  and  in  the  operation  of  sawmills.  These 
firms  began  cutting  lumber  in  the  northern  pineries  in  1894  and  greatly  extended 
their  sawmill  operations,  buying  new  tracts  of  timber  lands  through  the  suc- 
ceeding years,  Mr.  Ricker  ever  manifesting  the  deepest  interest  in  that  branch 
of  the  business.  He  also  became  a  factor  in  other  important  industrial,  commer- 
cial and  financial  enterprises  of  Waterloo  as  a  stockholder,  and  there  are  few  who 
have  contributed  in  so  large  a  measure  to  the  business  development  of  the  city. 
Moreover,  from  the  period  of  his  early  residence  in  California  he  was  greatly 
attached  to  that  state  and  watched  its  progress  and  rapid  strides  in  population 


50  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  prosperity.  While  engaged  in  business  in  Waterloo  in  partnership  with 
Hervey  Lindley  they  formulated  the  plan  of  founding  a  town  in  California  and 
the  now  flourishing  city  of  Whittier  has  resulted  from  their  efforts,  the  initial 
step  in  that  direction  being  made  in  1886  or  1887. 

On  the  14th  of  May,  1873,  ^^-  Ricker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jennie 
Conger,  a  daughter  of  Major  Patrick  Henry  Conger,  of  Waterloo,  and  unto  them 
were  born  three  children :  Two  sons  who  died  in  infancy,  and  a  daughter.  Nina, 
who  is  now  the  wife  of  Lore  Alford  of  the  lilack  Hawk  Abstract  Company  of 
Waterloo.  Only  about  two  months  before  his  death  Mr.  Ricker  erected  a  fine 
residence  in  Waterloo  and  watched  with  interest  the  progress  of  the  work  as  the 
building  proceeded.  For  some  years  prior  to  his  death  it  was  Mr.  Ricker's  custom 
to  escape  the  rigorous  climate  of  Iowa  by  extended  visits  in  California,  Louisiana 
or  Florida.  He  preferred  the  first  named  state,  however,  finding  the  greatest 
enjoyment  in  its  sunshine,  its  fruits  and  its  flowers. 

Mr.  Ricker  was  a  well  known  Mason,  holding  membership  in  the  lodge,  chapter 
and  commandery.  and  when  he  passed  away  on  the  i6th  of  December,  1900,  his 
funeral  services  were  conducted  by  the  Knights  Templar.  He  was  also  a  member 
of  the  Elks'  lodge  and  of  the  Workmen  and  there  was  no  more  popular  or  honored 
man  in  those  organizations.  The  most  flourishing  club  ever  organized  in  Water- 
loo was  the  result  of  his  efforts  in  the  direction  of  establishing  a  business  men's 
association  and  furnishing  quarters  in  which  to  meet.  This  is  the  Columbia  Club, 
which  was  organized  in  1891  and  of  which  he  became  the  first  president. 


FRANCIS  A.  BRYANT.  M.  D. 

Dr.  Francis  A.  Bryant,  deceased,  was  for  an  extended  period  identified  with 
the  practice  of  medicine  in  Black  Hawk  county  and  the  record  which  he  left  be- 
hind him  as  a  man  and  a  citizen  is  one  well  worthy  of  emulation.  He  was  bom 
in  Chesterfield.  Massachusetts,  January  6,  1826.  a  son  of  Martin  and  Nancy 
(Skiff)  Bryant,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Massachusetts.  The  son  attended 
school  in  North  Adams,  Massachusetts,  and  then,  determining  upon  the  practice 
of  medicine  as  a  life  work,  became  a  pupil  in  a  medical  college  at  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  and  also  studied  in  Syracuse,  New  York.  He  entered  upon  the 
practice  of  his  profession  in  Pittsfield,  Massachusetts,  and  afterward  removed  to 
Wyoming,  New  York,  where  he  remained  for  five  years.  In  1858  he  came  to 
Cedar  Falls,  where  he  followed  his  profession  until  his  health  failed  him.  Twenty 
years  prior  to  his  death  he  became  an  invalid,  due  to  hard  work  and  unfaltering 
devotion  to  his  practice..  Locating  here  in  pioneer  times  when  the  county  was  but 
sparsely  settled,  he  would  go  on  long  drives  through  summer's  heat  and  winter's 
cold,  never  sparing  himself  when  he  felt  that  a  fellow  creature  needed  him.  His 
extreme  exertion  and  devotion  to  his  profession  at  length  brought  on  nervous 
dyspepsia  and  terminated  his  life. 

On  the  3d  of  January,  1847,  Dr.  Bryant  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary 
M.  Hamion,  who  was  born  in  Cheshire,  Massachusetts,  a  daughter  of  Julius 
Caesar  and  Betsy  (Barker)  Harmon,  who  always  remained  residents  of  the  east 


DR.  FEANCIS  A.  BRYANT 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  53 

until  called  to  their  final  home.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Bryant  had  but  one  child,  Vesta  A. 
The  father  died  September  4,  1910,  and  his  wife  passed  away  February  12,  191 1 
In  politics  Dr.  Bryant  was  a  stalwart  republican,  taking  an  active  interest  in 
the  work  of  the  party,  and  at  one  time  served  as  mayor  of  Cedar  Falls.  He  made 
such  a  creditable  record  in  that  position  that  he  was  three  times  elected  to  the 
office  and  in  the  exercise  of  his  official  prerogatives  he  largely  promoted  the  wel- 
fare and  upbuilding  of  the  city.  He  also  served  as  township  trustee  and  as  a 
member  of  the  school  board  in  the  early  days,  and  he  attended  the  Congregational 
church.  His  life  was  ever  upright  and  honorable  and  won  for  him  the  con- 
fidence, high  regard  and  good  will  of  all  with  whom  he  came  in  contact. 


HERMANN  MILLER. 


Hermann  Miller  is  the  secretary  and  manager  of  the  Iowa  Manufacturers 
Fire  Insurance  Company  of  Waterloo,  in  which  connection  his  efforts  have  been 
a  contributing  element  to  the  substantial  success  won  by  the  company.  A  native 
of  Germany,  he  was  born  in  1861  and  remained  a  resident  of  the  fatherland 
until  he  reached  the  age  of  nineteen  years,  when  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to 
America.  He  had  been  educated  in  his  native  country  and  was  engaged  in  mer- 
cantile pursuits  there  before  making  the  voyage  to  the  new  world,  having  served 
a  regular  apprenticeship.  On  reaching  the  United  States  in  1880  he  first  took 
up  his  abode  at  Reinbeck,  in  Grundy  county,  where  he  was  employed  as  a  clerk 
in  a  store. 

In  1881,  Mr.  Miller  arrived  in  Waterloo  and  was  associated  with  the  firm 
of  J.  G.  Hoff  &  Sons  as  a  clerk  for  four  years.  He  was  afterward  in  charge  of 
their  store  in  Reinbeck,  a  fact  which  indicates  that  he  enjoyed  the  unqualified 
confidence  and  regard  of  the  firm.  He  then  engaged  in  the  insurance  business 
and  soon  afterward  left  the  mercantile  field  and  devoted  his  time  to  the  upbuild- 
ing and  development  of  his  insurance  interests.  He  became  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Iowa  Manufacturers  Fire  Insurance  Company,  which  was  incorporated 
with  a  capital  stock  of  one  hundred  thousand  dollars,  and  their  assets  are  now 
nearly  two  hundred  thousand  dollars.  The  officers  of  the  company  are :  W.  W. 
Marsh,  president;  Hermann  Miller,  secretary  and  manager;  and  A.  H.  Holt, 
treasurer.  The  business  has  been  carefully  planned  and  systematized  and  has 
been  developed  along  the  most  modern  lines.  Each  forward  step  in  the  insurance 
field  has  brought  to  Mr.  Miller  a  wider  outlook  and  his  efforts  have  been  directed 
by  the  highest  business  ethics,  and  his  success  is  therefore  well  merited. 

In  1887,  Mr.  Miller  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Josie  Akers,  of  Iowa,  and 
they  have  become  the  parents  of  four  sons:  H.  C,  who  is  a  member  of  the 
Miller-McCartney  Insurance  Agency  at  Waterloo;  Max  F.,  a  student  of  archi- 
tectural engineering  at  the  Illinois  State  University  at  Champaign;  Milo  H.,  who 
is  studying  agricultural  engineering  at  Iowa  State  College  at  Ames;  and  Karl, 
a  student  in  the  Waterloo  schools.  The  family  are  members  of  the  Congregational 
church  and  in  its  teachings  find  the  guiding  motive  of  their  actions. 

Mr.  Miller  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  and  was  a 
candidate  for  representative  on  that  ticket.     He  is  a  member  of  the  board  of 


54  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

directors  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  also  has  membership  in  the  Waterloo 
Club,  is  an  Elk,  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  a  Mason.  He  has  never  had  occasion 
to  regret  his  determination  to  come  to  the  new  world,  for  here  he  found  the 
business  opportunities  which  he  sought  and  which  are  always  open  to  an  am- 
bitious, energetic  young  man.  Gradually  he  has  advanced  through  the  wise  use 
of  his  time  and  advantages  and  has  been  active  in  the  upbuilding  of  what  is  today 
one  of  the  important  business  enterprises  of  his  adopted  city. 


JOHN  BARO. 

John  Baro  is  now  living  retired  in  Waterloo,  occupying  a  pleasant  and  attract- 
ive home  at  No.  408  Mulberry  street.  He  was  born  in  Germany  in  1841  and  came 
to  the  United  States  in  1856,  settling  with  his  parents  on  a  farm  in  Illinois.  He 
was  a  youth  of  fifteen  when  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  and,  accordingly,  he  at  once 
became  an  active  factor  in  the  farm  work,  assisting  in  the  development  and  im- 
provement of  the  home  place  until  1869,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo.  Here  he 
embarked  in  the  brewing  business,  in  which  he  continued  for  four  or  five  years, 
and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  conducted  a  bakery  and  restaurant.  At 
two  or  three  different  periods  he  was  engaged  in  the  restaurant  btisiness  and  in 
time  became  one  of  the  prominent  and  substantial  business  men  of  the  city.  As 
the  years  went  on  his  strenuous  efiforts,  close  application  and  indefatigable  energy 
brought  to  him  a  substantial  measure  of  success  and,  with  a  handsome  competence, 
he  retired  to  private  life  to  enjoy  in  well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former 
toil,  his  property  being  more  than  sufficient  to  supply  him  with  all  of  the  comforts 
of  life. 

Mr.  Baro  was  married  in  1882  to  Miss  Anne  Friedl,  of  Waterloo,  who  has 
indeed  been  a  faithful  companion  and  helpmate  on  life's  journey.  They  are  mem- 
bers of  St.  Mary's  Catholic  church  and  contribute  generously  to  its  support.  Mr. 
Baro  was  a  member  of  the  volunteer  fire  department  of  Waterloo  for  a  number 
of  years  and  in  various  other  ways  has  been  connected  with  the  advancement  of 
the  city,  its  upbuilding  and  progress  during  the  forty-five  years  he  has  here  resided. 


GEORGE  E.  VIRDEN. 


Through  constantly  developing  powers  George  E.  Virden  has  won  for  him- 
self a  creditable  place  in  the  manufacturing  circles  of  Waterloo,  being  now  presi- 
dent and  manager  of  the  Hawkeye  Glove  &  Mitten  Company,  which  will  shortly 
be  reorganized  as  the  United  Glove  &  Mitten  Company  with  J.  I'..  Holz,  presi- 
dent; Andrew  Westberg,  vice  president;  and  George  E.  Virden,  secretary  and 
treasurer.  He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose  and  as  the  years  have  gone  by 
has  demonstrated  his  worth  in  the  business  world  and  won  success. 

Mr.  Virden  was  born  in  Mount  Pleasant,  Iowa,  December  24,  1884,  and  there 
spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth,  his  education  being  acquired  in  the 
public  schools  of  that  city.    On  leaving  school  he  embarked  in  the  grocery  busi- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  55 

ness  with  his  father,  but  in  April,  1909,  turned  from  mercantile  to  manufacturing 
interests  and  established  the  Mount  Pleasant  Glove  Manufacturing  Company. 
There  he  continued  in  business  until  May,  1913,  when  he  removed  to  Waterloo 
and  established  the  Hawkeye  Glove  &  Mitten  Company,  which  was  incorporated 
with  a  capital  stock  of  fifty  thousand  dollars.  They  have  a  well  equipped  plant, 
including  the  latest  improved  machinery  for  work  of  this  character,  and  in  the 
manufacture  of  leather  and  cotton  gloves  they  turn  out  a  large  output  which  is 
widely  shipped  and  which  returns  to  them  a  substantial  annual  income.  The 
officers  of  the  company  are:  George  E.  Virden,  president  and  manager;  J.  R. 
Hughes,  of  Mount  Pleasant,  vice  president ;  and  W.  F.  Parrott,  secretary  and 
treasurer.  Mr.  A'^irden  is  a  man  of  keen  discrimination  and  sound  judgment  and 
in  the  conduct  of  the  business  instituted  a  policy  which  measures  up  to  ttie  highest 
standards  of  commercial  honor. 

Mr.  Virden  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  belongs  to  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  also  has  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board 
of  Trade,  and  attends  the  Presbyterian  church.  The  nature  of  his  interests  and 
•activities  is  thus  indicated  and  it  is  the  logical  conclusion  that  he  is  guided  in  all 
that  he  does  by  a  spirit  of  enterprise  and  progress. 


JAMES  J.  RAINBOW. 


James  J.  Rainbow,  filling  the  position  of  county  auditor  of  Black  Hawk  county 
for  the  seventh  term,  having  been  first  elected  in  1902,  was  born  in  Lima,  New 
York,  on  the  24th  of  April,  1855,  his  parents  being  James  and  Eliza  (Goody) 
Rainbow,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England.  They  came  to  Iowa  in  1856, 
settling  at  Iowa  City,  where  they  remained  for  twelve  years  and  then  took  up 
their  abode  upon  a  farm  in  Iowa  county,  where  they  lived  for  eight  years.  On 
the  expiration  of  that  period  they  removed  to  a  farm  in  Pottawattamie  county, 
where  their  remaining  days  were  passed,  the  father's  death  occurring  in  1902, 
while  his  wife  died  in  1908.  James  Rainbow  was  just  twenty-one  years  of  age 
when  he  came  to  the  United  States  about  185 1  and  for  more  than  a  half  century 
he  continued  a  resident  of  this  country,  becoming  a  most  patriotic,  loyal  American 
citizen. 

James  J.  Rainbow  was  only  about  a  year  old  when  brought  to  this  state.  He 
attended  the  schools  of  Iowa  City  to  the  age  of  twelve  years  and  then  had  no 
further  opportunity  to  advance  his  education  until  he  reached  the  age  of  twenty- 
three  years,  when  he  became  a  student  in  the  college  at  Malvern,  Iowa,  in  which 
he  spent  several  terms.  Still  later  he  attended  the  normal  school  in  Iowa  City 
and  in  1881  he  was  graduated  from  the  commercial  college  at  Iowa  City.  In 
Pottawattamie  county  he  engaged  in  teaching  school  and  he  also  followed  that 
profession  to  some  extent  after  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  in  1889.  He  took 
up  the  occupation  of  farming  in  this  county  and  through  the  winter  months  con- 
tinued his  work  as  a  teacher.  In  1902  he  was  elected  auditor  of  Black  Hawk 
county  and  so  excellent  has  been  the  record  that  he  has  made  in  this  office  that 
he  has  been  reelected  again  and  again  until  he  is  now  serving  for  the  seventh  term 


56  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  has  never  had  opposition  in  his  own  party  save  on  one  occasion.  He  is 
prompt,  faithful  and  reliable  in  the  discharge  of  his  official  duties  and  is  justly 
accounted  one  of  the  foremost  representatives  of  the  republican  party  in  his  section 
of  the  state. 

In  March,  1889,  in  Pottawattamie  county,  Iowa,  Mr.  Rainbow  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Ida  O.  Knapp,  by  whom  he  has  a  daughter,  Frances  Willard. 
Fraternally  Mr.  Rainbow  is  connected  with  the  Royal  Arch  Masons,  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the 
Modern  Woodmen.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  his 
religious  faith  is  evidenced  by  his  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church.  His 
interests  and  activities  have  been  along  progressive  lines  and  he  has  cooperated 
in  many  movements  which  have  had  direct  bearing  upon  the  welfare,  progress 
and  prosperity  of  the  county  in  which  he  lives.  He  is  widely  known  here  as  a 
representative  citizen  and  has  many  warm  friends. 


VIRGIL  BLACKLEDGE. 

Virgil  Blackledge  is  general  agent  for  the  northeastern  part  of  the  state  of 
Iowa  for  the  Union  Central  Life  Insurance  Company  of  Cincinnati  and  in  this 
connection  his  well  formulated  plans,  carefully  executed,  are  bringing  to  him 
success  and  increasing  the  business  of  the  corporation  which  he  represents.  He, 
was  born  in  Newton,  Jasper  county,  Iowa,  on  the  i6th  of  July,  1875,  and  is  a  son 
of  Oliver  J.  and  Ernestine  (Turck)  Blackledge.  The  father  was  born  in  Indiana 
July  15,  1852,  and  was  brought  to  Iowa  by  his  parents  in  1861.  The  mother  was 
a  native  of  Jasper  county  and  her  natal  day  was  May  12,  1856.  They  were 
reared  in  Jasper  county  and  were  there  married,  and  the  mother  passed  away 
October  12,  1875.  Oliver  J.  Blackledge  early  became  familiar  with  the  best 
methods  of  tilling  the  soil  and  caring  for  the  crops  and  after  he  had  attained  his 
majority  continued  to  engage  in  farming.  Year  by  year  he  tilled  his  fields  in 
Jasper  county  until  1899,  when  he  sold  his  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  and  re- 
moved to  Oregon,  settling  in  Corvallis,  where  he  judiciously  reinvested  his  capi- 
tal and  has  won  a  substantial  measure  of  prosperity.  Since  taking  up  his  abode 
there  he  has  been  engaged  in  the  furniture  and  undertaking  business  and  is  one 
of  the  city's  well  known,  enterprising  and  successful  business  men.  He  is  the 
father  of  four  children,  those  besides  our  subject  being;  Zeller  O.,  who  died  at 
the  age  of  twenty-one;  Thaddeus  L.,  in  business  with  his  father  in  Oregon,  and 
Janet  A.,  at  home. 

Virgil  Blackledge  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  with  the  usual  ex- 
periences and  interests  that  constitute  the  life  of  the  farm  boy.  He  attended  the 
public  schools,  dividing  his  time  between  the  mastery  of  his  studies,  the  pleasures 
of  the  playground  and  the  work  of  the  fields.  As  he  neared  manhood  he  felt 
no  desire  to  change  his  occupation  and  continued  to  engage  actively  in  farming 
until  1905,  at  which  time  his  health  became  impaired,  unfitting  him  for  further 
heavy  work  on  the  farm.  He  then  prepared  himself  for  government  service  and 
went  to  Des  Moines  in  order  to  take  a  civil  service  examination.     While  await- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  57 

ing  results  he  began  selling  life  insurance  and  on  his  second  day's  work  he 
secured  his  first  policy,  although  the  transaction  was  not  closed  until  half  past 
one  in  the  morning.  This  spirit  of  indomitable  perseverance  has  been  the  chief 
factor  in  making  him  the  successful  life  insurance  man  that  he  is  today  and  has 
been  the  chief  element  in  winning  him  promotion  until  he  has  reached  the  im- 
portant and  responsible  position  of  general  agent  for  the  Union  Central  Life 
Insurance  Company  in  northeastern  Iowa.  He  has  advanced  steadily  step  by 
step,  working  his  way  upward  from  the  bottom,  and  on  the  4th  of  October,  1910, 
he  was  transferred  from  Newton  to  Waterloo  to  take  his  present  position,  in 
which  connection  he  has  given  excellent  satisfaction.  He  has  carefully  sys- 
tematized the  work  of  his  district,  keeps  in  touch  with  the  interests  of  the  agents 
under  him  and  is  constantly  broadening  his  plans  for  the  benefit  and  develop- 
ment of  the  business.  He  ranks  with  the  leading  insurance  men  of  his  part  of 
the  state. 

On  the  i8th  of  January,  1898,  Mr.  Blackledge  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Bernice  Tool,  of  Reasnor,  Iowa,  and  unto  them  was  bom  a  daughter,  Lela. 
On  the  4th  of  September,  1904,  Mr.  Blackledge  was  again  married,  his  second 
union  being  with  Miss  Myrtle  Hayes,  also  of  Reasnor.  This  union  has  been 
blessed  with  six  children,  five  daughters  and  one  son,  Ernestine,  Imogene,  June, 
Jesse  v.,  Mary  and  Leah  Maud. 

Mr.  Blackledge  holds  membership  in  Newton  Lodge,  No.  59,  A.  F.  &  A.  M., 
and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  which  he  has  sup- 
ported continuously  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise,  be- 
lieving firmly  that  the  principles  of  that  party  are  most  conducive  to  good 
government.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Blackledge  are  members  of  the  First  Methodist 
Episcopal  church  and  their  many  sterling  traits  of  character  have  gained  for 
them  the  high  regard  of  Waterloo's  best  citizens  although  they  have  been  resi- 
dents of  Black  Hawk  county  for  but  a  brief  period. 


S.  J.  HALL. 

S.  J.  Hall  is  identified  with  several  of  the  leading  business  concerns  of  Water- 
loo and  in  all  has  demonstrated  his  possession  of  qualities  which  are  indis- 
pensable in  the  attainment  of  success.  He  is  at  once  a  forceful  and  resourceful 
business  man  and  his  advancement  is  attributable  entirely  to  his  own  efforts.  He 
is  the  president  and  manager  of  the  Waterloo  Saddlery  Company,  secretary  of 
the  Waterloo  Canning  Company  and  treasurer  of  the  Cement  Machinery  Com- 
pany. His  residence  in  this  city  covers  a  period  of  thirty  years  and  his  activities 
have  been  a  factor  in  the  upbuilding  of  its  citizenship  along  the  lines  of  material 
advancement. 

Mr.  Hall  was  born  in  the  north  of  Ireland  in  1862  and  was  twenty-one  years 
of  age  when  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world.  He  made  his  way  at  once 
to  this  city,  where  he  embarked  in  the  dry-goods  business,  in  which  he  engaged 
for  about  eleven  years.  Thinking  to  broaden  the  scope  of  his  activities  and 
heighten  his  success  through  the  conduct  of  other  interests,  he,  with  others, 
organized  in  1895,  the  Waterloo  Saddlery  Company,  which  was  incorporated  with 


58  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

a  capital  stock  of  twenty-two  thousand  dollars.  This  has  been  increased  from 
time  to  time  until  the  present  capitalization  is  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand 
dollars.  The  officers  at  this  time  are:  S.  J.  Hall,  president;  L.  G.  Adams,  vice 
president;  H.  M.  Reed,  secretary;  and  L.  E.  Larsen,  treasurer.  They  manu- 
facture harness,  horse  collars  and  pads  and  their  business  has  grown  to  extensive 
and  gratifying  proportions.  They  built  their  present  quarters  on  Sycamore  street, 
where  they  have  a  building  seventy  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet  and  four 
stories  in  height  with  basement.  They  occupy  the  entire  building  and  employ 
about  sixty-five  people  in  the  plant.  Their  trade  now  extends  over  northern  and 
western  Iowa,  eastern  South  Dakota,  Nebraska  and  southern  Minnesota,  and 
their  patronage  is  growing  year  by  year.  Mr.  Hall  has  also  become  connected 
with  various  other  business  interests. 

In  1887  occurred  the  marriage  of  ^Ir.  Hall  and  Miss  Sarah  Derrick,  a  native 
of  Canada,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children :  Richard  L.,  who 
is  in  the  office  of  the  Waterloo  Saddlery-  Company;  Kathleen  A. ;  and  Dorothy  J. 
Mr.  Hall  is  a  member  of  the  Universalist  church.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Com- 
mercial Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  is  one  of  the  directors  of  that  organization. 
He  holds  membership  in  Helmet  Lodge,  K.  P.,  and  he  is  a  very  prominent  Mason. 
He  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite  and  is  the  present 
grand  commander  of  the  Knights  Templar  of  Iowa.  In  this  connection  he  is 
widely  known  throughout  the  state  and  honored  wherever  he  is  known. 

His  business  career  is  a  notable  one  and  worthy  of  emulation.  Starting  out 
in  life  without  any  vaulting  ambition  to  accomplish  something  especially  great  or 
famous,  he  has  followed  the  lead  of  his  opportunities,  doing  as  best  he  could  any- 
thing that  came  to  hand  and  seizing  legitimate  advantages  as  they  arose.  He  has 
never  hesitated  to  take  a  forward  step  when  the  way  was  open.  Though  content 
with  what  he  attained  as  he  went  along  he  has  always  been  ready  to  make  an 
advance.  Fortunate  in  possessing  the  ability  and  character  that  inspire  con- 
fidence in  others,  the  simple  weight  of  his  character  and  ability  has  carried  him 
into  important  relations  with  large  interests. 


CARL  C.  BICKLEY.  M.  D. 

Dr.  Carl  C.  Bickley  is  one  of  the  younger  representatives  of  the  medical  pro- 
fession in  Waterloo,  but  in  practice  proves  himself  the  peer  of  many  a  man  of 
older  years  and  has  gained  considerable  prominence  as  an  obstetrician.  He  was 
born  in  1882  in  the  city  where  he  still  resides  and  after  completing  the  work  of 
the  grades  continued  his  education  in  the  Waterloo  high  school  until  graduated 
with  the  class  of  1900,  when  eighteen  years  of  age.  The  succeeding  two  years 
were  spent  as  a  student  in  the  Iowa  State  Teachers'  College  at  Cedar  Falls  and 
for  four  years  he  attended  Hahnemann  Medical  College  of  Chicago,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1906,  having  completed  the  regular  course  and 
thereby  becoming  well  qualified  for  the  practice  of  medicine.  Still  he  was  not 
satisfied  and  for  nine  months  was  a  student  in  the  University  of  Edinburgh,  Scot- 
land, and  for  some  months  attended  clinics  in  Vienna,  Austria,  where  he  did 
post-graduate  work. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  59 

Thus  having  improved  every  possible  opportunity  to  increase  his  knowledge 
and  promote  his  efficiency,  Dr.  Bickley  returned  to  his  native  country  and  in 
1907  opened  an  office  in  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  engaged  in  active  practice. 
He  is  conducting  a  general  practice,  but  makes  a  specialty  of  obstetrics  and  is 
well  versed  in  that  branch  of  the  profession,  reading  broadly  and  thinking  deeply 
along  those  lines,  and  at  all  times  keeping  in  touch  with  the  advanced  work  of  the 
medical  fraternity.  He  is  attending  physician  and  surgeon  to  the  Presbyterian 
and  the  St.  Francis  hospitals  of  Waterloo  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Waterloo 
Medical  Society,  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society  and  the  Iowa  State 
Medical  Society. 

In  1906,  Dr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Daisy  Franklin,  a  native 
of  Elgin,  Illinois,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children,  Donald  and 
Iktty.  The  parents  are  well  known  in  Waterloo  and  the  record  of  Dr.  Bickley 
stands  in  contradistinction  to  the  old  adage  that  a  prophet  is  never  without  honor 
save  in  his  own  country  and  among  his  own  kin,  for  in  the  city  where  practically 
his  entire  life  has  been  passed  the  Doctor  has  worked  his  way  steadily  upward 
and  has  attained  a  position  of  distinction,  having  passed  beyond  the  ranks  of  the 
many  until  he  now  stands  among  the  successful  few. 


W.  H.  LANGLAS. 


W.  H.  Langlas,  whose  business  career  has  ever  been  characterized  by  the 
rules  which  govern  indefatigable  industry  and  strict,  unswerving  integrity,  is  now 
the  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Altstadt  &  Langlas  Baking  Company,  which, 
selling  to  a  wholesale  and  retail  trade,  is  conducting  the  largest  enterprise  of  the 
kind  in  Waterloo.  Mr.  Langlas  is  a  native  son  of  the  city  in  which  he  makes  his 
home,  his  birth  having  here  occurred  in  1879.  His  father,  Ludwig  Langlas,  was 
born  in  Germany  in  1844  and  after  spending  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth 
in  the  fatherland  bade  adieu  to  friends  and  native  country  and  sailed  for  America 
when  a  young  man.  He  arrived  in  Waterloo  about  1869  and  here  followed  the 
wagonmaker's  trade  which  he  had  previously  learned  in  Germany.  He  was 
married  in  Waterloo  to  Miss  Catherine  Reimers,  also  a  native  of  Germany,  and 
for  many  years  they  continued  residents  of  Black  Hawk  county,  Mr.  Langlas 
passing  away  in  1900  after  thirty-one  years  spent  in  Waterloo.  His  widow  sur- 
vived him  for  about  eight  years,  dying  in  1908. 

W.  H.  Langlas  is  one  of  the  four  living  children  of  his  father's  family,  the 
others  being  C.  F.,  now  a  resident  of  Newark,  New  Jersey ;  Elizabeth,  the  wife 
of  C.  F.  Altstadt;  and  J.  G.,  who  is  in  Buford,  Colorado.  The  subject  of  this 
review  is  the  third  in  order  of  birth.  He  was  reared  and  educated  in  Waterloo 
and  after  leaving  school  entered  the  dry-goods  house  of  Weishaar  &  Fassig,  with 
whom  he  remained  for  five  years,  his  fidelity  and  capability  being  manifest  in  his 
long  connection  with  that  business.  It  was  his  desire,  however,  to  engage  in  busi- 
ness on  his  own  account  that  his  efiforts  might  more  directly  benefit  himself,  and 
at  the  end  of  that  time  he  joined  C.  F.  Altstadt  in  organizing  the  present  Altstadt 
&  Langlas  Baking  Company.  From  the  beginning  the  business  has  grown  steadily 
and  its  trade  connections  now  cover  a  wide  territory,  for  the  company  sells  to 


60  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY      . 

eighty  different  towns  and  cities.  It  has  a  large  plant,  occupying  a  building  one 
hundred  and  thirty  feet  square,  which  is  splendidly  equipped  with  all  of  the 
latest  machinery  for  mixing,  cutting  and  doing  other  work  in  connection  with 
the  bakery  trade.  The  capacity  of  the  mammoth  ovens  is  twenty-five  thousand 
loaves  of  bread,  two  thousand  pies  and  fifteen  thousand  dozen  of  small  goods 
daily.  The  excellence  of  the  product  has  been  the  secret  of  the  success  of  the 
company.  Its  goods  have  constituted  a  standard  for  other  establishments  of  this 
character  and  the  name  of  Altstadt  &  Langlas  is  a  guarantee  of  quality. 

In  January,  1904,  Mr.  Langlas  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Thursnelda 
Zellhoefer,  and  they  have  one  son,  Reimers  Ludwig.  Mr.  Langlas  is  a  member 
of  Helmet  Lodge,  K.  P.,  of  the  Town  Criers  Club  and  the  Commercial  Club  and 
Board  of  Trade.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  Emanuel  Evangelical  church. 
He  is  a  self-made  man,  who,  as  the  architect  of  his  own  fortune,  has  builded 
wisely  and  well.  He  possesses  natural  ability  and  his  success  in  business  since  he 
started  in  his  present  line  has  been  uniform  and  rapid.  As  has  been  truly  remarked, 
after  all  that  may  be  done  for  a  man  in  the  way  of  giving  him  early  opportunities 
for  obtaining  the  requirements  which  are  sought  in  the  schools  and  in  books,  he 
must  essentially  formulate,  determine  and  give  shape  to  his  own  character,  and 
this  is  what  Mr.  Langlas  has  done.  He  has  persevered  in  the  pursuit  of  a  per- 
sistent purpose  and  has  gained  a  most  satisfactory  reward. 


P.  H.  PAULSEN. 


No  history  of  the  bar  of  Black  Hawk  county  would  be  complete  without  ex- 
tended reference  to  P.  H.  Paulsen,  who  came  to  Waterloo  in  191 1  and  found  in 
this  growing  and  enterprising  western  city  a  splendid  field  for  professional  activity. 
He  was  born  in  Germany  in  1872  and  there  spent  the  first  sixteen  years  of  his 
life.  On  crossing  the  Atlantic  to  America  he  located  in  Iowa,  settling  in  the 
vicinity  of  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  engaged  in  farming.  About  three  years  after 
arriving  here,  when  but  eighteen  years  of  age,  he  managed  an  eleven  hundred 
acre  farm  in  Grundy  county,  where  he  remained  for  several  years.  He  was  very 
successful  as  a  farmer,  but  while  he  found  that  work  congenial,  he  had  a  desire 
for  a  more  advanced  education,  so  he  entered  Cornell  College,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1900,  winning  the  Ph.  B.  degree.  He 
then  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching  and  was  superintendent  of  schools  at 
Oxford  Junction  for  three  years.  During  that  period  and  for  some  time  prior 
thereto  he  devoted  his  vacations  and  the  hours  which  are  usually  termed  leisure 
to  the  study  of  law  and  successfully  passed  the  required  examination  which  won 
him  admission  to  the  Iowa  bar  in  1903.  He  then  located  at  Estherville,  where 
he  practiced  until  191 1,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  followed 
his  profession. 

When  he  left  Estherville  the  leading  paper  of  the  town  spoke  of  him  as 
follows :  "Attorney  P.  H.  Paulsen  and  his  excellent  family  expect  to  leave  in  a 
few  days  for  their  new  home  in  Waterloo.  They  have  hosts  of  friends  here  who 
wish  them  well  in  their  new  home.  Attorney  Paulsen  has  been  in  the  practice  of 
law  here  for  eight  years  and  in  that  time  has  built  up  a  wonderful  practice.     His 


p.  H.  PAULSEN 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  63 

practice  has  been  principally  in  Emmet,  Dickinson,  Clay,  Kossuth,  Hamilton  and 
Hardin  counties.  His  success  in  the  trial  of  his  cases  has  been  exceptional.  We 
doubt  if  there  is  an  attorney  in  northwestern  Iowa  who  has  had  a  more  phenomenal 
success.  In  a  material  way  his  success  stands  almost  alone.  He  still  holds  con- 
siderable land  in  the  county,  and  leaves  with  friends  galore.  There  is  general 
regret  among  the  people  here  to  see  him  go,  as  he  has  been  especially  active  in 
everything  for  the  good  of  Estherville.  No  one  could  leave  Estherville  whose 
departure  would  be  attended  with  more  general  regret.  He  will  be  greatly  missed 
in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias  lodge,  as  in  both 
of  these  organizations  he  was  very  active.  Mr.  Paulsen  has  invested  heavily  in 
Waterloo,  and  it  goes  without  question  that  he  will  become  prominently  identified 
with  the  future  growth  and  business  of  Waterloo  and  will  take  a  leading  place  in 
the  practice  of  law  at  that  place.  In  moving  from  this  place  Estherville  loses  a 
good  substantial  citizen,  and  Waterloo  gains  a  resident  of  whom  she  will  be 
proud." 

The  prediction  concerning  Waterloo  has  been  fully  realized,  for  the  city  recog- 
nizes his  value  along  many  lines.  He  is  indeed  an  able  member  of  the  bar  and 
since  the  beginning  of  his  residence  here  he  has  been  unusually  prosperous  in 
every  respect.  He  possesses  in  an  eminent  degree  the  qualities  which  work  for 
advancement  in  the  legal  profession  and  he  is  faithful  to  ever}^  interest  com- 
mitted to  his  charge.  Aside  from  his  law  practice  he  is  largely  interested  in  real 
estate  and  he  is  a  stockholder  in  several  business  corporations  and  companies  of 
Waterloo,  where  his  sound  judgment  and  cooperation  are  considered  of  great 
worth. 

In  1902,  Mr.  Paulsen  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mabel  Haven,  of 
Charles  City.  Iowa,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  three  children :  Mary 
Esther.  Ruth  and  Haven.  Mr.  Paulsen  holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of 
Pythias,  has  passed  through  all  of  the  chairs  in  the  lodge  and  has  been  repre- 
sentative to  the  grand  lodge.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Grace  Metho- 
dist Episcopal  church  and  he  is  serving  on  its  board  of  trustees,  taking  a  most 
active  and  helpful  part  in  its  work  and  doing  all  in  his  power  to  extend  its  in- 
fluence. He  lives  in  a  beautiful  home  which  he  erected  on  Prospect  Hill  and  is 
most  happy  in  the  companionship  of  an  interesting  family.  Whatsoever  his 
hand  finds  to  do,  whether  in  his  profession,  in  church  connections  or  in  any  other 
sphere,  he  does  with  his  might  and  with  a  deep  sense  of  conscientious  obligation. 


JAMES  E.  SEDGWICK. 

Honored  and  respected  by  all,  there  is  no  man  who  occupies  a  more  enviable 
position  in  financial  and  business  circles  than  does  James  E.  Sedgwick,  now  presi- 
dent of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank.  His  course  has  ever  been  one 
which  would  bear  the  closest  investigation  and  scrutiny  and  at  all  times  he  has  been 
actuated  by  a  spirit  of  progress  and  advancement  that  has  wrought  excellent 
results  for  the  institution  with  which  he  is  connected  and  for  the  community  at 
large.    He  was  born  at  Moline,  Illinois,  June  4,  1854,  a  son  of  Theodore  H.  and 

Laura  S.  (Parsons)  Sedgwick,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  state  of  New 
Vol.  11—4 


64  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

York  and  in  1840  removed  westward  to  Illinois.  At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war 
the  father  became  a  private  of  the  Ninety-fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  serv- 
ing for  one  year.  He  was  engaged  in  the  abstract  business  at  Clinton,  Iowa,  at 
the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1902. 

James  E.  Sedgwick  was  a  student  in  Grand  Prairie  Seminary  at  Oneida,  Illi- 
nois, when  his^  text-books  were  put  aside  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years.  Later,  how- 
ever, he  determined  to  prepare  for  the  bar  and  studied  law  in  Paxton,  Illinois, 
being  admitted  to  practice  in  1881.  The  same  year  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  at 
once  entered  upon  the  abstract  business,  in  which  he  has  since  been  successfully 
engaged,  the  firm  being  now  incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  Sedgwick-Lichty 
Abstract  Company.  From  the  beginning  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo  he  has  been 
recognized  as  an  enterprising  business  man,  diligent  and  determined,  making  wise 
use  of  his  time,  talents  and  opportunities.  In  1906  he  was  elected  to  the  presi- 
dency of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank  and  he  is  also  president  of  the 
Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company.  The  high  position  which  he  occupies  is  not 
merely  the  result  of  his  success  but  of  his  straightforward  business  methods  and 
the  honorable  policy  which  he  has  ever  pursued  in  all  of  his  business  dealings. 

On  the  loth  of  November,  1886,  at  Waterloo,  Iowa,  Mr.  Sedgwick  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Carrie  A.  Cobb,  by  whom  he  has  the  following  children : 
Helen  A.,  Catharine  J.,  Mary  L.,  Theodore  E.  and  Harriett  E.  Mr.  Sedgwick 
gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and  has  been  active  in  its 
ranks.  For  fifteen  years  he  served  as  alderman  of  Waterloo,  exercising  his  official 
prerogatives  in  support  of  many  progressive  public  measures  which  have  had  to 
do  with  the  upbuilding  and  welfare  of  the  city.  He  studies  the  needs  and  condi- 
tions of  this  growing  metropoHs  of  Iowa  and  has  done  everything  in  his  power  to 
make  the  city  what  it  is  today — one  of  the  most  beautiful  and  progressive  cities  of 
the  middle  west.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  the  Knight  Templar  degree  and 
has  also  crossed  the  sands  of  the  desert  with  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Benevolent  Protective 
Order  of  Elks  and  he  and  his  family  attend  the  Congregational  church.  He  be- 
longs to  that  class  of  men  to  whom  success  has  come  as  the  legitimate  and  direct 
result  of  energy  intelligently  directed.  He  has  made  each  act  count  for  the  utmost 
and  each  step  in  his  career  has  been  a  forward  one,  bringing  him  a  broader  out- 
look and  wider  opportunities. 


PERRY  E.  CANFIELD. 


Perry  E.  Canfield  is  the  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Canfield  Lumber  Com- 
pany, which  was  established  in  Waterloo  in  1904  and  has  since  been  one  of  the 
growing  business  enterprises  of  the  city.  As  an  officer  Perry  E.  Canfield  has 
contributed  largely  to  its  success  and  his  business  record  is  such  a  one  that 
Black  Hawk  county  is  proud  to  number  him  among  her  native  sons.  He  was 
born  on  a  farm  in  Lester  township  in  1871,  a  son  of  Samuel  Canfield,  now 
deceased,  who  came  from  his  old  home  in  the  vicinity  of  Syracuse,  New  York, 
to  Iowa  about  1855  and  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  early  settlers  of  Black  Hawk 
county.     He  established  his  home  upon  a   farm  in  Lester  township  and  there 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  65 

continued  to  reside  for  a  considerable  period,  but  afterward  turned  his  attention 
to  general  merchandising  in  New  Hartford,  Butler  county.  His  last  days  were 
spent  in  the  home  of  his  son  Perry  E.  Canfield  in  Waterloo.  His  wife  bore 
the  maiden  name  of  Harriett  Wood  and  was  a  daughter  of  Enos  Wood,  one  of 
the  pioneer  residents  of  this  county. 

Perry  E.  Canfield  was  largely  reared  and  educated  in  Black  Hawk  county 
and  remained  upon  the  home  farm  until  twenty-eight  years  of  age,  gaining  broad 
practical  experience  in  the  best  methods  of  tilling  the  soil  and  caring  for  the  " 
crops.  He  continued  in  agricultural  life  for  several  years  after  attaining  his 
majority  and  then,  thinking  to  find  commercial  pursuits  more  congenial,  he  went 
to  Benson,  where  he  opened  a  lumberyard,  which  he  conducted  for  a  year.  On 
the  expiration  of  that  time  He  sold  out,  but  again  started  in  the  lumber  business  at 
Dunkerton  in  1902.  After  withdrawing  from  the  lumber  trade  at  Benson  he 
again  had  charge  of  the  farm,  devoting  three  years  to  agricultural  pursuits,  giving 
much  of  his  time  to  stock-raising  and  fattening  stock  for  the  market.  He  made 
large  shipments  and  carefully  and  successfully  directed  his  interests.  In  1904  he 
came  to  Waterloo  and  organized  the  Canfield  Lumber  Company,  which  was 
incorporated  with  a  capital  stock  of  thirty  thousand  dollars  with  Lee  Canfield,  of 
Cedar  Rapids,  as  president ;  C.  J.  Schneck,  of  Waterloo,  as  vice  president,  and 
Perry  E.  Canfield  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  lumber  business  at  Dunker- 
ton, however,  was  continued  until  the  spring  of  1914.  The  company  also  operated 
a  yard  at  Winslow  for  about  four  years  and  later  a  kimberyard  at  Janesville, 
which  was  sold  in  August,  1914.  At  Waterloo  business  is  conducted  along 
both  wholesale  and  retail  lines.  Their  plant  is  the  largest  of  the  kind  in  the  city, 
covering  about  ten  acres  of  land  on  Falls  avenue.  Their  lumber  trade  has  now 
reached  extensive  proportions  and  they  enjoy  a  gratifying  patronage  both  whole- 
sale and  retail.  The  members  of  the  firm  are  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the 
lumber  trade  in  every  particular,  know  how  to  purchase  to  good  advantage  and, 
selling  at  reasonable  prices,  have  built  up  a  business  of  large  and  gratifying 
proportions. 

The  brothers  who  are  partners  in  the  .firm  also  operate  the  old  homestead  that 
their  grandfather,  Enos  Wood,  took  up  from  the  government  about  1855.  In 
addition  to  their  lumber  interests  at  Waterloo  they  also  have  a  yard  at  Cedar 
Rapids,  their  business  there  being  incorporated  and  capitalized  for  thirty  thousand 
dollars  under  the  style  of  the  Lee  Canfield  Lumber  Company,  of  which  P.  E. 
Canfield  is  the  president  with  Lee  Canfield  as  secretary,  treasurer  and  local 
manager.  They  also  own  a  lumberyard  at  Kenwood  Park,  condticted  under  the 
name  of  the  Kenwood  Lumber  Company,  which  was  incorporated  for  twenty 
thousand  dollars.  They  are  proprietors  of  another  lumberyard  at  Iowa  Falls, 
conducted  under  the  style  of  Canfield  &  Company,  with  John  A.  Stewart  as  the 
local  manager.  Their  lumber  trade  is  thus  extensive,  covering  a  considerable 
area,  and  their  enterprise  is  among  the  foremost  of  this  character  in  western 
Iowa.  Still  further  extending  the  scope  of  their  activities,  they  have  recently 
established  an  oil  plant  at  Kenwood  Park,  where  they  have  five  large  storage 
tanks,  and  William  Armstrong  is  in  charge  of  their  business  at  that  point.  They 
were  also  instrumental  in  securing  the  establishment  of  the  Kenwood  Savings 
Bank  and  own  a  large  share  of  its  stock,  while  Lee  Canfield  is  serving  on  the 
board  of  directors. 


66  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Both  brothers  are  married.  Lee  Canfield  wedded  Miss  Annie  Paulger,  who 
died  leaving  a  daughter,  Dorothy,  and  following  her  demise  he  wedded  Miss 
Alice  Ripka,  by  whom  he  has  a  daughter,  Marvel. 

In  1907  Perry  E.  Canfield  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  Stewart.  He 
belongs  to  Helmet  Lodge.  K.  P.,  of  Waterloo,  is  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  the  Waterloo  Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club.  Lee  Canfield  is  a 
Mason  and  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  Cedar  Rapids.  The  brothers 
are  indeed  prominent  and  active  factors  in  the  business  development  of  western 
Iowa.  Their  efiforts  have  been  of  far-reaching  importance  to  the  community  as 
well  as  a  source  of  individual  profit.  As  the  years  have  gone  on  they  have  won 
a  most  creditable  place  in  commercial  circles  and  may  be  numbered  with  the  real 
upbuilders  of  the  state,  for  the  welfare  of  a  community  does  not  depend  so  much 
upon  the  machinery  of  government  as  upon  the  men  who  are  controlling  its  busi- 
ness development.  Waterloo  has  reason  to  be  congratulated  upon  having  in  its 
midst  such  an  enterprising,  progressive  and  well  balanced  business  man  and  citizen 
as  Perry  E.  Canfield. 


DeWITT  CLINTON  HUNTOON.  M.  D. 

In  the  years  of  his  connection  with  the  medical  profession  of  Waterloo, 
Dr.  DeWitt  Clinton  Huntoon  has  built  up  an  extensive  and  important  practice, 
his  ability  and  conscientious  service  being  widely  recognized  by  those  in  need 
of  medical  attention.  Michigan  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  Waterford  on  the  29th  of  October,  1873.  his  parents  being  Phineas 
and  Susan  (Bentley)  Huntoon,  the  former  a  native  of  New  York  and  the  latter 
of  Rhode  Island.  They  lived  for  many  years  in  the  middle  west,  the  father  pass- 
ing away  in  1903.  having  for  five  years  survived  his  wife,  who  died  in  1898. 
Dr.  LIuntoon  has  one  brother.  Milton  B.,  who  is  state  telephone  engineer  of 
Michigan,  and  a  sister,  Alida  E.,  the  wife  of  the  Hon.  Samuel  W.  Smith,  con- 
gressman from  the  sixth  district  of  Michigan. 

Dr.  Huntoon  attended  the  Waterford  and  Pontiac  (Mich.)  public  schools 
and  afterward  entered  the  Michigan  State  University  at  Ann  Arbor,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1897  with  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree. 
Determining  upon  the  practice  of  medicine  as  a  life  work,  he  then  entered  the 
Rush  Medical  College  of  Chicago,  in  which  he  completed  his  course  by  graduation 
in  1903.  He  at  once  located  for  practice  in  that  city  but  in  1905  removed  to  Water- 
loo, where  he  has  since  remained  and  in  the  intervening  period  of  about  ten  years 
has  built  up  a  large  and  gratifying  practice.  He  kee])s  thoroughly  informed 
concerning  the  latest  investigation  and  researches  of  the  profession  and  is  in 
close  touch  with  modern  methods  of  treating  disease.  Moreover,  he  is  both 
zealous  and  conscientious  in  the  discharge  of  his  professional  duties  and  his 
worth  in  his  chosen  field  is  widely  recognized. 

On  the  4th  of  May,  1908.  at  ^lankato,  Minnesota.  Dr.  Huntoon  was  joined 
in  wedlock  to  Miss  Marlys  Kessey.  by  whom  he  has  a  son,  Robert  DeWitt. 
Dr.  Huntoon  has  held  but  one  public  office,  that  of  police  commissioner,  in  which 
he  served  for  six  years.     His  political  indorsement  is  always  given  to  the  repub- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  67 

lican  party.  He  has  membership  with  the  Elks,  with  the  Commercial  Club  and 
with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  he  and  his  family  attend  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  the  Black 
Hawk  County  Medical  Society  and  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Society.  He  is 
actuated  in  his  professional  career  by  a  laudable  ambition  that  has  prompted  wide 
reading  and  study  and  his  success  is  well  deserved. 


WIRT  P.  HOXIE. 


Wirt  P.  Hoxie,  county  attorney  of  Black  Hawk  county  and  an  active  and 
prominent  member  of  the  bar  of  Waterloo,  was  born  in  Barclay  township  on  the 
27th  of  September,  1871,  and  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  old  pioneer  families 
of  this  part  of  the  state.  His  father,  Hiram  B,  Hoxie,  was  a  native  of  New  York 
and,  removing  to  the  west  in  1868,  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  earliest  settlers  of 
Black  Hawk  county.  For  seventeen  years  he  lived  upon  a  farm  in  Barclay  town- 
ship, during  which  period  he  brought  his  fields  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  In 
1888  he  was  elected  county  sheriff  and  made  such  an  excellent  record  in  office  that 
he  was  reelected  and  again  elected  until  he  had  filled  the  position  for  four  terms 
of  two  years  each  and  retired  on  the  expiration  of  his  eighth  year  with  the  confi- 
dence and  regard  of  all  law-abiding  citizens.  Following  that  period  he  became 
connected  with  the  Waterloo  Saddlery  Company  and  was  thus  active  in  business 
until  about  1900,  when  he  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Waterloo  Fruit  & 
Commission  Company,  wholesale  dealers  in  fruit.  Of  this  company  he  is  the 
treasurer  and  he  has  contributed  much  to  its  growing  success.  His  long  residence 
in  the  county  ranks  him  among  the  pioneer  settlers,  while  his  business  ability  and 
enterprise  and  his  public  service  have  won  him  place  among  the  leading  citizens. 

Wirt  P.  Hoxie  attended  the  public  schools  until  graduated  from  the  Waterloo 
high  school  with  the  class  of  1890.  He  afterward  devoted  a  year  to  a  collegiate 
course  in  the  University  of  Iowa  and  then  entered  upon  the  study  of  law,  com- 
pleting his  course  in  the  law  department  of  that  institution  with  the  class  of  1897. 
He  then  located  in  Waterloo  for  the  practice  of  his  profession  and  for  a  number 
of  years  was  associated  with  W.  H.  Brunn  under  the  style  of  Hoxie  &  Brunn. 
In  1908  he  was  elected  county  attorney,  was  reelected  in  1910  and  in  1912  was 
again  chosen  to  that  position,  so  that  he  is  now  serving  for  the  sixth  year,  having 
made  a  splendid  record  in  office.  He  is  also  accorded  a  large  clientage  as  a  private 
practitioner  of  law  and  it  is  well  known  that  he  prepares  his  cases  with  great  care 
and  precision  and  is  ever  ready  to  meet  not  only  the  expected  but  also  the  unex- 
pected, which  happens  quite  as  frequently  in  the  courts  as  out  of  them.  While  his 
devotion  to  his  clients'  interests  is  proverbial,  he  never  forgets  that  he  owes  a 
still  higher  allegiance  to  the  majesty  of  the  law. 

In  1907  Mr.  Hoxie  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ruth  Ling,  who  was  a 
teacher  in  the  schools  of  Waterloo.  Theirs  is  a  hospitable  home  whose  good  cheer 
is  enjoyed  by  many.  They  hold  membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church, 
and  Mr.  Hoxie  belongs  also  to  the  Masonic,  Elks  and  Knights  of  Pythias  lodges, 
to  the  teachings  and  fraternal  spirit  of  which  he  is  ever  loyal.  He  is  also  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Commercial  Club  and  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  takes  an  active  and 


68  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

helpful  part  in  furthering  the  material  development  of  the  county  in  which  his 
entire  life  has  been  passed.  He  is  indeed  one  of  its  well  known  residents  and  one 
of  its  most  highly  esteemed  citizens. 


GEORGE  B.  MILLER. 


George  B.  Miller  is  the  president  of  the  Waterloo  Gasoline  Engine  Company 
and  as  such  is  closely  connected  with  one  of  the  important  productive  industries 
of  the  city.  He  was  born  in  Waterloo  in  1872,  a  son  of  George  W.  Miller,  a 
native  of  Pennsylvania,  who  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  when  there  were  only 
three  or  four  houses  in  the  county  seat.  He  walked  the  entire  distance  from 
Dubuque  to  this  county  and  after  reaching  his  destination  followed  the  profession 
of  civil  engineering,  laying  out  and  surveying  nearly  all  of  Waterloo  and  the 
adjacent  territory.  He  became  closely  associated  with  the  pioneer  development 
of  this  section  of  the  state  and  was  a  most  prominent,  valued  and  influential 
citizen.  After  following  civil  engineering  for  a  time  he  turned  his  attention  to 
manufacturing  interests  and  later  engaged  extensively  in  real-estate  dealing, 
owning  a  large  amount  of  property  in  Waterloo  and  its  vicinity.  His  judgment 
was  sound  and  his  investments  therefore  judiciously  made,  so  that  he  derived  a 
substantial  income  from  his  activity  in  the  real-estate  field.  His  death  occurred 
about  the  year  1897  and  in  his  passing  Black  Hawk  county  lost  a  representative 
citizen. 

George  B.  Miller  was  educated  in  the  Waterloo  high  school  and  in  the  State 
University  of  Iowa,  completing  the  course  in  the  law  department  of  that  insti- 
tution with  the  class  of  1894.  He  then  practiced  law  for  five  years,  after  which 
he  turned  his  attention  to  the  manufacture  of  gasoline  engines,  in  which  he  was 
associated  with  his  brother  and  others,  his  brother  managing  the  business.  In 
1899  George  B.  Miller  purchased  his  brother's  and  the  others'  interests  in  the 
factory  and  he  has  been  in  active  management  as  president  of  the  company  for 
the  past  ten  years.  This  is  one  of  the  most  extensive  and  most  important  indus- 
tries of  the  city.  The  main  building  is  one  thousand  by  one  hundred  and  twenty 
feet,  there  are  two  other  buildings  fifty  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet  each, 
and  the  foundry  is  one  hundred  and  sixty  by  six  hundred  feet.  The  concern 
employs  on  an  average  seven  hundred  workmen  and  the  output  is  extensive.  The 
company  manufactures  gas  engines,  traction  engines,  spreaders,  cream  separators 
and  a  number  of  smaller  articles.  The  plant  is  splendidly  equipped  with  all  the 
latest  improved  machinery  and  the  business  is  most  carefully  systematized,  so 
that  maximum  results  are  achieved  at  a  minimum  expenditure  of  time,  labor  and 
material — which  is  the  source  of  all  business  success.  Mr.  Miller  as  president  of 
the  company  is  bending  his  efforts  to  administrative  direction  and  executive  con- 
trol and  his  capability  in  correctly  solving  intricate  business  problems  is  manifest 
in  his  efficient  management  which  is  bringing  to  the  company  a  most  gratifying 
and  substantial  measure  of  prosperity.  He  is  also  interested  in  other  business 
enterprises  of  importance  in  Waterloo  and  is  the  secretary  of  the  Leavitt-Johnson- 
Miller  Building  Company. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  69 

In  1897  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  George  B.  Miller  and  Miss  Myrtle  L. 
Caldweld,  a  daughter  of  J.  D.  Caldweld.  They  now  have  one  son,  De  Forrest, 
who  is  a  high-school  student  in  Waterloo.  The  parents  are  members  of  the 
First  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Miller  is  serving  as  president  of  the 
board  of  trustees.  He  is  a  generous  contributor  to  the  support  of  the  church 
and  an  active  factor  in  various  departments  of  its  work.  He  also  belongs  to  the 
Masonic  fraternity,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  Knight  Templar  degree,  and  in 
his  life  he  exemplifies  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft.  He  likewise  has  mem- 
bership with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Elks,  and  the  nature  of  his  interests 
is  further  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce, the  Commercial  Club  and  the  Waterloo  Club.  His  activity  in  business 
has  not  only  contributed  to  his  individual  success  but  has  also  been  a  factor  in 
the  development  of  the  city  and  he  is  now  accounted  one  of  the  foremost  resi- 
dents of  Waterloo,  controlling  one  of  its  most  extensive  and  most  important 
business  enterprises. 


JAMES  BLACK. 


James  Black  occupies  a  prominent  position  on  the  stage  of  business  activity 
in  Waterloo  and  at  all  times  has  played  well  his  part.  He  is  president  of  the 
James  Black  Dry  Goods  Company,  which  controls  most  extensive  and  important 
commercial  interests,  contributing  to  the  welfare  and  prosperity  of  the  community 
as  well  as  to  individual  success  inasmuch  as  it  affords  employment  to  a  large  force 
of  salespeople.  Mr.  Black  is  a  native  of  County  Donegal,  Ireland,  bom  in  1857, 
and  is  a  son  of  William  Alexander  and  Ann  (Maltman)  Black,  also  natives  of 
Donegal,  where  they  spent  their  entire  lives. 

In  the  schools  of  his  native  county  James  Black  pursued  his  education.  He 
was  thirty-five  years  of  age  when  in  1892  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  established  a 
retail  dry-goods  store  on  East  Fourth  street  with  a  capital  of  forty-five  hundred 
dollars.  He  employed  two  clerks  at  that  time  and  something  of  the  growth  of 
his  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  now  gives  employment  to  over  three 
hundred  people.  In  1914  he  erected  and  occupied  a  new  building  one  hundred 
by  one  hundred  and  forty  feet,  eight  stories  in  height  with  basement,  and  he  now 
conducts  a  business  amounting  to  one  million  dollars  annually.  This  is  incor- 
porated under  the  name  of  the  James  Black  Dry  Goods  Company,  of  which  he  is 
the  president. 

A  contemporary  biographer,  writing  of  his  commercial  career,  said :  "He  has 
an  almost  unlimited  capacity  for  work  and  a  complete  conception  of  the  demands 
of  the  pubUc.  His  establishment  is  as  fully  equipped  with  modern  comforts  and 
conveniences  as  any  city  emporium,  while  his  very  large  and  carefully  selected 
stock  is  adapted  to  the  demands  of  the  most  critical.  Mr.  Black  has  introduced 
many  original  ideas  into  his  business,  calculated  to  attract  attention  and  secure 
confidence,  but  all  in  a  legitimate  way,  for  he  is  not  only  a  big  man  physically, 
but  he  is  big  morally  also,  and  it  is  his  chief  pride  that  his  business  has  been  built 
upon  a  foundation  of  commercial  honesty.  He  is  awake  to  all  the  possibilities  of 
trade,  understands  when  to  buy  and  when  to  sell,  as  becomes  a  first-class  business' 


70  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

man,  and  is  at  all  times  ready  to  meet  competition.  A  marked  feature  of  this 
establishment  is  the  courtesy  shown  to  purchasers  from  its  genial  head  down  to 
the  humblest  member  of  the  force,  and  that  this  is  appreciated  is  shown  by  the 
large  returns  from  the  business."  Aside  from  his  commercial  interests  Mr.  Black 
is  a  director  and  the  second  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waterloo 
and  a  director  of  the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Company. 

On  the  15th  of  September,  1892,  in  Marshalltown,  Iowa,  Mr.  Black  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Anna  M.  Harper,  by  whom  he  has  three  children,  namely: 
Anna  J.,  Elizabeth  M.  and  Margaret.  The  parents  hold  membership  in  the  Pres- 
byterian church  and  are  generous  contributors  to  its  support.  Mr.  Black  votes 
wath  the  republican  party  and  is  thoroughly  conversant  with  the  leading  questions 
and  issues  of  the  day  but  has  had  neither  time  nor  inclination  for  public  office. 
He  holds  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  the  Board  of  Trade  and,  while 
an  extremely  busy  man,  developing  commercial  interests  of  great  importance,  he 
always  finds  time  to  cooperate  in  plans  and  measures  for  the  public  good.  He  is 
notably  prompt,  energetic  and  reliable  and  seems  to  have  a  genius  for  devising 
the  right  thing  at  the  right  time,  joined  to  everyday  common  sense  and  resistless 
will  power.  Those  who  meet  him  in  either  business  or  social  relations  find  him 
genial  and  cordial.  He  holds  friendship  inviolable  and  in  his  life  has  proven  the 
truth  of  the  Emersonian  philosophy  that  "the  way  to  win  a  friend  is  to  be  one." 


AUSTIN  BURT. 


Austin  Burt,  manager  of  the  Citizens  Gas  &  Electric  Company  of  Waterloo,  is 
a  practical  business  man  of  sound  judgment,  forceful  and  resourceful.  He  was 
born  in  Detroit,  Michigan,  June  20,  1870,  and  is  a  son  of  Horace  E.  and  Lillie 
( Higgins)  Burt,  who  were  natives  of  Michigan  and  of  Massachusetts  respectively. 
The  family  has  been  represented  on  American  soil  from  almost  the  earliest  period 
of  settlement  in  this  country,  the  emigrant  ancestor  being  Richard  Burt,  who 
came  from  England  in  1638.  His  great-great-grandson,  Alvin  Burt,  was  a  soldier 
of  the  Revolutionary  w^ar,  enlisting  from  Massachusetts,  and  he  was  the  great- 
great-grandfather  of  x\ustin  Burt,  of  this  review.  In  1902  the  parents  of  our 
subject  came  to  Waterloo,  where  the  father  still  makes  his  home,  but  the  mother 
passed  away  in  1909. 

Reared  in  his  native  city,  Austin  Burt  attended  the  public  schools  of  Detroit 
and  later  was  a  student  in  the  public  schools  of  Black  River  Falls,  Wisconsin, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1890.  He  pursued  his  college 
course  at  Cornell  University  of  Ithaca,  New  York,  where  he  completed  a  Mechani- 
cal Engineering  course,  specializing  electricity,  and  was  graduated  with  the 
class  of  1900.  He  then  removed  to  Cedar  Falls  and  secured  a  position  in  con- 
nection with  the  Electric  Light  Company,  of  which  he  was  made  manager  in  the 
month  of  December.  He  remained  in  that  position  for  a  year  and  a  half  and  then 
came  to  his  present  connection  with  the  Citizens  Gas  &  Electric  Company  of 
Waterloo  as  superintendent,  later  becoming  manager.  He  is  thoroughly  equipped 
by  scientific  training  and  practical  experience  for  the  duties  which  devolve  upon 
him  and  his  record  is  a  thoroughly  creditable  one,  for  he  has  steadily  advanced 


AUSTIN  BUET 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  73 

in  his  chosen  field  and  is  today  a  foremost  figure  among  the  electrical  engineers 
of  the  state. 

On  the  1 8th  of  January,  1898,  Mr.  Burt  was  married  at  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  to 
Miss  Mary  Ellen  Bartlett,  a  daughter  of  Professor  Moses  W.  Bartlett,  now  de- 
ceased, formerly  of  the  Iowa  Teachers'  College  of  Cedar  Falls.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Burt  have  two  children:  Dorothy  Irene,  born  in  1902;  and  Richard  Bartlett, 
whose  birth  occurred  in  1906. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burt  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church  and  are  in- 
terested in  the  various  plans  and  measures  put  forth  for  the  benefit  of  the  com- 
munity along  material  and  social  as  well  as  moral  lines.  For  seven  years  Mr. 
Burt  served  on  the  library  board  and  for  five  years  has  been  a  member  of  the 
school  board,  acting  in  both  positions  at  the  present  time.  His  political  views 
are  in  accord  with  the  principles  of  the  republican  party,  while  fraternally  he  is 
well  known,  being  vice  chancellor  of  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  109,  K.  P.,  a  Master 
Mason  and  one  of  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  Formerly  he  was  identified  with 
the  Elks,  but  is  now  demitted.  He  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  and  is  presi- 
dent of  the  Bunker  Hill  Chapter  of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution  at 
Waterloo.  He  is  guided  by  a  spirit  of  patriotism  in  all  of  his  public  connections. 
He  has  many  sterling  traits  of  character,  but  none  more  admirable  than  his  de- 
votion to  duty,  which  is  manifest  in  his  business  life,  in  his  church  relations  and 
in  every  field  into  which  he  has  directed  his  activities.  He  is  now  serving  as  one 
of  the  trustees  of  the  First  Congregational  church  and  he  is  a  member  of  the 
Iowa  Historical  Society.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  college  fraternity,  Phi 
Gamma  Delta,  and  the  college  honor  society,  Sigma  Xi. 

High  honors  have  come  to  him  along  the  path  of  his  profession.  In  1905  he 
was  president  of  the  Iowa  Electrical  Association  and  in  1907  was  president  of  the 
Iowa  District  Gas  Association.  From  191 2  until  1914  he  has  been  a  director  of 
the  American  Gas  Institute  of  New  York,  which  is  a  national  association.  He  is 
likewise  a  member  of  the  American  Institute  of  Electrical  Engineers  and  the 
American  Society  of  Mechanical  Engineers.  Progress  and  patriotism  might  well 
be  termed  the  keynote  of  his  character.  He  neglects  none  of  life's  duties,  is 
patient  and  persevering  in  their  performance,  and  in  all  that  he  does  is  guided  by 
high  ideals. 


GEORGE  W.  DAWSON. 

Georee  W.  Dawson,  member  of  the  bar  of  Waterloo,  was  born  in  Butler 
county,  Iowa,  in  1864,  a  son  of  Edward  Dawson,  deceased,  who  was  a  native  of 
England  and  in  the  year  1856  came  to  this  state,  settling  in  Butler  county,  where 
he  engaged  in  farming  and  stock-raising  throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life. 
He  brought  his  land  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  carefully  managed  his 
business  affairs.     He  married  Catherine  Fearns,  a  native  of  Ireland. 

Their  son,  George  W.  Dawson,  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  county  and  afterward  attended  the  University  of  Iowa  and 
also  taught  school.  He  imparted  readily  and  clearly  to  others  the  knowledge 
which  he  had  acquired,  but  he  regarded  this  merely  as  an  initial  step  to  other 


74  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

professional  labor  and  afterward  took  up  the  study  of  law,  being  graduated  from 
the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Iowa  with  the  class  of  1887.  He  then 
located  in  Waterloo,  opened  an  office  and  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  pro- 
fession. With  the  exception  of  one  year,  which  he  spent  as  a  partner  of  Judge 
M.  F.  Edwards,  he  has  always  been  alone  in  practice  and  his  success  is  therefore 
the  direct  result  of  his  merit  and  ability.  He  practices  in  all  the  courts  of  the 
state  and  in  the  federal  court  and  is  a  well  known  member  of  the  county  and  of 
the  state  bar  associations.  He  has  marked  strength  of  character  combined  with 
a  thorough  grasp  of  the  law,  and  he  has  in  large  degree  the  rare  ability  of  saying 
in  a  convincing  way  the  right  thing  at  the  right  time.  His  practice  is  now  quite 
extensive  and  of  an  important  character.  Aside  from  his  professional  interests, 
Mr.  Dawson  is  a  stockholder  in  various  business  enterprises  and  projects  which 
return  to  him  a  gratifying  annual  income. 

In  1890  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  George  W.  Dawson  and  Miss  Ellen 
Swan,  a  daughter  of  Z.  M.  Swan,  of  Butler  county,  and  they  have  become  parents 
of  two  sons.  Dale,  now  deceased,  and  Donald.  Mr.  Dawson  holds  membership 
in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  was  secretary  for  a 
number  of  years,  and  as  a  public-spirited  citizen  he  cooperates  in  many  plans 
and  measures  for  the  general  good,  contributing  largely  to  the  upbuilding  and 
improvement  of  town  and  county.  He  is  well  known  in  fraternal  circles,  holding 
membership  in  the  lodge,  chapter  and  commandery  of  the  Masons,  and  he 
likewise  has  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Elks  and  other 
organizations. 

In  politics  he  is  an  active  republican,  recognized  as  one  of  the  leaders  of  his 
party  in  Black  Hawk  county.  He  was  elected  and  served  as  county  attorney  for 
eight  years  and  he  has  been  local  attorney  for  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad  Com- 
pany for  a  similar  period.  Fle  is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  public  wel- 
fare and  is  remiss  in  no  duty  of  citizenship,  yet  concentrates  his  efforts  most 
largely  upon  his  profession,  and  his  legal  learning,  his  analytical  mind  and  the 
readiness  with  which  he  grasps  the  points  in  an  argument  combine  to  make  hini 
one  of  the  strong  members  of  the  Iowa  bar. 


GEORGE  N.  GARRETTSON. 

George  N.  Garrettson  is  the  vice  president  of  the  Iowa  State  Bank  of  Waterloo 
and  through  the  entire  period  of  his  residence  in  this  city  has  been  connected  with 
banking  interests.  He  is  a  native  of  Huntingdon,  Pennsylvania,  and  was  there 
reared  and  educated,  pursuing  a  public-school  course  of  study.  After  putting  aside 
his  text-books  he  was  connected  with  various  lines  of  business  before  coming  to 
Waterloo  in  1899.  Here  he  entered  banking  circles  as  an  employe  of  the  Com- 
mercial National  Bank,  with  which  fie  was  connected  for  four  or  five  years,  but 
wishing  to  have  his  efforts  more  directly  benefit  himself,  he  then  joined  with 
others  in  organizing  the  Iowa  State  Bank,  of  which  he  was  cashier  for  a  time. 
Later  he  was  elected  vice  president  and  is  now  the  second  officer  of  the  institu- 
tion. Its  business  policy  has  ever  been  a  safe,  conservative  one  which  commends 
the  bank  to  the  patronage  of  the  public,  and  as  vice  president  Mr.  Garrettson  is 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  75 

active  in  carrying  forward  the  business  of  the  bank,  which  has  been  estabhshed 
on  a  safe  basis  and  is  enjoying  continuous  growth  year  by  year.  He  is  also  one 
of  the  directors  of  the  Iowa  Manufacturers  Fire  Insurance  Company  and  is  con- 
nected with  other  business  interests  which  contribute  to  the  growth  and  up- 
building of  the  city  as  well  as  to  individual  success. 

In  1913  Mr.  Garrettson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jessie  Manson,  of 
Waterloo.  They  attend  the  Presbyterian  church  and  are  widely  known  and 
popular  in  social  circles  of  the  city.  Mr.  Garrettson  is  also  popular  in  Masonry 
as  a  Knight  Templar  and  has  membership  in  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  to  the  Waterloo  Club, 
and  no  plan  or  project  for  the  upbuilding  and  benefit  of  the  city  and  county 
seeks  his  aid  in  vain.  He  neglects  no  duty  public  or  private  and  as  the  years 
have  gone  by  he  has  become  most  firmly  established  in  the  regard  and  good-will 
of  his  fellow  citizens. 


W.  H.  BRUNN. 


W.  H.  Brunn  was  born  in  1873  in  the  city  in  which  he  yet  makes  his  home, 
his  father  being  D.  H.  Brunn,  who  came  to  Waterloo  in  the  early  '50s  and  cast 
in  his  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers.  He  was  a  stationary  engineer,  spending  the 
active  years  of  his  life  at  that  work,  but  at  the  present  time  he  is  living  retired. 
He  realized  the  value  and  worth  of  education  and  gave  to  his  son  W.  H.  Brunn 
every  possible  advantage  along  that  line.  The  latter  was  a  pubHc-school  pupil 
in  W^aterloo  and  later  entered  Cornell  College.  His  professional  course  was 
pursued  in  the  law  department  of  the  Iowa  State  University,  in  which  he  won  his 
LL.  B.  degree  upon  graduation  with  the  class  of  1897.  He  then  practiced  for 
two  years  at  Reinbeck,  Iowa,  in  partnership  with  W.  N.  Birdsall  and  in  1899  he 
came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  entered  into  partnership  with  Wirt  P.  Hoxie,  with 
whom  he  has  since  been  associated,  the  firm  of  Hoxie  &  Brunn  being  today  one 
of  the  strongest  at  the  Black  Flawk  county  bar.  He  practices  in  all  the  state  and 
federal  courts  and  is  a  member  of  the  county  bar  association.  The  zeal  with 
which  he  has  devoted  his  energies  to  his  profession,  the  careful  regard  evinced 
for  the  interests  of  his  clients  and  an  assiduous  and  unrelaxing  attention  to  all 
the  details  of  his  cases  have  brought  him  a  large  business  and  made  him  very 
successful  in  its  conduct. 

Aside  from  his  law  practice  Mr.  Brunn  is  the  secretary  of  the  Waterloo  Build- 
ing &  Loan  Association  and  is  financially  connected  with  a  number  of  the  leading 
business  and  manufacturing  interests  of  Waterloo — interests  which  contribute  to 
public  prosperity  and  progress  as  well  as  to  individual  success.  In  business  affairs 
his  judgment  is  sound,  his  sagacity  keen  and  he  readily  discriminates  between  the 
essential  and  the  nonessential. 

In  1900  Mr.  Brunn  was  married  to  Miss  Addie  Felsing,  and  they  have  one 
daughter  and  one  son,  Ruth  and  Roger.  The  parents  attend  the  Evangelical 
church  and  in  social  circles  of  the  city  occupy  a  prominent  position.  Mr.  Brunn 
holds  membership  in  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade.  He 
belongs  also  to  the  Masons,  Elks,  Odd  Fellows  and  Knights  of  Pythias  lodges 


76 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 


and  in  his  life  exemplifies  the  beneficent  spirit  which  is  the  underlying  principle 
of  those  organizations.  He  served  as  assistant  county  attorney  for  three  years 
and  is  now  secretary  of  the  east  side  school  district.  His  political  allegiance  has 
always  been  given  to  the  republican  party,  but,  while  undoubtedly  he  is  not  with- 
out that  honorable  ambition  which  is  so  powerful  and  useful  as  an  incentive  to 
activity  in  public  afi:'airs,  he  regards  the  pursuits  of  private  life  as  being  in  them- 
selves abundantly  worthy  of  his  best  efforts.  His  is  a  character  that  subordinates 
personal  ambition  to  public  good  and  seeks  rather  the  benefit  of  others  than  the 
aggrandizement  of  self. 


HON.  REA  CARL  THOMPSON. 

The  Hon.  Rea  Carl  Thompson,  mayor  of  Waterloo,  has  been  closely  identi- 
fied with  business,  public  and  political  interests  in  the  city  for  a  number  of  years 
and  has  risen  to  a  place  of  prominence.  His  life  record  stands  in  contradistinc- 
tion to  the  old  adage  that  a  prophet  is  never  without  honor  save  in  his  own 
country,  for  he  is  a  native  son  of  the  eity  in  which  he  has  been  called  to  the 
position  of  chief  executive.  He  was  born  February  13,  1873,  a  son  of  John  and 
Mary  (Carl)  Thompson,  the  former  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  the  latter  of 
Ohio.  The  family  comes  of  Scotch  ancestry,  the  great-grandfather  having  been 
a  native  of  Scotland  and  the  founder  of  the  family  in  the  new  world.  The  Carl 
family  is  descended  from  ancestors  from  the  north  of  Ireland.  In  the  year 
1849  John  Thompson  removed  westward  to  Iowa,  settling  in  Linn  county,  and 
the  same  year,  attracted  by  the  gold  discoveries  in  California,  made  his  way  to 
the  Pacific  coast,  where  he  spent  some  time  in  a  search  for  the  precious  metal. 
Following  his  return  to  Iowa  he  brought  his  family  to  Waterloo  in  1852  and  for 
many  years  he  was  head  miller  in  a  mill  of  this  city.  He  also  served  for  fifteen 
years  as  constable  in  Waterloo  and  his  record  as  a  business  man  and  as  an  official 
is  equally  creditable.  He  passed  away  December  31,  1900,  after  a  residence  of 
about  a  half  century  in  \\^aterloo,  but  his  widow  still  survives  and  makes  her 
home  in  this  city. 

Rea  C.  Thompson  attended  the  public  schools  of  Waterloo  to  the  age  of  fifteen 
years  and  afterward  pursued  a  course  in  a  business  college  of  Waterloo,  from 
which  he  was  graduated.  Subsequently  he  began  learning  the  printer's  trade  and 
in  1901  he  purchased  the  Guthrie  County  (la.)  Republican,  a  weekly  paper, 
which  he  conducted  for  about  a  year.  He  then  sold  out  and  returned  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  opened  a  job  office,  which  he  conducted  from  1902  until  1904.  He  then 
disposed  of  that  business  and  in  the  spring  of  1905  was  elected  city  clerk,  which 
position  he  occupied  continuously  until  191 2,  when  he  was  chosen  mayor  of 
Waterloo.  He  made  such  an  excellent  record  during  his  first  term  of  service 
that  he  was  reelected  in  191 4  and  is  now  the  incumbent  in  that  office.  He  was 
the  first  mayor  elected  from  the  west  side  and  the  first  one  to  carry  the  entire 
ticket  with  him.  He  has  proven  a  popular  official  because  of  the  value  and  worth 
of  his  public  service  and  his  well  known  devotion  to  the  public  welfare.  His 
administration  is  businesslike  and  progressive  and  has  resulted  in  bringing  about 
various  needed  reforms  and  improvements. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  77 

Mr.  Thompson  has  a  military  chapter  in  his  Hfe  history  inasmuch  as  he  was 
a  member  of  Company  B,  Forty-ninth  Iowa  National  Guard,  for  five  years,  and 
served  for  three  years  as  its  first  lieutenant.  In  this  he  followed  in  the  footsteps 
of  his  father,  who  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  joined  the  Union  army  and  was 
a  sergeant  in  a  regiment  of  infantry,  with  which  he  participated  in  a  number 
of  hotly  contested  engagements. 

In  his  political  views  Rea  C.  Thompson  has  ever  been  a  stalwart  republican 
since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  and  he  does  everything  in 
his  power  to  promote  the  growth  and  insure  the  success  of  his  party.  Fraternally 
he  is  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  with  the  Elks,  the 
Moose  and  the  Eagles,  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Club  and 
the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  being  in  hearty  sympathy  with  their  purpose  to  pro- 
mote the  development,  upbuilding  and  welfare  of  the  city.  He  is  widely  and 
favorably  known  and  has  a  circle  of  friends  almost  coextensive  with  the  circle 
of  his  acquaintance.  As  he  has  been  continuously  in  office  for  ten  years,  there  is 
no  reason  to  question  the  excellence  of  the  record  which  he  has  made,  that  being 
self-evident.  Many  tangible  evidences  of  his  public  spirit  can  be  cited  and  he 
belongs  to  that  class  of  patriotic  American  citizens  who  have  ever  made  private 
interests  subservient  to  the  public  good. 


lOHN  G.  RALSTON. 


John  G.  Ralston,  of  Waterloo,  who  has  gained  considerable  prominence  as 
an  architect,  was  born  in  Benton  county,  Iowa,  on  the  3d  of  October,  1870,  a  son 
of  James  and  Elizabeth  (Graham)  Ralston.  Both  of  his  parents  were  born  near 
Madison,  Indiana,  and  there  the  father  engaged  in  the  harness  business.  In  1868 
the  family  removed  from  the  Hoosier  state  to  Iowa  and  located  at  Vinton,  Benton 
county,  where  the  father  continued  in  the  same  business  and  resided  there  until 
his  death,  which  occurred  in  1904.  His  widow  now  makes  her  home  with  the 
subject  of  this  review. 

John  G.  Ralston  was  the  fourth  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  eight  children 
and,  as  his  parents  appreciated  the  value  of  good  education,  he  received  excellent 
advantages  along  that  line.  After  attending  the  public  schools  of  Benton  county 
he  was  a  student  in  Tilford  Academy.  On  attaining  his  majority  he  learned  the 
carpenter's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  five  years  and  then  engaged  in  the  con- 
tracting business  in  connection  with  W.  F.  Murphy,  of  Waterloo,  becoming  a 
resident  of  this  city  in  1897.  Mr.  Murphy  died  in  1904  and  since  that  time 
Mr.  Ralston  has  conducted  the  business  alone.  In  1907  he  began  to  design  build- 
ings as  well  as  erect  them  and  one  year  later  abandoned  the  contracting  business 
and  has  since  done  architectural  work  exclusively.  His  experience  as  a  carpenter 
and  contractor  has  been  of  great  aid  to  him  in  his  later  work,  as  it  has  enabled  him 
to  make  his  plans  practical  and  to  adapt  them  to  the  material  to  be  used,  the 
desired  cost  and  other  conditions.  His  ability  has  gained  him  wide  recognition 
and  clients  come  to  him  from  all  over  Iowa  as  well  as  a  number  of  other  states. 
He  devotes  his  entire  time  and  attention  to  his  rapidly  growing  business  interests 
and  the  fact  that  he  does  not  dissipate  his  energies  over  several  fields  of  work  is 


78  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

a  potent  factor  in  his  success.  He  has  invested  to  a  considerable  extent  in  real 
estate,  buying  valuable  city  property. 

Mr.  Ralston  was  married  in  June,  1897,  to  Miss  Gertrude  Verharen,  who  was 
born  in  Rock  Island,  Illinois,  and  is  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Tabitha  (Sheriff) 
Verharen,  natives  of  Germany  and  of  Illinois  respectively.  Her  father,  who  was 
an  undertaker  and  furniture  dealer,  came  to  Iowa  in  the  '70s  and  located  at 
Vinton,  where  he  established  a  profitable  business.  He  passed  away  there  in 
1904  and  his  widow  now  resides  in  Waterloo.  He  served  in  the  Civil  war  in  the 
Ninety-third  Illinois  Volunteers  and  was  as  patriotic  in  exercising  his  right  of 
suffrage  as  upon  the  battlefields  of  the  south.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ralston  have  two 
children :  Glen  E.,  who  was  born  on  the  30th  of  March,  1903 ;  and  Richard  V., 
born  on  the  i8th  of  March,  1908.    Both  children  are  in  school. 

Mr.  Ralston  is  a  republican  but  has  never  aspired  to  ofiice,  being  content  to 
leave  to  others  the  responsibilities  of  official  position.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Masonic  order  and  has  taken  the  Knights  Templar  degree  in  the  York  Rite,  in 
which  he  has  served  as  commander.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Mystic  Shrine  and 
has  other  fraternal  connections,  as  he  holds  membership  in  the  Knights  of  Pythias 
and  the  Moose.  All  who  have  been  associated  with  Mr.  Ralston,  whether  in 
business  or  social  relations,  have  found  him  upright,  courteous  and  kindly. 


H.  O.  KELLEY. 


H.  O.  Kelley  is  secretary  of  the  Retail  Merchants  Association  of  Waterloo,  in 
which  connection  he  is  doing  important  work  to  further  the  interests  of  the  or- 
ganization and  to  promote  the  welfare  of  its  members  through  the  extension  of 
the  trade  relations  of  the  city.  Thirteen  years  have  come  and  gone  since  he 
arrived  in  Waterloo — a  young  man  of  twenty-seven  years.  He  was  born  in 
Bureau  county,  Illinois,  in  1874,  and  spent  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth 
in  that  state.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  of  Illinois  and 
after  leaving  school  he  engaged  in  the  drug  business  in  his  native  state  for  about 
four  years.  Failing  health  obliged  him  to  secure  outdoor  work  and  he  came  to 
Waterloo  in  1901.  He  was  then  with  the  Rock  Island  until  1905,  at  which  time 
he  became  traffic  manager  for  the  Iowa  Dairy  Manufacturing  Company  of 
Waterloo,  remaining  in  active  connection  with  that  business  for  about  eight  years. 
On  the  1st  of  January,  1913,  he  embarked  in^the  general  commission  business 
and  on  the  ist  of  May,  of  the  same  year,  he  took  charge  of  his  present  office 
as  secretary  of  the  Waterloo  Retail  Merchants  Association.  His  previous 
varied  experience,  his  study  of  conditions  and  the  knowledge  that  he  had  acquired 
through  reading  and  observation  well  qualified  him  for  the  work  which  he  un- 
dertook in  this  connection  and  there  is  general  satisfaction  manifest  concerning 
his  efforts. 

In  1901  Mr.  Kelley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Katherine  Shain,  of 
La  Harpe,  Illinois.  He  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge.  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M..  of 
which  he  is  a  past  master,  and  he  has  membership  in  the  Town  Criers  Club. 
Advancement  has  come  to  him  along  lines  of  increasing  usefulness  and  he  is 
today  occupying  a  position  of  importance,  for  Waterloo  is  a  growing,  vigorous 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  79 

and  aggressive  city.  Moreover,  it  is  a  recognized  fact  that  efficiency  is  best 
promoted  through  organization  and  that  expert  knowledge  of  trade  conditions 
must  precede  the  greatest  advancement.  Mr.  Kelley  is  qualified  to  meet  all  the 
requirements  of  his  position  and  as  secretary  of  the  association  is  actively  en- 
gaged in  advancing  the  interests  of  the  retail  merchants  of  Waterloo. 


GEORGE  ELVIN  BICKLEY. 

George  Elvin  Bickley  is  general  manager  of  the  Corn  Belt  Telephone  Com- 
pany at  Waterloo  and  is  one  of  the  city's  progressive  and  representative  resi- 
dents. Along  the  path  of  industry  and  efficiency  he  has  advanced  to  the  plane 
of  affluence  and  while  carefully  and  systematically  conducting  his  business  aflfairs, 
actuated  by  laudable  ambition,  he  has  at  the  same  time  recognized  and  improved 
his  opportunities.  Mr.  Bickley  was  born  in  Waterloo  on  the  19th  of  November, 
1874,  and  is  a  son  of  Samuel  B.  and  Susanna  (Klingaman)  Bickley,  the  former  a 
native  of  Westmoreland  county  and  the  latter  of  Somerset  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania. The  father,  however,  was  reared  in  Ohio  from  his  third  year  and  in 
1865  came  to  Waterloo,  being  then  a  young  man.  The  same  year  Susanna 
Klingaman  accompanied  her  parents  on  their  removal  to  Waterloo,  she  being  at 
that  time  a  young  woman  of  seventeen  years.  Mr.  Bickley  carried  on  general 
agricultural  pursuits  as  a  life  work  and  as  the  years  went  on  prospered  in  his 
undertaking,  winning  a  substantial  competence  that  now  enables  him  to  live 
retired.  He  makes  his  home  in  Waterloo,  where  he  is  enjoying  a  well  earned 
rest,  and  his  life,  honorable  and  upright  at  all  times,  has  won  him  the  high 
regard  of  his  fellow  townsmen. 

George  E.  Bickley  was  reared  at  home  and  was  educated  in  the  city  schools 
of  Waterloo  and  the  University  of  Wisconsin,  where  he  pursued  a  special  course 
in  electrical  engineering.  Following  the  completion  of  his  studies  in  1895  he 
found  employment  with  the  Cedar  Valley  Telephone  Company  of  Waterloo,  in 
which  connection  he  has  steadily  worked  his  way  upward,  and  in  1898  he  was 
made  superintendent  of  the  company.  In  1901  he  went  west  to  Denver,  Colo- 
rado, and  accepted  a  position  as  inspector  of  the  Colorado  Bell  Telephone  Com- 
pany. One  year  later  he  was  made  wire  chief,  in  which  capacity  he  continued 
until  1907,  when  he  returned  to  Waterloo  to  accept  the  superintendency  of  the 
plant  department  of  the  Corn  Belt  Telephone  Company,  formerly  the  Cedar 
Valley  Telephone  Company.  In  1910  he  was  made  superintendent  of  the  plant 
as  well  as  superintendent  of  the  Cedar  Rapids  &  Marion  plants  and  in  Septem- 
ber, 1913,  he  was  further  advanced  to  the  position  of  general  manager  of  the 
Corn  Belt  Telephone  Company  at  the  time  of  the  consolidation  of  the  various 
companies  in  this  part  of  the  state.  He  still  holds  a  directorate  in  the  Cedar 
Rapids  &  Marion  Company  as  well  as  in  the  Corn  Belt  Company  and  he  is 
likewise  a  director  of  the  Home  Building  &  Loan  Company  of  Waterloo.  He 
is  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  telephone  business  and  his  experience  well 
qualifies  him  for  the  onerous  and  responsible  duties  which  devolve  upon  him  in 
this  connection.  His  ability  has  developed  as  the  years  have  gone  on  and  he  is 
now  devoting  his   attention   to  executive  control   and   administrative   direction. 


80  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

carefully  looking  after  all  the  details  of  the  business  and  controlling  the  efforts 
of  those  who  serve  under  him. 

In  1 90 1  Mr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Myrtle  E.  Kelley,  of 
Waterloo,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children,  Dorothy  Helen, 
George  Francis  and  Mildred  Elsie.  Mr.  Bickley  votes  with  the  republican  party 
and  his  fraternal  connections  are  with  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.; 
Iowa  Consistory,  No.  2,  A.  &  A.  S.  R..  of  Cedar  Rapids;  and  El  Kahir  Temple, 
A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  also  of  Cedar  Rapids.  He  is  likewise  connected  with  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  and  with  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club.  He  ranks  today 
among  the  foremost  citizens  of  Black  Hawk  county.  He  keeps  in  touch  with 
the  trend  of  modern  thought  and  progress,  understands  the  conditions  which 
affect  the  welfare  of  community,  state  and  nation  and  at  all  times  uses  his  aid 
and  influence  on  the  side  of  advancement  and  improvement. 


GEORGE  WILLIAM  CLARK. 

No  history  of  Cedar  Falls  or  of  Black  Haw^k  county  would  be  complete  were 
there  failure  to  make  extended  reference  to  George  William  Clark,  now  one  of 
the  venerable  citizens  and  honored  pioneer  settlers  of  this  part  of  the  state.  In 
many  ways  he  has  been  closely  identified  with  its  histor}^  and  has  cooperated  in 
many  lines  of  work  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  the  community.  He  was 
born  in  Riga,  Monroe  county.  New  York,  August  30,  1833,  a  son  of  Ebenezer  and 
Lois  (Knowles)  Clark.  The  father  was  born  in  Berkshire  county,  Massachusetts, 
February  27,  1787,  and  the  mother  was  born  September  2,  1792.  The  father, 
who  followed  farming  as  a  life  work,  died  in  Riga,  New  York,  after  w^hich  the 
mother  came  to  Iowa  and  passed  away  at  the  home  of  her  son,  George  William, 
in  Cedar  Falls.  At  different  times  Ebenezer  Clark  held  local  offices  and  in  various 
ways  contributed  to  the  improvement  and  upbuilding  of  the  district  in  which 
he  lived. 

George  W.  Clark  was  an  only  child.  He  attended  the  district  schools  of  Riga 
Comers,  New  York,  was  for  two  terms  a  student  at  Churchville,  New  York,  and 
spent  one  winter  in  an  academy  at  Riga  Corners.  All  through  his  life  he  has  been 
learning  valuable  lessons  in  the  school  of  experience  until  his  knowledge  is  now 
broad,  especially  in  connection  with  those  practical  phases  of  life  which  lead  to 
success  in  business  undertakings.  He  was  but  sixteen  years  of  age  at  the  time 
of  his  father's  death,  after  which  he  operated  the  homestead  for  a  year,  at  the 
end  of  which  time  the  property  was  sold.  He  attended  school  the  following  winter 
and  the  succeeding  spring  he  worked  for  an  uncle  on  a  farm,  being  thus  em- 
ployed until  the  following  July.  In  1851  he  made  his  way  to  the  middle  west, 
settling  first  in  Janesville,  Wisconsin,  where  he  clerked  in  a  store  until  the  spring 
of  1854.  In  March  of  that  year,  in  company  with  Thomas  Scarcliff,  he  went  to 
Independence,  Iowa,  making  his  way  after  a  few  weeks  to  Waterloo,  and  from 
that  point  walked  to  Cedar  Falls.  Here  he  obtained  employment  in  a  store  as  a 
clerk,  but  after  three  months  he  went  wath  Mr.  Scarcliff  to  Dubuque,  Iowa,  and 
thence  by  boat  to  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  where  he  attended  a  Fourth  of  July  cele- 
bration.   At  that  time  St.  Paul  contained  but  a  few  slab  shanties,  being  a  typical 


MES.  GEORGE  W.  CLARK 


GEORGE  W.  CLARK 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  85 

town  of  the  western  frontier.  He  remained  there  for  a  week  and  then  returned 
to  New  York  on  a  visit.  On  the  ist  of  October,  1854,  he  again  came  to  Cedar 
Falls  and  soon  afterward  purchased  ten  acres  of  timber  land  north  of  the  city. 
In  December,  1854,  he  once  more  went  to  Janesville,  Wisconsin,  where  he  visited 
for  a  time  and  where  he  was  married  in  January,  1855. 

Mr.  Clark  returned  to  Cedar  Falls  in  the  latter  part  of  that  month  and  in 
February  he  hired  a  man  to  cut  logs  and  bank  them  on  the  stream.  Later  he 
i-afted  these  down  the  river  to  a  sawmill  at  Cedar  Falls,  had  the  logs  sawed  and 
i)uilt  a  bam.  It  was  his  intention  to  engage  in  the  livery  business,  which  he  did 
in  this  bam  on  Second  street.  He  conducted  a  small  livery  business  for  a  time,  but 
in  1856  sold  out  and  purchased  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  between  Waterloo  and 
Cedar  Falls  which  he  afterward  traded  for  a  farm  across  the  river.  He  likewise 
purchased  a  five  acre  tract  of  timber  land  and  engaged  in  cutting  the  logs  and 
milling  them.  He  then  fenced  his  twenty-three  acres  of  land,  which  he  continued 
to  cultivate  for  three  years,  although  during  that  period  he  resided  in  Cedar  Falls, 
having  in  the  meantime  built  a  residence  on  the  corner  of  Main  and  Sixth  streets. 
A  part  of  that  house  is  still  standing.  In  1861,  when  the  war  broke  out,  he  had 
two  lots  on  Iowa  street  and  thereon  he  built  a  house  which  he  occupied  after  the 
fall  of  1 86 1.  On  the  ist  of  January,  1862,  he  engaged  in  the  draying  business, 
having  at  first  but  one  horse.  He  conducted  the  business  for  one  year  in  a  small 
way  and  then  more  extensively,  keeping  three  rigs  and  hiring  two  men.  About 
that  time  he  purchased  the  bus  and  team  belonging  to  the  hotel  and  established 
a  bus  and  transfer  line.  He  continued  in  the  omnibus  business  for  fifteen  years, 
at  the  end  of  which  time  he  sold  out,  but  continued  the  draying  business  from 
January,  1862,  until  1882.  In  the  meantime  he  purchased  a  farm  on  the  Waterloo 
road  in  the  spring  of  1874  and  hired  a  man  to  operate  it  for  a  short  time.  In 
August  of  that  year,  however,  he  took  possession  of  the  place  and  carried  on 
farming  in  connection  with  his  draying  and  transfer  business,  remaining  upon 
that  place  for  about  eighteen  years,  during  which  time  he  made  many  substantial 
improvements. 

Mr.  Clark  returned  to  Cedar  Falls  in  April,  1892,  and  has  resided  here  con- 
tinuously since.  From  the  spring  of  1892  until  1896  he  lived  practically  retired, 
but  in  the  latter  year  purchased  another  dray  line  and  conducted  the  business  for 
fifteen  years,  when  he  sold  out  on  the  15th  of  July,  191 1.  Since  that  time  he  has 
lived  retired.  He  is  still,  however,  a  stockholder  in  a  broom  factory  and  he  is  the 
owner  of  the  lot  on  which  his  residence  is  situated  and  a  tract  four  rods  square 
on  the  adjoining  lot,  on  which  he  has  built  a  warehouse.  His  business  affairs 
have  been  judiciously  conducted  and  capably  managed  and  as  the  years  have  gone 
by  diligence,  determination  and  industry  have  brought  him  substantial  success. 

On  the  14th  of  January,  1855,  Mr.  Clark  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Fanny 
Frazer  Streeter,  who  was  born  at  Clifton  Springs,  Ontario  county,  New  York,  a 
daughter  of  Simeon  Dexter  and  Abonene  S.  (Donaldson)  Streeter,  the  former  a 
native  of  Massachusetts,  while  the  latter  was  born  near  Otsego,  New  York.  Her 
father  engaged  in  the  clothing  business  in  early  life  and  also  in  manufacturing  cloth 
in  New  York.  He  died  and  was  buried  at  Lyons,  New  York,  after  which  his 
widow  went  to  Janesville,  Wisconsin,  with  her  family  and  later  removed  to  Chicago 
to  live  with  her  son,  there  passing  away  in  i860.  Mr.  Streeter  held  the  office  of 
constable  in  Vienna,  New  York,  and  he  conducted  the  Farmers'  Resort  Hotel  at 

V.il.  II— r> 


86  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Clifton  Springs.  It  was  there  that  Mrs.  Clark  was  born,  the  sixth  in  order  of 
birth  in  a  family  of  ten  children.  Four  brothers  served  throughout  the  Civil  war 
and  one  of  them  died  in  Libby  prison.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Clark  became  the  parents 
of  nine  children:  William  R.,  who  has  been  an  engineer  on  the  Illinois  Central 
Railroad  for  a  quarter  of  a  century  and  now  resides  at  Fort  Dodge,  Iowa ;  Clara 
R.,  the  wife  of  J.  E.  Bates,  who  is  engaged  in  the  insurance  business  in  Waterloo ; 
Tibbie  S.,  who  died  at  the  age  of  two  years ;  Nettie  Eva,  the  wife  of  C.  INI.  Wyne- 
koop,  engaged  in  the  cigar  and  tobacco  business  at  Cedar  Falls ;  Arthur,  who  died 
in  infancy;  George  Byron,  who  resides  at  the  corner  of  Fourth  and  Tremont 
streets  in  Cedar  Falls  and  is  engaged  in  merchandising;  Luther,  who  died  in 
infancy;  Mary  Alice,  who  married  A.  B.  Mason,  a  traveling  salesman  living  in 
Cedar  Falls ;  and  the  youngest,  who  died  in  infancy. 

Mr.  Clark  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  W^orkmen  and  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  on  many  occasions  but  is  some- 
what independent  in  his  political  connections.  He  is  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers 
of  the  county  and  brought  to  this  district  the  first  piano  in  Cedar  Falls  or 
Black  Hawk  county.  He  was  also  the  owner  of  the  first  kerosene  lamp  in  Cedar 
Falls  and  paid  a  dollar  and  a  half  per  gallon  for  oil.  This  was  as  much  a  matter 
of  marvel  in  those  days  as  was  the  introduction  of  electric  lights  in  the  present 
generation.  Mr.  Clark  has  lived  to  witness  notable  changes  in  this  section  of 
the  state.  He  has  passed  the  eighty-first  milestone  on  life's  journey— years 
covering  a  momentous  period  in  the  history  of  the  country.  He  has  seen  the 
building  of  railroads,  has  witnessed  the  introduction  of  the  telegraph  and  the 
telephone  and  has  seen  progress  along  every  line  of  business  life.  His  influence 
has  always  been  on  the  side  of  advancement  and  improvement  during  the  period 
of  his  connection  with  Black  Hawk  county  and  he  has  ever  been  highly  esteemed 
as  a  valued  citizen.  He  is  today  one  of  the  venerable  residents  of  Cedar  Falls, 
respected  and  honored  by  all  who  know  him. 


WILLIAM  GALLOW^AY. 

William  Galloway  occupies  a  central  place  on  the  stage  of  business  activity  in 
Waterloo  and  Black  Hawk  county,  being  identified  with  various  business  interests 
which  are  important  factors  in  advancing  the  material  progress  and  business  activ- 
ity of  this  section  of  the  state.  He  is  the  president  of  the  William  Galloway  Com 
pany,  the  president  of  the  Galloway  Investment  Company  and  president  of  the 
Galloway  Brothers  Company  and  is  thus  widely  known  in  connection  with  the 
industrial,  commercial  and  financial  interests  of  his  section.  He  was  born  in 
Berlin,  Iowa,  in  1877,  and  supplemented  a  public-school  course  by  study  in  Mon- 
mouth College  at  Monmouth.  Illinois.  He  started  upon  his  business  career  by 
selling  specialities,  driving  through  the  country  with  a  horse  and  buggy  and  visit- 
ing the  farmhouses  en  route.  He  afterward  entered  the  employ  of  an  implement 
dealer  at  Reinbeck,  Iowa,  and  in  time  was  admitted  to  a  partnership  in  the  busi- 
ness. After  considerable  experience  in  that  line  he  became  a  traveling  salesman 
in  the  implement  and  farm-machinery  business  and  thus  gradually  advanced  step 
by  step,  gaining  continually  a  broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  87 

In  1901  Mr.  Galloway  came  to  Waterloo  and  the  following  year  laid  the  foun- 
dation for  his  present  large  interests  by  beginning  business  as  a  jobber  in  agri- 
cultural implements.  Later  he  began  manufacturing  on  a  small  scale,  his  first 
plant  being  located  on  Falls  avenue.  From  the  beginning,  however,  the  business 
steadily  increased  in  volume  and  eventually  the  plant  of  the  Cascaden  Manu- 
facturing Company  was  purchased  and  the  business  incorporated  in  1906  with  a 
capital  stock  of  one  hundred  thousand  dollars.  The  business  grew  with  marvelous 
rapidity  and  led  to  an  increase  in  the  capital  stock  to  two  hundred  thousand  dol- 
lars and  later  to  four  hundred  thousand  dollars,  while  the  present  capitalization  of 
the  company  is  three  million  five  hundred  thousand  dollars.  Their  factories,  their 
fine  office  building  and  the  building  of  the  Agriculture  Club,  which  they  organized, 
cover  about  fourteen  acres  and  in  addition  the  William  Galloway  Company  also 
owns  a  tract  of  four  hundred  acres  of  fine  land  between  the  plant  and  Cedar  Falls. 
The  output  includes  gasoline  engines,  spreaders,  cream  separators,  portable  ele- 
vators, wagons,  harrows  and  many  other  implements  and  their  employes  number 
from  four  hundred  to  nine  hundred,  according  to  the  season.  The  business  runs 
up  annually  to  the  two  million  dollar  mark  in  volume.  This  is  one  of  the  most 
extensive  and  important  manufacturing  concerns  of  central  Iowa.  The  work  has 
been  carefully  systematized  in  every  particular  and  in  the  conduct  of  the  business 
quality  is  never  sacrificed  to  quantity.  The  enterprise  is  the  outcome  of  the  busi- 
ness ability,  capable  management  and  laudable  ambition  of  William  Galloway,  who 
has  ever  eagerly  embraced  his  legitimate  opportunities  and  along  the  path  of 
indefatigable  industry  and  activity  has  advanced  to  the  goal  of  success,  his  interests 
at  all  times  conforming  to  the  highest  commercial  standards. 

The  upbuilding  of  such  an  institution  would  alone  entitle  Mr.  Galloway  to  rep- 
resentation among  the  foremost  citizens  of  Black  Hawk  county,  yet  this  does 
not  cover  the  scope  of  his  activities  and  business  interests,  for  he  also  organized 
the  Galloway  Investment  Company,  of  which  he  is  the  president  and  which  was 
incorporated  with  a  capital  stock  of  three  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars,  of 
which  two  hundred  thousand  dollars  has  been  paid  up.  The  company  buys,  plats 
and  sells  real  estate  and  has  platted  some  of  the  principal  additions  to  Waterloo, 
including  the  Galloway  addition.  Prospect  Hill,  Cedar  Heights  and  Meadow  Dale. 
Mr.  Galloway  also  organized  the  Galloway  Brothers  Company,  capitalized  for 
five  hundred  thousand  dollars,  and  of  this  he  is  likewise  the  president.  The  last 
named  company  handles  all  kinds  of  farm,  field  and  flower  seeds  and  the  business 
amounts  to  upwards  of  two  hundred  thousand  dollars  annually  and  covers  large 
sections  of  the  United  States  and  Canada,  while  shipments  are  sent  to  thirty-two 
foreign  countries. 

In  1901  Mr.  Galloway  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Naomi  Murray,  of 
Reinbeck,  Iowa',  and  to  them  have  been  born  five  children,  William  Ross,  Dwight 
Murray,  David  John,  Mary  Naomi  and  Frances  Elizabeth.  The  family  are  mem- 
bers of  the  United  Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  Galloway  also  belongs  to  the  Com- 
mercial Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Waterloo  Club 
and  the  Town  Criers  Club,  all  of  which  organizations  have  for  their  object  the 
development,  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the  city  and  the  extension  of  its 
trade  relations. 

Mr.  Galloway  has  not  only  been  a  cooperant  factor  in  many  measures  for  the 
benefit  of  Waterloo,  but  has  also  instituted  and  promoted  a  number  of  such.     In 


88  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

an  analyzation  of  his  record  and  his  career  it  must  be  recog-nized  that  balance, 
harmony  and  sound  judgment  are  his  native  traits.  Anyone  meeting  Mr.  Galloway 
face  to  face  would  know  at  once  that  he  is.  an  individual  embodying  all  the  ele- 
ments of  what  in  this  country  we  term  a  "square"  man — one  in  whom  to  have 
confidence,  a  dependable  man  in  any  relation  and  any  emergency.  His  quietude 
of  deportment,  his  easy  dignity,  his  frankness  and  cordiality  of  address,  with  a 
total  absence  of  anything  sinister  or  anything  to  conceal,  foretoken  a  man  who  is 
ready  to  meet  any  obligation  of  life  with  the  confidence  and  courage  that  come  of 
conscious  personal  ability,  a  right  conception  of  things  and  a  habitual  regard  for 
what  is  best  in  the  exercise  of  human  activities. 


T.  E.  RUST. 


T.  E.  Rust  is  the  chief  engineer  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Rail- 
road and  for  five  years  has  been  a  resident  of  Waterloo.  He  was  born  in  Saginaw, 
Michigan,  and  during  his  childhood  days  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal 
to  Denver,  Colorado,  where  the  period  of  his  youth  was  largely  passed.  He 
attended  the  schools  of  that  city  and  then  returned  to  his  native  state  for  his 
collegiate  course,  entering  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor.  He  has 
devoted  the  last  fifteen  or  sixteen  years  of  his  life  to  engineering  and  was  with  the 
Denver  &  Rio  Grande  Railroad  in  connection  with  the  work  of  construction,  loca- 
tion and  maintenance.  He  was  also  active  in  the  construction  of  the  White  Pass 
&  Yukon  Railroad  of  Alaska  and  he  afterward  became  chief  assistant  engineer  of 
the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railroad,  at  which  time  L.  S.  Cass,  also  of  Waterloo, 
was  its  vice  president.  It  was  his  acquaintance  with  Mr.  Cass  which  won  for 
him  his  present  responsible  position.  In  May,  1909,  he  came  to  Waterloo  as  chief 
engineer  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  and  in  that  capacity 
has  had  charge  of  the  construction  of  the  road,  building  the  Waverly  extension 
from  Denver  Junction  to  Waverly  and  also  the  Cedar  Rapids  extension. 


C.  M.  CHENEY. 


C.  M.  Cheney  is  general  freight  and  passenger  agent  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar 
Falls  &  Northern  Railroad.  Practically  his  entire  life  has  been  spent  in  railroad 
service  and  his  advancement  has  come  to  him  as  the  logical  result  of  close 
application,  diligence  and  ability.  For  twelve  years  he  has  made  his  home  in 
Waterloo  and  throughout  the  entire  period  has  been  connected  with  the  railroad 
company  with  which  he  is  now  holding  a  most  responsible  position.  He  was  born 
in  Bradford,  Illinois,  in  1875,  but  when  quite  young  he  was  brought  by  his  par- 
ents to  Iowa,  the  family  home  being  established  in  Marshalltown,  where  his 
youthful  days  were  spent  and  he  acquired  a  public-school  education.  He  then  took 
up  the  study  of  telegraphy  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Western  Union  Tele- 
graph Company,  acting  as  operator  at  Marshalltown  and  afterward  at  Mason 
City,  continuing  with  that  corporation  for  a  year  and  a  half.     He  next  entered 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  89 

the  service  of  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad  Company,  which  he 
represented  at  various  points  on  the  Iowa  and  Dakota  division.  Still  later  he 
was  with  the  Burlington,  Cedar  Rapids  &  Northern  Railroad  Company  and  next 
with  the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railroad  Company,  continuing  with  that  road 
for  a  number  of  years  at  various  places.  On  entering  the  employ  of  the  Waterloo, 
Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Company  he  was  made  assistant  general  freight 
agent  and  so  continued  for  a  period  but  in  1905  was  appointed  general  freight 
and  passenger  agent  and  has  remained  in  that  position  of  trust  and  responsi- 
bility for  nine  years.  He  is  well  known  in  railway  circles  throughout  the  northern 
Mississippi  valley  and  as  he  has  demonstrated  the  value  and  worth  of  his  service 
he  has  won  promotion  from  time  to  time. 

On  the  2ist  of  February,  1895,  Air.  Cheney  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  M.  Briggs,  of  Andrew  county,  Missouri,  and  they  are  now  the  parents 
of  a  daughter  and  son,  Margery  and  Eugene  M.  Mr.  Cheney  has  membership 
relations  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Since  coming  to  Water- 
loo he  has  entered  into  affiliation  with  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade, 
the  Town  Criers  Club,  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Waterloo  Club.  He 
stands  at  all  times  for  advancement  and  improvement  along  lines  contributing 
to  the  progress  and  upbuilding  of  city  and  county  and  his  cooperation  can  ever 
be  counted  upon  for  the  benefit  of  his  community,  for  he  is  a  most  public-spirited 
citizen.  At  the  same  time  he  never  neglects  a  business  duty  nor  obligation  and 
his  worth  is  attested  by  the  officials  of  the  railway  which  he  represents. 


WILLIAM  ROBERT  LAW. 

William  Robert  Law  is  an  active  member  of  the  bar  of  Black  Hawk  county, 
practicing  in  Waterloo,  where  he  is  also  well  known  as  a  progressive  and  public- 
spirited  citizen  who  in  public  office  has  proven  his  loyalty  to  the  welfare  of  the 
community.  One  of  the  native  sons  of  the  county,  he  was  born  in  Black  Hawk 
township  in  1880,  a  son  of  William  M.  Law,  also  of  Waterloo.  The  father  was 
born  in  Canada  and  arrived  in  this  county  in  1868.  He  took  up-  his  abode  upon 
a  farm  and  continued  to  engage  in  its  cultivation  until  he  was  appointed  to  the 
position  of  postmaster  at  Hudson  and  took  up  his  abode  in  that  town,  serving 
for  four  years  in  that  position.  He  then  entered  the  insurance  business,  in 
which  he  continued  until  he  was  elected  sheriff  of  Black  Hawk  county  in  1896. 
He  then  removed  to  Waterloo  and  entered  upon  the  duties  of  that  position,  which 
he  discharged  with  such  promptness,  capability  and  impartiality  that  he  was  re- 
elected and  continued  as  the  incumbent  for  eight  years  or  until  1904.  He  then 
retired  from  the  office  as  he  had  entered  it — with  the  confidence  and  good-will 
of  all  law-abiding  citizens — and  since  that  time  he  has  been  engaged  in  the  real- 
estate  business  in  Waterloo,  where  he  is  classed  with  the  representative  and 
valued  citizens.     His  wife,  Mrs.  Eliza  Jessie  Law,  is  deceased. 

William  Robert  Law  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Hudson  and  in  the  East 
Waterloo  high  school,  from  which  he  w^as  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class 
of  1899.  Deciding  upon  the  practice  of  law  as  a  life  work  he  began  studying 
in  the  University  of  Iowa  and  was  graduated  with  the  LL.  B.  degree  in  the  class 


90  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

of  1904.  He  then  practiced  law  independently  in  the  office  of  Boies  &  Boies 
until  January  i,  1906,  when  he  was  admitted  to  partnership  under  the  firm  style 
of  Boies  &  Law.  That  association  was  continued  until  January  i,  1909,  when 
Mr.  Law  was  appointed  postmaster  of  Waterloo  and  entered  upon  the  duties  of 
that  position,  which  he  occupied  for  four  years,  or  until  October,  191 3.  He  then 
resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession  and  is  accorded  a  good  clientage.  He  has 
a  wide  knowledge  of  the  principles  of  jurisprudence  and  recognizes  the  fact  that 
the  careful  preparation  of  cases  is  one  of  the  strongest  elements  of  success  and 
in  the  presentation  of  his  cause  is  strong,  forceful  and  logical.  He  is  also  a 
stockholder  and  director  of  the  Dairy  Cattle  Congress.  He  was  president  of  the 
Presidential  Postmasters  Association  of  Iowa  in  191 1,  a  fact  which  indicates  his 
high  standing  and  his  personal  popularity. 

In  1910  Mr.  Law  married  Miss  Makepeace  Morris,  of  Atlantic,  Iowa,  and 
they  have  become  the  parents  of  two  sons,  Robert  Morris  and  Franklin  Nichols. 
Mr.  Law  is  well  known  in  fraternal  relations,  holding  membership  in  the  Knights 
of  Pythias  lodge,  of  which  he  is  a  past  chancellor  commander,  and  the  Elks  lodge, 
in  which  he  is  a  past  exalted  ruler.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Commercial 
Club  and  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Waterloo  and  to  the  Town  Criers  Club.  He 
also  has  membership  in  the  local  bar  association.  His  social  qualities  render 
him  popular  and  he  is  widely  known  as  a  genial,  courteous  gentleman,  consid- 
erate and  kindly  as  well  as  firm  and  determined.  He  has  made  an  excellent 
record,  not  only  as  an  active  and  progressive  citizen,  but  also  in  the  line  of  his 
profession,  and  the  future  will  undoubtedly  hold  in  store  for  him  broader 
opportunities. 


CARLETON  SIAS. 


Carleton  Sias,  a  lawyer  and  banker  of  Waterloo,  came  to  Iowa  from  Rochester, 
New  York,  in  1903.  He  is  a  native  of  Monroe  county.  New  York,  being  a  son 
of  Daniel  B.  and  Lucy  B.  Sias ;  received  his  early  training  in  the  country  schools 
and  graduated  from  the  Rochester  high  school.  In  graduation  he  obtained  a 
scholarship  from  the  state  of  New  York,  on  competitive  examination,  to  Cornell 
University,  where  he  took  a  course  in  law,  graduating  with  the  class  of  1898  with 
the  degree  of  LL.  B.  After  spending  a  year  in  the  law  office  of  James  Breck 
Perkins,  the  well  known  French  historian,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  the 
state  of  New  York  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  and  practiced  in  Rochester  until 
1903,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo,  as  attorney  for  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  Trust 
Company,  later  becoming  secretary  of  the  company  and  in  191 1  a  director  and 
\  ice  president  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  Trust  Company,  and  also  of  the  Waterloo 
Savings  Bank,  with  which  institutions  he  has  been  identified  during  all  the  time 
he  has  lived  in  Iowa.  In  1914  he  formed  a  partnership  in  the  practice  of  law  with 
George  E.  Pike,  imder  the  name  of  Pike  &  Sias,  at  the  same  time  maintaining 
his  active  connection  with  the  trust  company  and  savings  bank. 

Mr.  Sias  has  been  identified  with  the  public  activities  of  Waterloo,  having 
been  for  years  a  member  and  secretary  of  the  library  board,  a  member  and 
for  several  years  president  of  the  school  board,   secretary  of  the  river   front 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  91 

improvement  commission,  treasurer  of  the  Black  Hawk  Comity  Bar  Asso- 
ciation and  a  member  of  the  Waterloo  Club.  He  has  also  been  actively  identified 
with  fraternal  and  social  organizations,  being  a  member  of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No. 
105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  having  held  all  of  the  chairs  in  Camp  No.  2059,  M.  W.  of  A., 
and  served  as  delegate  for  Black  Hawk  county  to  the  national  meeting  of  that 
organization  in  Chicago,  and  also  in  Buffalo,  New  York ;  being  a  member  of  the 
Yeomen ;  and  being  also  chancellor  commander  of  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  Knights 
of  Pythias.     He  has  moreover  been  president  of  the  Fortnightly  Club. 

In  191 1  when  Company  L,  Fifty-third  Regiment,  I.  N.  G.,  was  organized,  he 
was  elected  first  lieutenant  and  in  191 3  was  elected  captain  of  Company  L  to 
succeed  Captain  J.  H.  Hildebrand,  deceased. 

When  in  college  he  was  active  in  debating  matters,  being  speaker  of  the 
Cornell  Congress  and  a  member  of  the  Cornell  team  in  the  Cornell-Pennsylvania 
intercollegiate  debate. 

In  July,  1903.  Mr.  Sias  was  married  to  Miss  Jeanette  Payne,  of  Rochester, 
New  York,  and  they  have  two  sons,  Carleton  Payne  and  Erwin  Daniel. 


MICHAEL  H.  KELLY. 


Michael  H.  Kelly  is  the  efficient  postmaster  of  Waterloo,  to  which  position  he 
was  appointed  in  October,  1913.  He  had  previously  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
law  and  had  won  for  himself  a  creditable  position  at  the  bar  of  Black  Hawk 
county.  Wisconsin  numbers  him  among  her  native  sons,  his  birth  having  occurred 
at  New  Diggings  on  the  29th  of  May,  1871.  His  father,  John  D.  Kelly,  was  a 
native  of  County  Cork,  Ireland,  and  was  a  son  of  Daniel  Kelly,  who  spent  his 
entire  life  on  the  Emerald  isle.  John  D.  Kelly,  however,  came  to  the  United 
States  about  1848  with  his  widowed  mother,  two  brothers  and  three  sisters.  Of 
that  family  one  yet  survives,  Patrick  D.,  who  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  in 
1 87 1  and  now  engages  in  farming  the  land  which  he  purchased  in  1867.  He  is 
the  father  of  twelve  children,  one  of  whom,  Daniel  M.  Kelly,  is  now  (1914)  at- 
torney general  of  Montana.  For  a  considerable  period  John  D.  Kelly  followed 
mining,  working  at  that  occupation  in  Wisconsin,  while  in  later  life  he  turned  hi*^ 
attention  to  farming.  In  November,  1 881,  he  removed  to  Tama  county,  Iowa,  and 
in  1892  took  up  his  abode  in  Winnebago  county,  this  state.  He  died  in  January, 
1907,  having  for  about  three  years  survived  his  wife,  who  passed  away  in  May, 
1904.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Johanna  Lynch  and  was  a  native  of  Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Accompanying  his  parents  from  Wisconsin  to  Iowa  in  his  boyhood  days, 
Michael  H.  Kelly  continued  his  studies  in  the  high  school  of  Traer,  Tama  county, 
to  the  age  of  nineteen  years,  when  his  text-books  were  put  aside,  after  which  he 
divided  his  time  between  farming  and  school-teaching  in  Iowa.  He  taught  mostly 
in  Winnebago  county,  although  for  one  term  he  followed  that  profession  in  Black 
Hawk  county.  He  resolved,  however,  to  engage  in  other  professional  labor  and 
,began  the  study  of  law  in  the  office  and  under  the  direction  of  L.  O.  Hatch,  of 
Forest  City,  Iowa.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  October,  1898,  and  in  February, 
1900,  opened  a  law  office  in   Waterloo,   where  he  practiced  continuously  until 


92  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

October,  191 3,  when  he  was  appointed  to  his  present  position  as  postmaster.  In 
this  office  he  is  making  as  creditable  a  record  as  he  did  when  he  was  filHng  the 
position  of  city  attorney  of  Waterloo  from  March,  1910,  until  March,  1912.  In 
addition  to  his  other  interests  and  activities  he  is  a  director  of  the  Fraternal 
Bankers  Reserve  Insurance  Company  of  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa. 

On  the  8th  of  October,  1907,  at  Shell  Rock,  Iowa,  Mr.  Kelly  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Sadie  A.  Todd,  a  daughter  of  George  Todd,  deceased,  and  his 
wife,  Margaret  (  Gleason)  Todd.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kelly  have  one  child,  Eleanor  J., 
born  February  22,  191 1.  The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Catholic 
church  and  Mr.  Kelly  holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  also 
with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  while  his  political  allegiance  is 
given  to  the  democratic  party.  He  has  made  many  friends  during  his  residence 
in  Black  Hawk  county  and  is  now  numbered  among  the  leading  and  representative 
citizens  of  Waterloo. 


JOHN  C.  HARTMAN. 


John  C.  Hartman  was  born  in  Waterloo,  Iowa,  June  21,  1861,  the  son  of 
William  H.  and  Dorinda  Z.  (Clark)  Hartman.  During  the  progress  of  his 
early  education  in  the  schools  of  West  Waterloo  he  worked  in  the  Courier 
office,  performing  the  duties  which  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  printer's  apprentice  and 
acquiring  the  knowledge  of  the  newspaper  game  which  was  to  stand  him  in 
good  stead  later  in  life.  In  1878,  when  he  ended  his  school  life,  he  entered 
actively  into  the  newspaper  work  with  his  father  and  has  remained  untiT  the 
present  time  with  the  one  paper.  The  death  of  William  H.  Hartman  in  1895 
threw  the  editorial  responsibility  upon  John  C.  Hartman  and  he  became  the 
head  of  the  W.  H.  Hartman  Company,  a  position  which  he  occupies  at  the 
present  time. 

On  November  S,  1886,  Mr.  Hartman  was  married  to  Ida  M.  Hummel,  who 
was  born  in  Snyder  county,  Pennsylvania,  May  23.  i860.  Politically.  Mr. 
Hartman  has  followed  in  the  footsteps  of  his  father,  remaining  true  to  the 
republican  party.  Fraternally,  he  is  a  member  of  the  ]\lasonic  orders  of  the 
city,  also  the  Knights  of  Pythias. 


O.  J.  FULLERTON,  M.  D. 

It  would  be  difficult  to  determine  the  line  of  greatest  usefulness  in  the  life  of 
Dr.  O.  J.  Fullerton,  so  active  has  he  been  in  many  fields  of  labor  which  have  had 
a  direct  bearing  upon  the  welfare  and  progress  of  the  community.  He  estab- 
lished his  home  in  Waterloo  in  1884  and  through  the  intervening  period  has  en- 
gaged in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  the  conduct  of  business  affairs  of  im- 
portance, at  the  same  time  finding  opportunity  to  cooperate  in  many  movements 
which  have  been  elements  in  the  general  development  of  the  city  and  in  the  ad- 
vancement of  its  educational,   social   and  moral  welfare.     As   a   physician   and 


JOHN  C.  HARTMAN 


T\LUtN 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  95 

surgeon  he  enjoys  a  reputation  that  has  made  him  known  throughout  the  state 
and  his  standing  in  professional  circles  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  has  been 
honored  by  the  Iowa  Medical  Association  with  the  office  of  chairman  of  the 
surgical  section. 

Dr.  Fullerton  is  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  French 
Creek  valley,  near  Cambridge,  on  the  8th  of  March,  1849.  He  is  descended  in  the 
paternal  line  from  Scotch  ancestry  and  the  family  was  founded  in  America  by 
his  grandfather,  who  was  born  in  Glasgow  and  was  married  in  the  north  of  Ireland 
ere  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Pennsyl- 
vania. His  son,  David  L.  Fullerton,  father  of  Dr.  Fullerton,  was  born  in  the 
Keystone  state  and  as  the  years  passed  became  recognized  as  a  progressive  and 
prosperous  farmer  and  an  enterprising  business  man.  He  wedded  Elizabeth 
Stokes,  who  was  born  of  German  lineage. 

Their  son,  Dr.  Fullerton,  spent  his  youthful  days  upon  the  home  farm,  early 
assisting  in  the  tasks  of  plowing,  planting  and  harvesting  and  in  other  labors  inci- 
dent to  the  care  of  the  crops.  The  winter  months  were  devoted  to  the  acquire- 
ment of  a  district-school  education  and  thus  the  years  went  by  until  he  reached 
the  age  of  twenty.  He  began  preparation  for  a  professional  career  when,  in  1872, 
he  entered  upon  the  study  of  medicine  at  Miller,  Pennsylvania.  Five  years  later 
he  came  to  Iowa  and  entered  the  State  University  at  Iowa  City.  He  could  not  give 
his  undivided  time  to  his  college  course  because  of  the  necessity  of  providing  for 
his  own  support,  but  he  made  the  best  possible  use  of  his  opportunities  and  was 
graduated  with  the  class  of  1884.  Throughout  his  professional  career  he  has 
continually  advanced.  He  reads  broadly,  thinks  deeply  and  carries  his  investiga- 
tions far  and  wide  into  the  realms  of  medical  science.  He  went  abroad  for  further 
study  in  1891  and  pursued  a  special  course  in  the  University  of  Edinburgh,  Scot- 
land, and  at  Birmingham,  England.  In  the  meantime  he  had  located  for  practice 
in  Waterloo,  where  he  has  made  his  home  continuously  since  1884. 

In  1896,  Dr.  Fullerton  established  the  Fullerton  Electric  Cure  for  chronic  and 
long-standing  diseases  and  conducted  the  cure  until  1903,  when  he  resumed  the 
general  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  after  completing  a  post-graduate  course 
in  New  York  city.  As  he  has  continued  in  the  general  practice  of  medicine  he 
has  become  more  and  more  firmly  established  in  public  regard  as  an  able  physician 
and  surgeon  and  has  contributed  valuable  papers  to  the  literature  of  the  pro- 
fession, including  an  article  on  "Conservative  Surgery  of  the  Fingers,"  which 
appeared  in  the  Medical  Record  of  1886;  "Chloroform  Anaesthesia,"  read  before 
the  Austin  Flint  Medical  Society  in  1891  ;  his  "President's  Address,"  deHvered  be- 
fore the  Cedar  Valley  Medical  Society  in  1892;  and  his  "Surgical  Report,"  given 
in  the  transactions  of  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Society  in  1892.  The  above  indi- 
cates something  of  his  professional  connections  and  in  addition  he  is  a  member  of 
the  Tri-State  Medical  Society. 

As  the  years  have  gone  on  Dr.  Fullerton  has  prospered  as  the  result  of  his 
professional  skill,  his  business  ability,  his  wise  investments  and  judicious  manage- 
ment. He  became  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Security  Savings  Bank  of  Waterloo, 
of  which  he  was  a  director  for  a  number  of  years,  and  he  is  now  a  stockholder  in 
the  First  National  Bank.  He  has  become  heavily  interested  in  real  estate  and  is 
one  of  the  largest  tax  payers  of  the  city.     He  erected  the  Fullerton  Flats,  at  the 


96  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

corner  of  Fourth  and  Elm  streets,  and  from  this  property  derives  a  substantial 
annual  income. 

On  the  22d  of  December,  1869,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Dr.  Fullerton 
and  Miss  Mary  Isadore  Calkins,  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  born  January  6,  1849. 
She  was  but  fifty-three  years  of  age  when  she  passed  away  in  Waterloo,  November 
9,  1902,  her  death  being  deeply  regretted  by  her  many  friends  as  well  as  by  her 
immediate  family  because  of  her  many  lovable  traits  of  character  and  kindly  spirit. 
There  were  three  children  bom  of  that  marriage :  Martha  Inez,  now  the  wife  of 
Dr.  Theodore  B.  Askew,  a  specialist  in  diseases  of  the  eye,  ear,  nose  and  throat, 
practicing  at  San  Antonio,  Texas ;  Eda  Irene,  the  wife  of  Charles  H.  McWilliams, 
of  Los  Angeles,  California;  and  Corliss  Lee  Marne,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eleven 
years.  Ramona  McWilliams  is  the  Doctor's  only  grandchild.  In  1904,  Dr.  Fuller- 
ton  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Mrs.  Caroline  Mann,  of 
Waterloo,  who  by  her  former  marriage  had  two  children :  Charlotte  Mann,  who 
is  a  graduate  of  Mount  St.  Joseph  College  of  Dubuque  and  is  now  teaching  music ; 
and  Elizabeth  Mann,  who  will  graduate  from  the  same  school  with  the  class  of 
June,  191 5. 

Dr.  Fullerton  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  church  and  fraternally  is  a  Mason, 
having  membership  in  the  Knights  Templar  Commandery  and  in  the  Mystiv: 
Shrine.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  the  democratic  party  and  he  keeps  well 
versed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day.  His  public  spirit  has  been  again 
and  again  manifested  in  his  hearty  cooperation  with  movements  for  the  general 
good.  He  assisted  in  purchasing  Cedar  River  park  and  was  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Waterloo  Chautauqua  Association,  of  which  he  served  as  superintendent 
for  three  years  and  as  president  for  six  years.  He  is  a  most  generous  man,  giving 
with  an  open  hand  to  charitable  and  benevolent  projects.  He  has  never  regarded 
the  accumulation  of  wealth  as  the  sole  aim  of  his  life.  On  the  contrary,  as  he  has 
prospered  he  has  aided  freely  with  his  means  in  the  support  of  those  measures 
and  projects  which  tend  to  advance  the  interest  and  welfare  of  the  county  and 
city.  He  seems  to  readily  recognize  just  what  can  be  accomplished  for  the  benefit 
and  upbuilding  of  Waterloo  and  he  heartily  cooperates  in  every  movement  toward 
that  end.  The  same  sound  judgment  has  characterized  his  efforts  in  business  and 
professional  circles,  placing  him  in  the  enviable  position  which  he  now  occupies  as 
one  of  the  successful  residents  of  Black  Hawk  countv. 


JOHN  E.  WILLIAMS. 


In  the  year  1895  John  E.  Williams  became  a  member  of  the  bar  of  Black 
Hawk  county  and  has  since  been  in  active  practice  in  Waterloo.  But  the  borders 
of  the  county  do  not  limit  his  reputation,  for  he  is  widely  known  in  the  state  as 
an  able  and  successful  practitioner  in  the  courts.  He  was  born  in  Dane  county. 
Wisconsin,  in  1866.  his  parents  being  Benjamin  B.  and  Elizabeth  (Struble) 
Williams,  who  in  the  year  1869  became  residents  of  Grundy  county,  Iowa. 

John  E.  Williams  was  but  three  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  removal  of 
his  parents  to  this  state  and  in  the  schools  of  Grundy  county  he  pursued  his 
education   until   graduated    from   the   high   school  of   Reinbeck.      He  afterward 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  97 

entered  Iowa  State  University,  becoming  a  student  in  the  law  department,  in 
which  he  pursued  the  regular  course  until  graduated  with  the  LL.B.  degree  in 
1889.  The  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  opened  an  office  in  Rein- 
beck,  where  he  continued  in  active  practice  for  five  years,  or  until  1895,  when  he 
came  to  the  growing  city  of  Waterloo.  Here  he  was  first  associated  with  the 
law  firm  of  Williams  &  Kern  for  two  years  and  afterward  practiced  alone  for 
three  years.  He  then  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Miller  &  Williams,  which 
connection  was  continued  for  four  years.  That  relationship  was  then  dissolved 
and  Mr.  Williams  was  once  more  alone  until  January,  1912,  when  he  became 
senior  partner  in  the  present  firm  of  Williams  &  Clark.  He  engages  in  the 
general  practice  of  law  in  all  of  the  courts  of  the  state  and  in  the  federal  courts 
and  is  a  well  known  and  representative  member  gf  the  Black  Hawk  County  and 
the  Iowa  State  Bar  Associations.  His  ability  is  pronounced  and  an  excellent 
presence,  an  earnest  manner,  marked  strength  of  character,  a  thorough  grasp  of 
the  law  and  the  ability  to  accurately  apply  its  principles  make  him  an  eft'ective 
and  successful  advocate  and  insure  him  rank  among  the  prominent  members  of 
the  profession  in  Black  Hawk  county.  He  served  for  one  term  as  county 
attorney  when  in  Grundy  county  and  for  eight  years  has  been  city  attorney  of 
Waterloo,  making  a  most  creditable  record  in  both  offices. 

In  1 89 1  Mr.  Williams  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Maud  G.  Thompson, 
of  Grundy  county,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  four  children,  Grace, 
John  E.,  Jr.,  Harry  G.  and  Marion  Elizabeth.  Mr.  Williams  is  a  Royal  Arch 
Mason  and  also  holds  membership  in  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks 
and  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  belongs  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  Waterloo  Club.  Almost  his  entire  life  has  been  spent  in  this  state,  his  resi- 
dence in  Iowa  covering  a  period  of  forty-five  years.  In  his  relation  to  public 
affairs  he  stands  at  all  times  for  progress,  improvement  and  advancement  and 
has  lent  his  aid  and  influence  to  many  measures  for  the  general  good. 


JOHN  T.  BURKETT. 


John  T.  Burkett  is  one  of  Waterloo's  leading  architects,  as  evidenced  in  the 
large  number  of  fine  buildings  which  he  has  erected  in  this  city.  He  has  accurate 
and  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  broad,  scientific  principles  underlying  his 
profession  and  is  as  well  thoroughly  acquainted  with  every  practical  phase  of 
the  business.  He  was  born  in  Armstrong  county,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  23d  of 
February,  1849,  a  son  of  David  S.  and  Delilah  (Townsend)  Burkett,  both  of 
whom  died  during  the  early  childhood  of  their  son,  who  was  then  reared  to 
manhood  by  his  maternal  grandfather,  Isaac  Townsend,  on  the  farm  where  the 
Vandergrift  sheet  steel  mills  now  stand. 

John  T.  Burkett  was  educated  in  the  district  schools  and  was  early  bound 
out  to  the  wheelwright's  trade,  serving  a  four  years'  apprenticeship,  after  which 
he  took  a  course  in  drafting  in  the  old  Iron  City  College  of  Pittsburgh.  When 
he  had  finished  his  studies  in  that  institution  he  came  to  the  middle  west,  in 
1869.  his  intention  being  to  go  on  through  to  the  coast,  but,  having  friends  in 
Waterloo  and  Independence,  he  stopped  off  in  Iowa  for  a  visit.    At  that  time  the 


98  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

work  of  building  the  Independence  Mill  was  just  begun.  This  was  a  big  mill 
for  those  days,  sixty-five  by  one  hundred  and  twelve  feet,  four  stories  in  height 
and  built  of  brick.  Mr.  Burkett  was  persuaded  to  remain  and  become  one  of  the 
building  force  and  for  three  years  his  knowledge  of  the  millwright's  trade  con- 
tributed to  the  erection  of  one  of  the  best  mills  in  the  west.  Subsequently  he 
became  identified  with  the  Cedar  Valley  Manufacturing  Company,  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  sashes,  doors  and  blinds,  and  was  connected  therewith  for 
sixteen  or  seventeen  years.  This  company  was  organized  by  Mr.  Burkett  and 
Stephen  Salisbury  and  subsequently  they  established  a  bank  and  store  fixture 
department  of  the  business,  which  became  a  most  important  feature  of  their 
industry.  They  conducted  their  interests  with  growing  success  until  about  1902, 
when  they  sold  out  to  the  Nauman  Company,  since  which  time  Mr.  Burkett  has 
given  his  entire  attention  to  general  architectural  work,  maintaining  an  otifice  in 
the  Lafayette  building.  Among  the  principal  buildings  which  he  has  erected 
are  the  Columbia  block,  the  Gasser  buildings,  three  in  number,  the  Waterloo 
Fruit  &  Commission  Company  building,  the  Fowler  \Miolesale  Grocery  house, 
the  city  hall,  the  Parsons  building,  the  Julian  flats,  the  Eddy  block,  the  Brevort 
Hotel,  the  Martin  Hotel  and  the  residence  of  George  Miller.  Many  of  the 
earlier  store  buildings  on  Fourth  street  were  also  designed  and  built  by  him. 

In  1873  ^Ir.  Burkett  was  united  in  marriage  to  J\Iiss  Justine  H.  Wattells,  of 
Independence,  Iowa,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children,  ijoth,  however, 
now  deceased.  Mr.  Burkett  is  a  member  of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A,  F.  & 
A.  M.;  Tabernacle  Chapter,  No.  52,  R.  A.  M. ;  Ascalon  Commandery,  No.  25, 
K.  T. ;  and  El  Kahir  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S..  of  Cedar  Rapids.  He  likewise 
holds  membership  in  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club 
and  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  representative  business  men  of  the  city.  Since 
the  time  when  he  entered  upon  his  apprenticeship  in  the  east,  industry  has  been 
his  watchword  and  indefatigable  industry  has  enabled  him  to  wrest  success  from 
the  hands  of  fate.  Obstacles  and  difliculties  have  been  overcome  by  persistent, 
determined  efifort  and  through  the  faithful  performance  of  each  day's  duties  he 
has  found  encouragement  and  inspiration  for  the  labors  of  the  following  day 
Thus  he  has  gone  on  from  one  thing  to  another  of  greater  importance  and  his 
eiTorts  have  been  crowned  with  a  gratifying  measure  of  prosperity. 


CHARLES  M.  VAN  VLECK. 

This  is  an  age  of  systemization.  Not  only  individual  interests  are  carefully 
systematized,  but  all  public  afifairs,  because  of  a  recognition  of  the  greater  effi- 
ciency and  force  obtained  thereby.  There  is  no  city  of  any  importance  which 
does  not  today  have  a  commercial  club  formed  of  the  leading  business  men  in  an 
organized  eiTort  to  promote  the  business  interests  and  uphold  the  civic  welfare 
of  the  community.  Charles  M.  Van  Vleck  is  today  secretary  of  the  Commercial 
Club  and  Board  of  Trade  of  W'aterloo  and  in  this  connection  is  doing  most 
splendid  work  to  further  the  welfare  of  his  city.  He  is  a  young  man  full  of 
energy,  determination,  ambition  and  resourcefulness.  He  was  born  in  Waterloo 
in  1888,  a  son  of  Lawrence  Van  Vleck  of  this  city,  whose  birth  occurred  in  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  99 

state  of  New  York.  He  came  when  a  young  man  to  Waterloo  about  thirty  years 
ago  and  for  twenty-six  years  was  connected  with  the  IlHnois  Central  Railroad 
Company  but  is  now  living  retired.  Not  only  has  he  been  active  in  business  but 
also  in  public  affairs  and  for  several  years  was  deputy  labor  commissioner  of 
Iowa.     He  was  married  in  Waterloo  to  Miss  Mary  Heyer,  of  this  city. 

Their  son,  Charles  M.  Van  Vleck,  spending  his  youthful  days  under  the 
parental  roof,  attended  the  public  schools  and  was  graduated  from  the  East 
Waterloo  high  school  with  the  class  of  1906.  He  afterward  entered  the  National 
Law  School  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  won  his  LL.B.  degree  upon  graduation 
with  the  class  of  1910.  During  the  time  that  he  was  pursuing  his  law  studies  he 
was  also  in  the  employ  of  the  government  in  connection  with  the  Interstate  Com- 
merce Commission  and  thus  provided  for  the  expenses  of  his  law  course.  Fol- 
lowing his  graduation  he  returned  to  Waterloo  and  became  connected  with  the 
Waterloo  Reporter,  remaining  on  that  paper  for  three  years,  at  the  end  of  which 
time  he  accepted  his  present  position  as  secretary  of  the  Commercial  Club  and 
Board  of  Trade.  He  thoroughly  understands  the  purposes  of  his  work  and  his 
efforts  to  exploit  Waterloo's  advantages  and  opportunities  have  been  far-reaching 
and  beneficial. 

On  the  4th  of  June,  191 3,  Mr.  V^an  Vleck  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Lula  Mahanke,  of  Parkersburg,  Iowa,  and  they  have  one  son,  Robert  Charles. 
The  parents  are  members  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church  of  Waterloo  and  Mr. 
Van  Vleck  also  holds  membership  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks 
and  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  which  he  is  the  junior  warden. 
He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Club  and  is  prominent  and  popular 
in  the  social  and  business  circles  of  his  city.  Alert  and  energetic,  he  is  an  ex- 
ponent of  the  spirit  of  the  age  and  typifies  in  his  life  that  enterprise  which  has 
been  the  dominant  factor  in  the  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country. 


J.  E.  JOHNSON. 


The  number  of  productive  industries  which  have  sprung  up  in  Waterloo  in 
the  last  two  or  three  decades  has  largely  been  the  means  of  bringing  about  the 
city's  rapid  and  substantial  growth,  whereby  it  has  become  one  of  the  metropoli- 
tan centers  of  the  state.  In  this  connection  J.  E.  Johnson  is  well  known  as  the 
secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Waterloo  Gasoline  Engine  Company.  For  four- 
teen years  he  has  here  resided  and  not  only  has  he  won  a  merited  reputation  in 
business  circles  but  has  also  become  a  recognized  factor  in  advancing  the  public 
good  through  his  indorsement  and  support  of  many  valuable  civic  measures. 

A  native  of  Nebraska,  Mr.  Johnson  was  born  in  Omaha  in  1864  and  spent 
the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  there.  He  supplemented  a  public-school 
course  by  study  in  Cornell  College  of  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  He  afterward  entered  Boston 
University  and  there  won  the  S.  T.  D.  degree,  after  which  he  had  a  year  of 
special  study  in  sociology  in  Harvard  University.  Lie  also  received  the  honorary 
degree  of  D.  D.  from  Cornell  College  in  June,  1914.  He  has  been  a  minister 
in  the  regular  service  of  the  church  since  1892.    His  first  charge  was  at  Brockton, 


H^ 


704487 


100  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

]\Iassacliusetts,  after  which  he  was  called  to  Xiantic,  Connecticut.  He  tlien 
accepted  the  pastorate  of  the  First  Methodist  Episcopal  church  of  this  city  and 
yet  gives  much  time  and  earnest  thought  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  cause  of 
Christianity.  Fie  entered  industrial  circles  when,  in  November,  1907,  he  became 
connected  with  the  Waterloo  Gasoline  Engine  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  the 
secretary  and  treasurer.  He  thus  has  voice  in  its  management  and  control  and 
his  practical  opinions  are  a  valuable  asset. 

In  1895  Mr.  Johnson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Martha  Cadwallader, 
a  daughter  of  Chester  Cadwallader,  of  Waterloo,  and  to  them  have  been  born 
two  sons  and  a  daughter,  Harold  E.,  Paul  E.  and  Alargaret  E.  Mr.  Johnson  is  a 
member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  is  in  hearty  sympathy  with  the  beneficent 
purpose  of  the  craft.  His  deep  interest  in  the  cause  of  education  is  manifest  in 
the  fact  that  he  is  serving  on  the  board  of  trustees  of  Cornell  College  and  his 
humanitarian  spirit  finds  expression  in  his  service  as  a  member  of  the  board  of 
directors  of  the  Associated  Charities.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Town  Criers 
Club,  an  organization  for  the  upbuilding  of  the  city  and  the  extension  of  its 
Imsiness  connections.  He  is  one  of  the  leading  residents  of  W^aterloo,  active 
in  all  projects  for  the  betterment  and  advancement  of  the  city  along  material, 
intellectual,  social  and  moral  lines.  He  has  a  hand  constantly  outreaching  to  aid 
his  fellow  travelers  on  life's  journey ;  he  is  generous  to  the  needy,  sympathetic 
to  those  in  distress  and  is  constantly  teaching  by  example  as  well  as  precept 
those  views  of  life  which  recognize  the  opportunities  of  the  individual  and  his 
duties  and  obligations  toward  his  fellowmen. 


VELLAS  L.  SIMMONS. 

\  ellas  L.  Simmons  is  now  the  oldest  photographer  in  Waterloo  in  years  of 
continuous  connection  with  the  business.  He  is  accorded  a  liberal  patronage  and 
he  employs  the  latest  improved  processes  and  methods  in  photographic  portraiture. 
He  was  born  in  Baldwinsville,  New  York,  January  i,  1855,  a  son  of  Leonard  j. 
and  Cordelia  (Bishop)  Simmons,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  state  of 
New  York.  The  father  was  always  a  farmer  and  stockman  and  in  the  year  1857 
came  wuth  his  family  to  the  middle  west,  settling  at  Nora,  Jo  Daviess  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  his  death  about  the  year  1892.  The 
mother  continued  to  make  her  home  in  Jo  Daviess  county  until  1908,  and  then 
came  to  Waterloo  to  live  with  her  son,  Amelias  L.,  with  whom  she  continued  until 
she  was  called  to  her  final  rest  on  the  20th  of  May,  1914. 

Vellas  L.  Simmons  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  four  chil- 
dren and  was  only  two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  removal  of  the  family  to 
Illinois.  He  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  country  schools  of  Jo  Daviess 
county  and  afterward  attended  high  school  at  Warren,  Illinois.  When  eighteen 
years  of  age  he  took  up  the  study  of  photography  and  almost  immediately  began 
earning  a  salary.  He  was  connected  with  a  photographic  studio  at  Lena,  Illinois, 
where  he  remained  for  five  years  and  at  the  end  of  that  time  went  to  West 
Liberty,  Iowa,  where  he  conducted  a  studio  for  a  year.  He  then  returned  to 
Illinois,  settling  at  Mendota,  where  he  was  employed  in  the  line  of  his  chosen 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  101 

vocation  until  1883,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  purchased  the  business  of 
J.  P.  King.  He  has  since  maintained  his  studio  here  and  is  now  the  oldest 
photographer  in  Waterloo  in  years  of  continuous  connection  with  the  business 
in  this  city.  He  devotes  his  entire  time  to  the  photographic  art  and  his  wife, 
who  is  also  an  experienced  photographer,  always  assists  him. 

It  was  on  the  loth  of  August,  1880,  that  Mr.  Simmons  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Emma  J.  Letteer,  who  was  born  in  Proctorville,  Pennsylvania,  a  daughter 
of  Sidney  and  Sarah  (Wilson)  Letteer,  who  were  likewise  natives  of  the  Key- 
stone state.  The  father  there  learned  the  tailor's  trade  in  early  life  and  followed 
that  pursuit  for  many  years.  He  was  born  in  1813  and  his  death  occurred  in 
1888,  while  his  wife,  who  was  born  in  181 5,  passed  away  in  1890.  They  came  to 
the  west  in  1866,  settling  first  at  Sublette,  Illinois,  and  in  1883  they  arrived  in 
Waterloo,  where  their  remaining  days  were  passed.  In  this  city  the  father  lived 
retired  from  business,  nor  did  he  ever  aspire  to  public  office.  He  and  his  wife 
enjoyed  the  confidence  and  good-will  of  all  who  knew  them  and  their  circle  of 
friends  was  an  extensive  one.  Mrs.  Simmons  was  the  seventh  in  order  of  birth 
in  a  family  of  eight  children  and  by  her  marriage  has  become  the  mother  of  two 
children.  Charles  W  is  a  printer  who  is  engaged  in  business  under  the  name  of 
the  Stuart  Simmons  Press  at  West  Waterloo.  He  married  Miss  Cherry  Colby, 
who  was  born  in  W^aterloo,  and  they  have  two  children,  Charles  V.  and  LeRoy. 
The  daughter,  Eva  May,  is  the  widow  of  Albert  J.  Abrams,  who  was  formerly  a 
resident  of  Dallas,  Texas.  He  died  April  30.  1914,  and  his  widow,  with  their 
daughter,  Eva  Lulu,  is  now  residing  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Simmons. 

Mr.  Simmons  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  republican  party  but  is  without  aspiration  for  office.  He  be- 
longs to  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  to  the  Mystic  Toilers  and  the 
Bankers  Life  Association  of  Des  Moines.  He  is  well  known  in  this  city,  where 
he  has  resided  for  almost  a  third  of  a  century.  He  does  excellent  work  in 
photographic  portraiture  but  makes  a  special  feature  of  commercial  work  and 
the  walls  of  his  studio  are  adorned  with  various  fine  specimens  of  his  skill  in 
this  connection. 


FRED  W.  POWERS,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Fred  \\'.  Powers,  in  former  years  actively,  successfully  and  extensively 
engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  has  now  retired  from  that 
professional  field  and  devotes  his  energies  to  financial  afTairs  as  president  of 
the  Black  Hawk  National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  one  of  the  largest  and  most  im- 
portant moneyed  institutions  of  the  city.  He  was  born  in  Benton  county,  Iowa. 
in  1868,  and  supplemented  his  public-school  education  by  study  at  Cornell  Col- 
lege of  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa,  thus  gaining  a  broad  literary  learning  to  serve  as 
a  foundation  upon  which  to  build  the  superstructure  of  his  professional  training. 
Thinking  to  make  the  practice  of  medicine  a  life  work,  he  entered  the  Univer- 
sity of  Iowa  and  completed  a  course  in  its  medical  department  with  the  class  of 
1889.  For  twenty  years  he  was  one  of  the  leading  practitioners  of  Grundy  and 
Black  Hawk  counties,  spending  thirteen  years  in  Reinbeck  and  seven  years  in 


102  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Waterloo.  His  prominence  in  his  profession  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he 
served  as  president  of  the  Iowa  state  board  of  health  and  of  the  Iowa  state  board 
of  medical  examiners.  He  kept  in  close  touch  with  the  progress  of  his  profession 
while  in  active  practice,  was  most  careful  in  the  diagnosis  of  his  cases  and  was 
seldom  if  ever  at  fault  in  foretelling  the  outcome  of  disease. 

Dr.  Powers  performed  his  duties  with  a  sense  of  conscientious  obligation, 
but  in  1909  he  retired  from  the  active  practice  of  medicine  to  become  active  vice 
president  of  the  Black  Hawk  National  Bank,  of  which  he  is  now  the  president. 
As  chief  executive  officer  he  carefully  directs  the  interests  of  the  institution, 
ever  recognizing  the  fact  that  that  bank  is  most  worthy  of  patronage  which  most 
carefully  safeguards  the  interests  of  its  depositors.  His  progressiveness  is 
tempered  by  conservatism  and  the  even  balance  maintained  constitutes  a  potent 
force  in  the  growing  success  of  the  bank,  which  is  today  one  of  the  largest 
financial  institutions  of  Waterloo.  It  was  organized  in  1903  and  from  the  be- 
ginning has  enjoyed  a  successful  existence.  Dr.  Powers  is  also  vice  president 
of  the  Rice  Savings  Bank  of  Smithland,  Iowa,  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  board 
of  directors  of  the  Iowa  Life  Insurance  Company  and  its  medical  director. 

In  1889  occurred  the  marriage  of  Dr.  Powers  and  Miss  Pearl  E.  Thompson, 
of  Reinbeck,  by  whom  he  has  three  children,  Gladys  Beulah.  Evangeline  and 
Fanchon  Winifred.  At  the  time  of  the  Spanish- American  war  Dr.  Powers  was 
commissioned  colonel  by  Governor  Shaw  for  medical  service  at  Jacksonville. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Waterloo  lodge  of  the  Elks,  also  the  Knights  of  Pythias, 
the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Waterloo  Club,  the  Town  Criers  Club  and  the 
Country  and  Golf  Club.  He  still  retains  his  membership  in  the  medical  societies 
and  his  interest  in  sanitary  and  public  health  affairs.  His  acquaintance  is  wide 
and  favorable.  Sociability  and  unfeigned  cordiality  have  made  him  popular 
among  those  with  whom  he  has  come  in  contact  and  ability  has  placed  him  in  the 
front  rank  among  the  representative  citizens  of  Waterloo.  He  has  gained  suc- 
cess, yet  it  alone  has  not  been  the  goal  for  which  he  has  striven,  for  he  belongs 
to  that  class  of  representative  American  citizens  who  promote  the  general  pros- 
perity while  advancing  individual  interests. 


FRED  S.  PETTIT. 


Fred  S.  Pettit,  who  is  ably  filling  the  responsible  position  of  clerk  of  the  district 
court  of  Black  Hawk  county,  entered  upon  the  duties  of  that  ofifice  on  the  ist  of 
April,  1912,  having  been  appointed  to  fill  out  an  unexpired  term,  and  at  the 
November  election  of  the  same  year  he  was  chosen  by  popular  suffrage  to  fill 
the  ofifice  for  a  term  of  two  years  and  was  again  chosen  in  November,  1914,  when 
he  polled  the  largest  vote  of  the  election.  Those  who  have  watched  his  course  in 
office  speak  of  him  in  terms  of  high  commendation. 

Mr.  Pettit  is  a  native  of  Long  Island,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Flushing 
on  the  31st  of  July,  1875,  his  parents  being  Gold  S.  and  Julia  A^  (Weeks)  Pettit, 
who  came  to  Iowa  when  their  son  Fred  was  a  boy,  settling  at  Cedar  Rapids.  In 
that  city  Fred  S.  Pettit  was  reared  and  educated,  mastering  the  branches  of 
learning  taught  in  the  public  schools.    In  the  spring  of  1903  he  arrived  in  Waterloo 


FKED  S.  PETTJT 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  105 

and  on  the  ist  of  May,  1904,  he  became  deputy  clerk  of  the  district  court,  re- 
maining in  that  position  until  he  was  appointed  clerk  of  the  court,  as  previously 
mentioned,  his  experience  as  deputy  well  qualifying  him  for  the  onerous  duties 
which  devolved  upon  him  in  his  promotion.  He  has  always  been  prominently 
identified  with  the  republican  party  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of 
franchise  and  he  does  everything  in  his  power  to  legitimately  promote  its  growth 
and  insure  its  success,  for  he  believes  firmly  in  its  principles  as  factors  in  good 
government. 

Aside  from  politics  Mr.  Pettit  is  deeply  interested  in  the  welfare  of  his  city 
and  puts  forth  effective  effort  for  advancing  its  interests,  being  an  active  member 
of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Waterloo.  He  was  chair- 
man of  the  committee  appointed  by  the  Commercial  Club  and  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce to  participate  in  the  opening  of  the  Russell-Lamson  Hotel,  the  finest  hotel 
in  the  state  of  Iowa,  and  he  has  been  actively  connected  with  many  projects  which 
have  had  to  do  with  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  city  and  with  the  promotion 
of  its  civic  standards. 

On  the  6th  of  November,  1901,  Mr.  Pettit  was  married  to  Miss  Josephine 
Buchanan,  of  Cedar  Rapids,  and  they  have  one  child,  Saxton  B.  The  parents  are 
members  of  the  Westminster  Presbyterian  church,  are  active  workers  in  its  behalf 
and  generous  in  its  support.  Along  more  strictly  social  and  fraternal  lines  his 
connections  are  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  with  the  Town  Criers  Club. 
Through  the  eleven  years  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo  he  has  become  widely  and 
favorably  known  and  today  numbers  many  of  the  best  citizens  among  his  warm 
friends. 


C.  H.  NAUMAN. 


Success  is  not  a  matter  of  genius,  as  held  by  some,  but  is  rather  the  outcome 
of  clear  judgment,  experience  and  indefatigable  energy — a  fact  which  has  been 
again  and  again  demonstrated  in  the  lives  of  prosperous  men,  men  who  have 
risen  from  humble  positions  in  the  business  world  to  places  of  prominence  and 
prosperity.  Such  has  been  the  record  of  C.  H.  Nauman,  president  of  the  Nauman 
Company  of  Waterloo,  manufacturers  of  bank  and  store  fixtures,  sashes,  doors 
and  house  trimmings.  He  is  a  man  of  well  balanced  business  capacities  and 
powers,  capable  of  mature  judgment  concerning  his  opportunities  and  those 
things  which  go  to  make  up  life's  contacts  and  experiences. 

Mr.  Nauman  was  born  in  Waterloo  in  1862,  pursued  his  education  in  the 
schools  of  this  city  and  also  took  a  commercial  course  at  Dubuque.  He  was  but 
two  years  of  age  when,  in  1864,  his  father,  Henry  Nauman,  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  George  P.  Beck  under  the  firm  style  of  Beck  &  Nauman  and  established 
the  business  which  is  now  being  conducted  by  the  corporation  of  which  C.  H. 
Nauman  is  the  president.  It  was  in  1856  that  the  father  came  to  Waterloo,  at 
which  period  there  were  no  railroads  in  the  town.  He  had  to  haul  all  the 
material  used  in  the  building  of  his  house  from  Dubuque.  In  the  years  which 
followed  he  became  more  and  more  actively  and  prominently  connected  with 
the  business  interests  of  his  adopted  city.     The  firm  which  was  established  in 


V'Ol.  II— 6 


106  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

1864  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  sashes,  doors  and  mill  work,  and  from  his 
youth  C.  H.  Nauman  was  in  the  shops  and  became  familiar  with  every  branch 
of  the  business,  both  in  principle  and  detail.  He  completed  his  course  in  com- 
mercial college  when  about  twenty-one  years  of  age.  At  about  the  same  time 
the  foreman  of  the  mill  gave  up  his  position,  after  which  C.  H.  Nauman,  to- 
gether with  the  pattern  maker,  had  charge  of  the  work.  During  that  winter 
they  got  out  all  of  the  material  for  the  Irving  House  and  when  that  task  was 
accomplished  the  firm  retained  C.  H.  Nauman  as  its  foreman.  Pie  has  con- 
tinuously been  identified  with  the  business  and  its  development  since  that  day. 

The  papers  of  incorporation  were  taken  out  about  1886  or  1887  under  the 
style  of  the  Daniel  &  Nauman  Company.  Following  the  death  of  Mr.  Daniel 
some  time  later  the  firm  name  was  changed  to  the  Beck,  Nauman  &  Watts  Com- 
pany and  in  1899  ^he  Nauman  brothers  purchased  the  interests  of  all  the  other 
stockholders  and  the  style  was  changed  to  the  Nauman  Company,  of  which  the 
officers  are :  C.  H.  Nauman,  president ;  and  G.  W.  Nauman,  treasurer.  They 
have  a  large  plant,  which  includes  buildings  on  all  four  corners  of  Cedar  street 
and  Park  avenue.  They  manufacture  drug,  bank  and  store  fixtures,  sashes  and 
doors  and  all  kinds  of  house  trimmings  and  they  employ  an  average  of  eighty 
men.  Their  output,  which  is  now  extensive,  is  widely  shipped  and  the  business 
is  today  one  of  the  foremost  productive  industries  of  the  city.  Mr.  Nauman  is 
active  in  its  management  and  control  and  has  formulated  many  of  the  plans  that 
have  been  carried  forward  to  successful  completion  for  the  enlargement  and- 
substantial  development  of  the  business. 

On  the  1st  of  August,  1889,  Mr.  Nauman  was  married  to  Miss  Katie  A'efth, 
of  Waterloo,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  two  daughters,  Helen  and  Marie. 
Mr.  Nauman  is  a  member  of  Helmet  Lodge,  K.  P.,  of  Waterloo,  and  is  well 
known  and  popular  in  that  organization.  Fie  cooperates  in  many  movements 
for  the  public  good,  but  his  business  interests  claim  the  greater  part  of  his  time 
and  attention,  and  he  has  been  an  active  factor  in  promoting  one  of  the  oldest 
and  most  substantial  manufacturing  plants  of  the  city. 


G.  W.  NAUMAN. 


G.  W.  Nauman  is  the  treasurer  of  the  Nauman  Company,  which  owns  and 
controls  the  oldest  manufacturing  plant  of  Waterloo — a  business  devoted  to  the 
manufacture  of  store  and  bank  fixtures,  sashes  and  doors.  Mr.  Nauman  was 
born  in  Waterloo  in  1869  and  his  youthful  experiences  were  such  as  usually  fall 
to  the  lot  of  the  lad  who  divides  his  time  between  the  work  of  the  schoolroom, 
the  pleasures  of  the  playground  and  such  duties  as  are  assigned  him  by  parental 
authority.  Flis  father  had  embarked  in  business  in  Waterloo  in  1864  and  founded 
the  enterprise  which  is  now  conducted  under  the  name  of  the  Nauman  Com- 
pany. From  early  youth  G.  W.  Nauman  has  been  associated  with  the  under- 
taking and  as  the  years  have  gone  on  has  become  more  and  more  active  in  its 
management  and  control.  Eventually  the  interests  of  the  house  were  taken  over 
by  the  present  proprietors,  who  have  continued  the  business  under  the  name  of 
the    Nauman   Company.     The  plant   is  well  equipped  with  the  latest   improved 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  107 

niachintry  and  there  is  every  facility  to  promote  the  work  and  add  to  the  excel- 
lence of  the  quality. 

In  1895  Mr.  Nauman  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Wilda  Holman,  of 
Waterloo,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Josephine.  Mr.  Nauman  has  membership 
with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  in  Masonry  has  advanced  in 
the  York  Rite  to  the  rank  of  Knight  Templar  in  the  command.ery.  In  business 
connections  he  enjoys  a  most  enviable  reputation.  He  has  been  trained  insist- 
ently and  carefully  in  the  business  with  which  he  is  connected  and  knows 
thoroughly  every  phase  thereof.  He  has  studied  closely  its  opportunities  and 
Ijy  straightforward  methods  has  increased  its  patronage.  Energy  and  determina- 
tion have  been  the  salient  features  in  his  advancement  and  his  course  is  one 
which  may  well  be  followed  by  others. 


FRANK  T.  BENTLEY. 


In  a  record  of  the  representative  residents  of  Black  Hawk  county  it  is  im- 
perative that  mention  be  made  of  Frank  T.  Bentley,  who  for  three  terms  or  six 
years  has  filled  the  position  of  county  treasurer  and  at  fhe  same  time  is  well 
known  in  business  circles  as  manager  of  the  Bentley  Brothers  Bond  &  Insurance 
Company.  He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose,  carrying  forward  to  successful 
completion  whatever  he  undertakes,  and  at  all  times  his  actions  have  measured 
up  to  high  standards  of  manhood  and  citizenship. 

Mr.  Bentley  was  born  in  Belmont  county,  Ohio,  in  1871  and  through  the 
period  of  his  youth  was  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools  there.  On  the  ist  of  Janu- 
.ary,  1894,  he  arrived  in  Waterloo  and  soon  afterward  became  connected  with 
the  United  States  Express  Company,  which  he  represented  for  five  years.  On 
the  expiration  of  that  period  he  was  called  to  public  office,  having  been  appointed 
deputy  county  recorder,  in  which  position  he  remained  for  one  year.  He  after- 
ward spent  nine  years  in  the  position  of  deputy  treasurer  and  at  the  end  of  that 
time  was  elected  treasurer.  That  he  proved  capable  was  but  the  logical  result 
of  his  previous  training  in  the  office  and  that  he  has  been  twice  reelected  was  but 
natural  owing  to  the  promptness  and  capability  with  which  he  has  discharged 
his  duties.  Abraham  Lincoln  once  said:  "You  can  fool  all  of  the  people  some  of 
the  time  and  some  of  the  people  all  of  the  time,  but  you  cannot  fool  all  of  the 
people  all  of  the  time,"  "and  when  a  man  is  again  and  again  chosen  for  office  it  is 
a  self-evident  fact  that  he  is  a  man  of  worth  and  that  his  worth  is  widely  recog- 
nized. This  is  certainly  indicated  in  Mr.  Bentley's  fifteen  years'  connection  with 
the  office  of  county  treasurer.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  a  stalwart  repub- 
lican, earnest  and  unfaltering  in  his  svipport  of  the  party,  and  as  the  years  have 
gone  on  his  influence  has  been  felt  as  a  potent  force  in  attaining  republican 
successes. 

An  equally  creditable  record  has  been  made  by  Mr.  Bentley  in  his  business 
connections.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Bentley  Brothers  Bond  &  Insurance  Com- 
])any,  of  which  he  is  the  manager,  and  he  is  also  one  of  the  directors  of  the 
Perpetual  Building  &  Loan  Association. 

In  January,  1895,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Bentley  and  Miss 
Lottie  M.  Jackson,  a  native  of  Ohio,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  two 


108  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

daughters,  Lucile  K.  and  Eleanor  T.  The  family  attend  the  First  Presbyterian 
church,  of  which  Mr.  Bentley  is  an  earnest  and  devoted  member.  He  is  serving 
as  a  member  of  the  session  and  cooperates  in  movements  which  lead  to  the  up- 
building of  the  church  and  the  extension  of  its  power  and  influence.  He  belongs 
also  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  Board  of  Trade  and  seeks  the  welfare 
and  upbuilding  of  the  city,  its  improvement  along  various  lines  and  the  upbuild- 
ing of  its  civic  standards.  Fraternally  he  is  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  he  also 
belongs  to  the  Town  Criers  Club.  During  the  period  of  his  residence  in 
Waterloo,  covering  twenty  years,  he  has  become  widely  known  and  high  regard 
is  everywhere  entertained  for  him  by  those  with  whom  he  has  become  associated 
through  political,  business  or  social  connections. 


ALFRED  W.  MULLAN. 


Alfred  W.  Mullan,  the  present  efficient  city  attorney  of  Waterloo,  was  bom 
in  the  city  which  is  still  his  home,  a  son  of  Judge  C.  W.  Mullan,  of  whom  ex- 
tended mention  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  At  the  usual  age  Alfred  W. 
Mullan  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools  and  passed  through  consecutive 
grades  until  graduated  from  the  high  school  with  the  class  of  1901.  He  after- 
ward attended  Grinnell  College  at  Grinnell,  Iowa,  and  then  in  preparation  for  the 
practice  of  law  entered  the  University  of  Iowa  as  a  law  student  and  won  his 
LL.  B.  degree  upon  graduation  with  the  class  of  1908.  The  same  year  he  was 
admitted  to  the  Iowa  bar  and  has  since  practiced  law  in  Waterloo  with  the 
exception  of  two  or  three  years  spent  in  traveling.  There  is  no  question  as  to 
his  ability.  He  is  one  of  the  youngest  but  also  one  of  the  most  brilliant  lawyers 
of  Waterloo  and  his  capability  was  recognized  in  his  election  to  the  office  of  city 
attorney  in  1914.  He  is  a  member  of  the  State  Bar  Association  and  his  fellow 
members  of  the  bar  recognize  his  power  and  resourcefulness.  He  was  gifted  by 
nature  with  strong  mentality  and  its  development  was  wisely  directed.  He  also 
keeps  in  touch  with  questions  of  general  interest  and  thus  is  broadening  the 
foundation  upon  which  his  success  in  practice  is  built. 


FRANK  P.  KEANE. 


Frank  P.  Keane,  an  able  attorney  at  law  of  Waterloo,  has  here  practiced  his 
profession  continuously  for  the  past  five  years  and  is  accorded  an  extensive  and 
gratifying  clientage.  His  birth  occurred  in  Buchanan  county,  Iowa,  on  the  13th 
of  June,  i88t,  his  parents  being  John  and  Ellen  (Considine)  Keane,  the  former 
a  native  of  Ireland  and  the  latter  of  Iowa.  In  1873,  on  reaching  his  majority, 
John  Keane  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  L'nited  States,  locating  first  in  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  but  subsequently  removing  to  Chicago,  Illinois.  In  1877  he  came 
west  to  Iowa,  taking  up  his  abode  in  Buchanan  county,  where  he  was  married 
soon  afterward  and  settled  down  to  farming.  In  1885  he  removed  to  Black 
Hawk  county,  purchasing  land  in  Lester  township,  where  he  still  makes  his  home. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  109 

The  period  of  his  residence  here  now  covers  about  three  decades  and  he  is 
well  known  and  highly  esteemed  as  a  representative  citizen  and  prosperous  agri- 
culturist. 

Frank  P.  Keane  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  country  schools  and  con- 
tinued his  studies  in  St.  Joseph's  College  of  Ditbuque  and  later  in  Drake  Uni- 
versity. Subsequently  he  prepared  for  a  professional  career  in  the  College  of 
Law  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa  at  Iowa  City  and  won  the  degree  of  LL.B. 
in  1909.  In  June  of  that  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  Iowa  state  bar  and  located 
for  practice  in  Waterloo,  opening  offices  in  the  Lafayette  building.  Since  the 
completion  of  the  First  National  Bank  building,  however,  he  has  maintained  his 
offices  there.  The  zeal  with  which  he  has  devoted  his  .energies  to  his  profession, 
the  careful  regard  evinced  for  the  interests  of  his  clients  and  an  assiduous  and 
unrelaxing  attention  to  all  the  details  of  his  cases,  have  brought  him  a  large 
business  and  made  him  very  successful  in  its  conduct. 

In  1910  Mr.  Keane  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Catherine  Purtell,  of 
Chicago,  Illinois,  by  whom  he  has  two  children,  Helen  I.  and  Francis  E.  Mr. 
Keane  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy  and  is  identified  fra- 
ternally with  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  the  Foresters,  the  Modern  Woodmen 
of  America,  the  Royal  Arcanum  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  Both  he 
and  his  wife  are  devout  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church. 


P.  J.  MARTIN. 


P.  J.  Martin  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  in  Waterloo  and  his 
efforts  in  that  direction  have  not  only  been  a  source  of  individual  profit  but  also 
of  the  city's  advancement  and  improvement.  He  it  was  who  instituted  the  first 
lot  sale  on  the  installment  plan  in  Waterloo,  and  something  of  the  extent  of  his 
business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  sold  more  than  one  thousand  lots  in 
the  city.  His  birth  occurred  in  Hardin  county,  Iowa,  in  i860.  He  was  reared 
upon  a  farm  there  with  the  usual  experiences  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  country- 
bred  boy  who  divides  his  time  between  the  work  of  the  fields  and  the  duties  of 
the  schoolroom.  He  remained  on  the  old  homestead  until  twenty-one  years 
of  age  and  then  began  learning  telegraphy.  He  mastered  the  business  and  for 
thirteen  years  was  employed  as  an  operator  by  the  Chicago  &  Northwestern 
and  the  Iowa  Central  Railroad  Companies.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period 
he  turned  his  attention  to  the  drug  business,  conducting  a  store  at  Lake  City, 
Iowa,  and  at  other  points  for  about  four  years. 

In  1897  ^^-  Martin  came  to  W^aterloo,  where  he  opened  a  real-estate  office 
and  has  since  been  actively  and  prominently  engaged  in  that  fine  of  business, 
buying,  selling  and  platting  property.  He  originated  the  idea  of  selling  lots  on 
the  installment  plan,  thus  disposing  of  the  Grand  Mew  addition  in  1905.  This 
has  proved  such  a  popular  and  excellent  method  of  disposing  of  realty  that  he 
has  now  sold  more  than  one  thousand  lots,  enabling  many  a  man  to  obtain  a 
home  who  could  not  have  done  so  if  full  cash  payment  had  been  required.  He 
also  handles  farm  property  and  Texas  lands  and  has  negotiated  many  important 
realty  transfers  in  that  state  as  well  as  in  Iowa.     Mr.  Martin  has  extended  his 


110  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

efforts   into  other  fields  and  is  now   tinancially  interested  in  a  number  of   im- 
portant enterprises  in  Waterloo. 

In  1884  Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  to  ^liss  Jessie  L.  Ayres,  of 
Eldora,  Iowa,  by  whom  he  has  three  children,  namely:  Blanche  I.,  Gladys  W. 
and  Dorothy  M.  The  parents  hold  membership  in  the  Universalist  church  and 
Mr.  Martin  is  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  He  belongs  to  the  Knights 
of  Pythias  lodge  and  is  a  very  prominent  Mason,  connected  with  all  the  dif- 
ferent bodies  of  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rites,  while  upon  him  has  been 
conferred  the  honorary  thirty-third  degree.  His  prominence  in  the  order  is 
indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  was  grand  master  of  the  grand  lodge  of  Iowa.  Ik- 
is  also  an  active  factor  in  politics  and  has  filled  a  number  of  local  ofifices,  in- 
cluding that  of  mayor,  in  which  he  served  for  four  years,  from  1901  until  1905, 
giving  to  the  city  a  businesslike  and  public-spirited  administration  characterized 
by  advancement  and  improvement  along  many  lines.  The  steps  in  his  orderly 
progression  are  easily  discernible,  for  from  the  outset  of  his  career  he  has 
gradually  worked  his  way  upward,  proving  his  ability  in  many  ways.  He  is 
today  regarded  as  a  forceful  and  resourceful  business  man  of  Waterloo  and  one 
whose  efforts  have  been  highly  beneficial  along  many  lines. 


CLAYTON  E.  BRONSON. 

Wide-awake,  alert,  enterprising  and  at  all  times  watchful  of  opportunities, 
Clayton  E.  Bronson  has  gained  a  creditable  position  in  insurance  circles,  is  also 
known  as  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  republican  party  in  Black  Hawk  county  and 
was  elected  state  representative  in  November,  19 14.  He  was  born  at  Raymond, 
in  this  county,  September  i,  1881.  a  son  of  Lyman  H.  and  Frances  (Butterfield ) 
Bronson.  The  mother,  who  w-as  a  native  of  New  York,  passed  away  in  Novem- 
ber, 191 2.  The  father,  w^ho  survives,  is  a  native  of  Connecticut  and  in  1858 
took  up  his  abode  in  Raymond,  Black  Hawk  county,  where  he  resided  until 
after  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  Avar,  when  he  enlisted  at  Waterloo  in  1863  as  a 
member  of  the  First  Iowa  Cavalry,  remaining  at  the  front  until  the  close  of 
hostilities  and  rendering  valiant  aid  to  the  cause  which  he  espoused.  He  voted 
for  Abraham  Lincoln  in  i860  and  has  always  been  a  stanch  republican,  never 
failing  to  vote  for  each  presidential  candidate  of  the  party  since  that  time  save 
in  1864,  when  he  was  on  the  field  of  battle.  Folio v;ing  his  return  at  the  close 
of  the  war  he  became  identified  with  agricultural  interests  in  Black  Hawk 
county  and  was  also  president  for  many  years  of  the  Black  Hawk  County 
Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company.  In  1900  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he 
established  his  present  insurance  business.  He  has  now  resided  in  this  county 
for  more  than  a  half  century  and  has  been  an  interested  witness  of  its  con- 
tinued growth  and  development.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  interest  in 
politics  and  done  considerable  to  shape  the  history  of  the  county  along  that 
line,  yet  he  has  never  been  an  ofifice  seeker. 

His  son,  Clayton  E.  Bronson,  pursued  a  public-school  education,  which  he 
completed  by  graduation  from  the  East  Waterloo  high  school  with  the  class  of 
1903.     He  afterward  became  associated  with  his   father  in  the  insurance  busi- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  111 

ness  under  the  firm  style  of  L.  H.  Bronson  &  Son,  conducting  a  general  insur- 
ance business.  This  is  one  of  the  oldest  insurance  firms  in  the  city,  the  business 
having  been  established  on  the  ist  of  January,  1900,  by  the  senior  partner.  The 
insurance  which  they  write  annually  amounts  to  a  large  figure,  for  they  have 
gained  an  extensive  clientage  by  reason  of  their  honorable  business  methods, 
their  well  directed  persistency  and  the  fact  that  they  represent  a  number  of  the 
most  substantial  old  line  companies.  Aside  from  that  business  Clayton  E. 
Bronson  is  also  interested  in  several  manufacturing  enterprises  and  other  busi- 
ness concerns  of  Waterloo  and  his  sound  judgment  and  keen  sagacity  constitute 
elements  in  their  continued  success.  He  is  likewise  interested  in  real  estate  in 
East  Waterloo,  having  made  investments  from  time  to  time  until  he  is  the  owner 
of  considerable  property. 

On  the  6th  of  October,  19 10,  Mr.  Bronson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Nina  Wangler.  a  daughter  of  R.  C.  Wangler,  of  Waterloo.  .  They  have  one 
daughter,  Esther  Jean.  Mr.  Bronson  and  his  family  are  widely  and  favorably 
known  in  the  city  where  they  reside.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers 
Club,  of  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  of  the  Commercial  Club  and 
Board  of  Trade — associations  which  indicate  much  of  the  nature  of  his  interests 
and  activities.  He  has  always  been  deeply  interested  in  politics  from  his  boy- 
hood days,  giving  his  political  support  to  the  republican  party,  but  he  was  for 
the  first  time  a  candidate  for  office,  when  in  November,  1914,  he  was  elected 
representative  in  the  state  legislature.  Whether  in  office  or  out  of  it,  he  is 
loyal  to  the  best  interests  of  his  community  and  belongs  to  that  class  of  repre- 
sentative men  who  are  constantly  pushing  forward  the  wheels  of  progress. 


WALTER  A.  BRYANT,  Jr. 

Walter  A.  Bryant,  Jr.,  is  the  secretary  of  the  Bryant  Asphalt  Pavement 
Company,  controlling  one  of  the  chief  industrial  enterprises  of  Black  Hawk 
county.  He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose,  allowing  no  obstacles  or  difficulties 
to  bar  his  path  if  they  can  be  overcome  by  persistent,  earnest  and  honorable 
efifort.  Energy  has  been  the  key  that  has  unlocked  for  him  the  portals  of  suc- 
cess, and,  stepping  over  the  threshold,  he  has  found  broader  opportunities  which 
he  is  now  wisely  utilizing. 

A  native  of  Illinois,  Mr.  Bryant  came  to  Iowa  when  his  parents  removed  to 
Cedar  Falls,  at  which  time  he  was  a  lad  of  eight  years.  His  youthful  days  were 
there  spent  and  the  joys  and  pleasures  of  boyhood  divided  his  time  with  the 
work  of  the  schoolroom.  He  was  comparatively  young  when  he  put  aside  his 
text-books  and  began  to  earn  his  living  as  an  employe  of  the  Burlington,  Cedar 
Rapids  &  Northern  Railroad,  remaining  in  active  connection  with  that  company 
for  five  years.  He  then  resigned  his  position  and  turned  his  attention  to  the 
lumber  business,  in  which  he  engaged  at  Cedar  Falls  in  partnership  with  his 
father.  The  new  enterprise  prospered  from  the  beginning  and  W.  A.  Bryant,  Jr., 
continued  in  active  connection  therewith  for  fourteen  years,  or  until  1907,  in 
which  year  the  Bryant  Asphalt  Pavement  Company  was  organized  and  incor- 
porated with  a  capital  stock  of  two  hundred  thousand  dollars.     Of  this  company. 


112  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

W.  A.  Bryant,  Sr.,  living  at  Cedar  Falls,  is  now  the  president,  with  P.  L.  Bryant 
as  vice  president,  W.  A.  Bryant,  Jr.,  as  secretary  and  G.  E.  Rolston  as  treasurer. 
They  concentrate  their  energies  largely  upon  asphalt  paving  and  since  the  organ- 
ization of  the  company  they  have  laid  two  million  yards  of  asphalt  pavement  in 
various  cities,  over  a  half  million  yards  being  in  Waterloo.  There  is  no  finer 
asphalt  pavement  to  be  found  m  any  city  in  the  country  and  Waterloo  may  well 
be  proud  of  her  public  highways. 

Mr.  Bryant  is  also  interested  in  the  W\  A.  Bryant  &  Sons  Company,  dealers 
in  coal  and  building  materials,  and  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Bryant  Motor 
Car  Company.  The  firms  with  which  he  is  connected  have  advanced  steadily 
toward  success.  It  is  probable  that  all  of  the  days  in  his  career  have  not  been 
equally  bright  but  he  possesses  the  strong  purpose  and  firm  determination  that 
win  success  through  honorable  eflort  and  throughout  his  entire  career  he  has 
ever  followed  a  course  which  he  believed  to  be  right  between  himself  and  his 
fellowmen. 

Mr.  Bryant  has  fraternal  relations  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of 
Elks  and  is  identified  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Waterloo  Club 
and  also  with  the  Town  Criers  Club.  His  nature  is  by  no  means  self-centered 
but  reaches  out  in  sympathetic  and  helpful  interest  to  many  movements  for  the 
world's  good  and  his  public  spirit  finds  many  tangible  proofs  in  his  relation  to 
the  community. 


MAJOR  WILLIAM  CULLEN  BRYANT. 

Major  William  Cullen  Bryant,  long  an  honored  and  respected  citizen  of  Cedar 
Falls,  where  for  an  extended  period  he  engaged  in  the  drug  business,  was  born 
in  Gilbertsville,  New  York,  April  12,  1841,  a  son  of  John  and  Harriet  C.  (Gilbert) 
Bryant,  the  former  a  native  of  Chesterfield,  Massachusetts,  and  the  latter  of 
England.  The  parents  died  during  the  early  boyhood  of  their  son,  William  Cullen. 
after  which  he  resided  with  an  older  sister  and  her  husband,  who  removed  west- 
ward to  Oshkosh,  Wisconsin,  when  Mr.  Bryant  was  a  little  lad  of  nine  years.  He 
was  there  living  at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  and  his  patriotic 
spirit  was  aroused  by  the  attempt  of  the  south  to  overthrow  the  Union.  Accord- 
ingly he  enlisted  at  Oshkosh  as  a  member  of  Company  E,  Second  Wisconsin 
Regiment,  which  became  a  part  of  the  famous  "Iron"  Brigade.  After  remaining 
for  a  time  at  the  front  he  obtained  a  commission  as  a  lieutenant  in  a  regiment  of 
colored  troops  and  ultimately  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  captain,  while  on  the 
13th  of  March,  1865,  he  was  advanced  to  the  rank  of  major.  He  remained  for 
six  years  in  the  service,  for  after  the  cessation  of  hostilities,  which  resulted  in 
the  preservation  of  the  Union,  he  served  on  the  frontier  in  Texas  for  a  time. 
It  was  there  that  he  contracted  a  severe  cold  which  brought  on  physical  conditions 
that  ultimately  terminated  his  life.  Having  remained  in  the  service  for  two  years 
after  the  close  of  the  war  he  was  honorably  discharged  and  mustered  out  in 
January,  1867,  at  Baltimore,  Maryland. 

Major  Bryant  then  came  to  Iowa  and  engaged  in  the  drug  business  in  Des 
Moines,  remaining  there  for  a  year  or  two.     On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he 


MAJOR  WILLIAM'  C.  BRYANT 


J 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  115 

came  to  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  established  a  drug  store,  which  he  conducted  with 
growing  success  until  his  health  failed  him  and  he  was  thereafter  compelled  to 
spend  a  large  part  of  his  time  in  the  south.  Accordingly  he  disposed  of  his  busi- 
ness and  went  to  Florida,  where  he  remained  for  several  months  during  each 
year,  but  he  always  regarded  Cedar  Falls  as  his  home  and  continued  to  maintain 
a  residence  here  until  his  death,  which  occurred  on  the  6th  of  November,  1905. 
He  became  the  owner  of  considerable  real  estate  and  his  sound  business  judgment 
was  shown  in  his  judicious  investments  in  property.  He  was  also  a  stockholder 
in  local  banks  and  his  energy,  enterprise  and  sagacity  brought  him  substantial 
success  in  business,  so  that  he  left  his  wife  in  very  comfortable  financial  cir- 
cumstances. 

It  was  in  June,  1868,  that  Major  Bryant  was  united' in  marriage  to  Miss  Vesta 
A.  Bryant,  the  only  child  of  Dr.  Francis  A.  and  Mary  M.  (Harmon)  Bryant. 
Major  Bryant  held  membership  in  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen  and 
in  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  and  Mrs.  Bryant  is  now  a  member  of  the 
Woman's  Relief  Corps.  He  was  a  very  prominent,  helpful  and  active  member 
of  the  Congregational  church,  held  all  of  the  offices  in  the  church  and  for  twenty 
years  was  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school,  his  efforts  constituting  a  vital 
force  in  the  moral  progress  and  development  of  the  community  in  which  jie  made 
his  home.  He  was  a  man  highly  esteemed  wherever  known  and  most  of  all 
where  he  was  best  known.  His  life  record  was  one  which  would  bear  the  closest 
investigation  and  scrutiny  and  there  was  not  a  single  esoteric  chapter  in  his 
history.  He  was  constantly  doing  good  to  others  and  was  ever  reaching  out  a 
helping  hand  to  assist  a  fellow  traveler  on  life's  journey. 


O.  S.  LAMB. 


In  railway  circles  O.  S.  Lamb  is  widely  known,  being  superintendent  of  the 
Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railway  Company.  The  steps  in  his  orderly 
progression  are  easily  discernible.  He  has  steadily  advanced  since  starting  out 
on  his  own  account,  eventually  reaching  the  position  of  trust  and  responsibility 
that  he  now  occupies. 

He  was  born  in  Vernon  county,  Wisconsin,  in  1874,  and  at  the  age  of  ten 
years,  his  parents  moved  to  South  Dakota,  where  his  father  engaged  in  farming. 
In  1891,  his  parents  moved  to  Lmcoln,  Nebraska,  where  he  attended  the  Normal 
University,  pursuing  a  four-year  course.  At  the  end  of  that  time,  he  became 
an  employe  of  the  Burlington  Railway  at  Flavelock,  Nebraska,  learning  the 
machinist's  trade.  He  afterward  was  in  the  employ  of  dififerent  railways  in 
various  parts  of  the  country,  until  1905,  when  he  went  to  Oelwein,  Iowa,  where 
he  became  connected  with  the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railroad,  remaining  in 
the  shops  at  that  point  until  the  spring  of  1907,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  was  made  foreman  in  the  shops  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  & 
Northern  Railway  Company.  Subsequently  he  was  promoted  to  the  position  of 
master  mechanic,  and  afterwards  was  advanced  to  the  position  of  superintendent 
of  the  road.  His  long  experience,  covering  many  lines  of  railroad  work,  had 
well  qualified  him  for  the  onerous  duties  which  devolved  upon  him.     He  has 


116  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

studied  every  phase  of  the  business  with  which  he  has  had  to  do  and  is  thus 
capable  of  directing  the  men  who  serve  under  him.  He  is  today  regarded  as 
most  efficient  in  railroad  circles  with  which  he  has  been  connected. 

At  one  time,  he  was  air-brake  inspector  for  the  Mexican  Central  Railroad, 
with  headquarters  at  Mexico  City,  and  during  the  period  of  the  Spanish- 
American  War,  he  entered  the  service  of  the  government,  enlisting  as  a  member 
of  Company  I,  First  Nebraska  Volunteer  Regiment,  on  the  i8th  day  of  June, 
1898.  He  remained  with  that  command  until  honorably  discharged  at  San  Fran- 
cisco, California,  on  the  23d  of  August,  1899.  During  his  service  he  was  with 
the  8th  Army  Corps  in  the  Philippine  islands  and  during  that  period,  partici- 
pated in  sixteen  engagements.  His  military  record  is  a  most  creditable  one  and 
constitutes  an  interesting  chapter  in  his  life  history,  having  brought  him  many 
new  experiences. 

Following  his  return  from  the  Philippine  islands,  Mr.  Lamb  was  married  in 
1899  ^o  Miss  Katie  Cuddy,  of  Lincoln,  Nebraska.  They  have  become  the  par- 
ents of  two  children,  Kathryn  and  Virginia.  Mr.  Lamb  is  a  Mason  and  a 
member  of  the  Eastern  .Star.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of 
Trade.  He  has  thus  entered  into  active  connection  with  organizations  which 
are  seeking  to  upbuild  the  city,  extend  its  trade  relations  and  advance  its  im- 
provement in  many  ways. 


FRANK   I.  EIGHMEY. 


Throughout  his  business  career  Frank  J.  Eighmey  has  been  connected  with 
banking  interests  and  has  risen  from  the  humble  position  of  messenger  to  that 
of  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waterloo.  He  is  fortunate  in  that 
he  possesses  character  and  ability  which  inspire  confidence  in  others,  and  the 
simple  weight  of  his  character  and  ability  has  carried  him  into  important  busi- 
ness relations.  Iowa  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having  occurred  on 
a  farm  in  Black  Hawk  county  on  the  30th  of  March,  1862,  his  parents  being 
Calvin  W.  and  Katharine  (Penne)  Eighmey,  the  former  a  native  of  New  York 
and  the  latter  of  Germany.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  in 
1849  removed  westward  to  Iowa,  settling  in  Dubuque,  whence  in  1852  he  came 
to  Black  Hawk  county,  casting  in  his  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers.  In  the 
ensuing  years  he  took  an  active  and  helpful  part  in  the  work  of  general  improve- 
ment and  development  and  continued  his  residence  in  the  county  until  his  death, 
which  occurred  August  6,  1907,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-six 
years.     He  was  a  son  of  Leman  Eighmey,  also  a  native  of  the  Empire  state. 

Frank  J.  Eighmey  pursued  his  education  in  the  country  schools  and  in  Til- 
ford  Academy  at  Vinton,  Iowa,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of 
i88t.  He  afterward  attended  a  commercial  college  at  Dubuque  and  entered 
upon  his  business  career  as  messenger  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  that  city. 
He  spent  three  years  in  that  institution  and  rose  to  the  position  of  bookkeeper. 
He  then  went  to  Dell  Rapids,  South  Dakota,  where  he  organized  the  First 
National  Bank  of  that  place  and  was  made  cashier.     He  spent  a  year  there  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  117 

in  1886  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  First  National 
Bank  as  messenger.  Twenty-six  years  brought  him  advancement  through  inter- 
mediate positions  to  the  presidency,  to  which  he  was  called  in  19 12,  and  in  this 
connection  he  is  bending  his  efforts  to  administrative  direction  and  executive  con- 
trol. This  is  one  of  the  strong  financial  institutions  of  the  city,  its  progressive- 
ness  tempered  by  a  safe  conservatism,  while  its  policy  is  at  all  times  thoroughly 
reliable.  As  the  years  have  advanced  Air.  Eighmey  has  thoroughly  acquainted 
himself  with  eveiy  phase  of  the  banking  business  and  his  knowledge  and  ability 
now  enable  him  to  find  ready  solution  for  mtricate  and  involved  money  problems, 
lie  is  also  the  president  of  the  Highland  Improvement  Company  of  Waterloo 
and  is  regarded  as  a  prominent  factor  in  the  business  circles  of  the  city. 

On  the  18th  of  August,  1886,  in  South  Dakota,  Mr.  Eighmey  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Jennie  M.  Wilson,  by  whom  he  has  the  following  children: 
Gladys  K.,  who  is  the  wife  of  A.  L.  Alexander,  of  Waterloo;  Paul  W. ;  and 
Allene  M.  Mr.  Eighmey  belongs  to  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen  and 
to  the  Royal  Arcanum.  The  rules  which  govern  his  conduct  are  further  indicated 
in  the  fact  that  he  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  He  belongs 
to  the  Commercial  Club  and  cooperates  in  many  ways  in  the  plans  and  projects 
for  the  upbuilding  and  development  of  the  city.  His  political  allegiance  is  given 
to  the  republican  party  and  he  has  served  as  city  treasurer  of  Waterloo  on  several 
dift'erent  occasions  and  also  as  treasurer  of  the  school  board.  Flonored  and 
respected  by  all,  there  is  no  man  who  occupies  a  more  enviable  position  in  busi- 
ness and  financial  circles  than  does  Frank  J.  Eighmey,  not  alone  by  reason  of  the 
notable  success  he  has  attained  but  also  owing  to  the  straightforward  and  credita- 
ble business  policy  that  he  has  ever  followed. 


J.  A.  ZOOK. 


J.  A.  Zook  is  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Zook  &  Bentz,  proprietors  of  the 
oldest  plumbing  establishment  in  Waterloo,  and  a  life  of  industry,  continuous 
and  intelligently  directed,  has  brought  to  him  a  substantial  measure  of  pros- 
perity. He  was  born  in  Jackson  county,  Iowa,  April  13,  1861,  a  son  of  Jacob 
and  Fllizabeth  (Goodwin)  Zook,  who  came  to  this  state  from  Indiana  about 
1854.  The  father  purchased  a  farm  ten  miles  from  Maquoketa,  residing  thereon 
until  about  1882,  when  he  removed  to  Cedar  county,  where  his  death  occurred 
a  decade  later,  or  in  1892,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-six  years. 
His  wife  passed  away  in  1903,  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-one  years. 

J.  A.  Zook  spent  his  boyhood  days  in  his  parents"  home  and  during  that 
period  attended  the  public  schools  in  the  acquirement  of  that  education  which 
has  been  the  basis  of  his  subsequent  business  advancement.  When  about  eighteen 
years  of  age  he  went  to  work  in  a  hardware  store  in  Tripoli,  Iowa,  and  in  1882 
made  his  way  to  Winnipeg,  Canada,  where  he  again  found  employment  in  a 
hardware  establishment.  While  thus  engaged  he  took  up  the  plumber's  trade, 
dividing  his  time  between  the  store  and  work  at  the  trade  for  a  year  or  more. 
Later  he  returned  to  Iowa,  settling  in  Cherokee,  Avhere  he  continued  work  at 
the  hardware  business  and  also  at  the  plumber's  trade,  remaining  in  that  city 


118  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

for  five  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Waterloo  in  1890 
and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Cutler  Hardware  Company,  with  which  he  re- 
mained for  three  years.  In  February,  1893,  he  embarked  in  the  plumbing  busi- 
ness on  his  own  account  and  for  two  years  operated  independently.  In  1895  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  George  L.  Wilber,  organizing  the  firm  of  Zook  «& 
Wilber.  and  a  year  later  Charles  K.  Bentz  became  one  of  the  owners  of  the 
business,  buying  out  the  interest  of  Mr.  Wilber.  Smce  that  time  the  firm  of 
Zook  &  Bentz  has  conducted  the  leading  plumbing  establishment  of  Waterloo, 
with  a  business  that  in  volume  and  importance  exceeds  all  others. 

In  1884  Mr.  Zook  married  Miss  Nellie  A.  Monty,  of  Allison,  Iowa,  by  whom 
he  has  six  children,  as  follows:  Beatrice,  who  is  the  wnit  of  Dr.  R.  D.  Tififany, 
of  Hollywood,  California ;  Marguerite,  at  home ;  Earl,  engaged  in  the  insurance 
business,  who  is  also  at  home;  and  Irene,  Robert  and  Jack,  who  are  likewise 
yet  under  the  parental  roof.  Irene  and  Robert  are  high-school  students,  while 
Jack  is  in  the  grammar  school. 

Mr.  Zook  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and  meas- 
ures of  the  republican  party  but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  ofiice  have  had 
no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  has  always  preferred  to  devote  his  attention  to  his 
business  afifairs.  Fraternally  Air.  Zook  is  connected  with  Waterloo  Lodge,  No. 
105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Waterloo  Chapter,  No.  52,  R.  A.  M. ;  Ascalon  Command- 
ery.  No.  25,  K.  T. ;  and  Helmet  Lodge  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  In  these 
organizations  he  is  well  known  and  his  worth  is  just  as  widely  recognized  in 
business  circles  and  in  social  relations. 


WTLLIAM   P.  EIGENMANN. 

William  P.  Eigenmann  is  the  president  and  manager  of  the  Artificial  Ice  & 
Fuel  Company  and,  working  his  way  steadily  upward  since  the  outset  of  his 
career,  he  has  reached  a  creditable  position,  his  record  proving  what  may  be 
accomplished  when  determination  and  energy  are  the  salient  traits  of  character. 
He  has  lived  in  Waterloo  for  only  three  years  but  during  this  period  has  made  a 
most  commendable  record  and  today  enjoys  the  high  regard,  confidence  and 
good-will  of  his  fellow  townsmen.  He  was  born  in  1876,  in  Rockport,  Spencer 
county,  Indiana,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated.  He  became  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  ice  at  Rockport,  and  there  continued  in  business  for  sixteen 
years.  In  fact,  throughout  his  entire  business  career  he  has  been  connected  with 
this  line  of  activity  and  there  is  no  feature  of  the  business  with  which  he  is  not 
familiar. 

In  September,  191 1,  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  since  that  time  has  been  most 
active  in  developing  the  interests  of  the  Artificial  Ice  &  Fuel  Company,  of  which 
he  is  now  the  president.  The  plant  was  established  in  1907,  manufacturing  ice 
that  year  for  the  first  time.  In  1909  the  business  was  incorporated  with  a  capital 
stock  of  forty-two  thousand  dollars,  Amos  Wood,  Sr.,  being  the  first  president. 
At  that  time  the  incorporated  name  was  the  Waterloo  Artificial  Ice  Company. 
In  March,  1914,  a  reorganization  occurred  and  the  name  of  the  corporation  was 
changed  to  the  Artificial  Ice  &  Fuel  Company.    The  new  company  was  capitalized 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  119 

for  twenty-live  thousand  dollars,  with  William  P.  Eigenmann  as  president  and 
manager  and  R.  W.  Gibson  secretary  and  treasurer.  They  have  a  capacity  of 
thirty  tons,  which  they  expect  to  increase  to  forty  tons  before  the  close  of  the 
year.  Their  ice  business  has  increased  steadily  and  they  also  enjoy  a  gratifying- 
trade  in  fuel.  Their  business  methods  are  thoroughly  reliable  and  a  spirit  of 
progress  actuates  them  at  all  times. 

Mr.  Eigenmann  was  married  in  1903  to  Miss  Molly  Gage,  of  Grand  View, 
Indiana,  and  they  have  one  son,  Loren  Gage.  Mr.  Eigenmann  holds  member- 
ship in  the  Masonic  fraternity,  having  attained  the  Royal  Arch  degree.  He  also 
belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  to  the  Commercial  Club 
and  Board  of  Trade.  Waterloo  is  actuated  by  a  spirit  of  advancement  and  a 
great  many  of  her  business  men  are  associated  in  a  combined  and  unified  efifort 
to  promote  the  trade  interests  of  the  city,  with  a  result  that  is  manifest  in  the 
rapid  and  substantial  growth  which  Waterloo  has  enjoyed  in  recent  years.  With 
this  movement  Mr.  Eigenmann  has  become  identified  and  responds  readily  to 
every  call  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  town  and  county.  At  the  same  time 
he  carefully  and  wisely  directs  his  individual  interests  and  year  by  year  his 
success  is  increasing. 


JOHN  E.  O'KEEFE,  M.  D. 

Dr.  John  E.  O'Keefe  is  the  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  O'Keefe,  Brown  & 
Hoftmann,  which  is  one  of  the  leading  firms  of  physicians  and  surgeons  not 
only  of  Waterloo  but  of  this  section  of  the  state.  All  three  are  progressive, 
energetic  young  men  actuated  by  laudable  ambition  to  attain  high  rank  in  their 
profession,  and  already  pronounced  ability  has  gained  them  notable  prominence. 
Dr.  O'Keefe  was  born  in  Black  Hawk  county,  September  6,  1871,  and  was 
reared  to  farm  life  until  he  attained  his  sixteenth  year,  attending  the  district 
schools.  At  that  period  in  his  life  he  entered  the  Waterloo  Collegiate  &  Com- 
mercial Institute,  from  which  he  was  graduated  when  twenty-one  years  of  age 
or  in  1892.  In  the  fall  of  that  year  he  entered  the  College  of  Medicine  of  the 
University  of  Iowa  and  is  numbered  among  the  alumni  of  that  institution  of 
the  class  of  1896. 

Following  his  graduation  Dr.  O'Keefe  opened  an  office  at  Eagle  Center, 
Iowa,  and  a  year  later,  or  in  1897,  came  to  Waterloo.  In  the  intervening  period 
of  seventeen  years  that  has  brought  him  to  the  present  he  has  placed  himself 
in  the  front  rank  of  medical  practitioners  in  this  city.  He  has  constantly  read 
and  studied  and  has  drawn  logical  and  valuable  deductions  from  his  experience. 
He  is  always  careful  m  the  diagnosis  of  his  cases  and  his  efforts  have  been 
attended  with  most  creditable  success.  Since  1903  he  has  given  his  attention 
largely  to  special  preparation  for  surgical  work.  He  took  the  regular  surgical 
course  in  the  New  York  Post  Graduate  School  and  Hospital  in  that  year  and 
the  same  year  took  special  work  in  the  New  York  Polyclinic  School  and  FIos- 
pital.  F"or  several  years  past  he  has  made  it  a  point  to  attend  each  year  the 
leading  clinics  of  the  United  States  and  in  1914  he  visited  the  large  hospitals 
and  medical  centers  of  Great   Britain  and  Europe,   investigating  the  advanced 


120  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

methods  of  eminent  physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  old  world.  He  has  kept 
abreast  of  the  improvement  in  medical  and  surgical  science  at  all  times  and  is 
today  ranked  among  Waterloo's  most  successful  professional  men.  He  belongs 
to  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  the 
Iowa  State  Medical  Society  and  the  American  Medical  Association.  He  is 
likewise  a  member  of  the  Austin  Flint  District  Medical  Society  and  the  Missouri 
\  alley  Medical  Society,  the  Clinical  Congress  of  Surgeons  of  North  America 
and  at  the  present  time  is  a  delegate  of  the  last  named  to  the  convention  which 
will  meet  in  Boston,  Massachusetts,  in  191 5,  havmg  been  elected  while  attending 
the  session  of  that  organization  that  convened  in  London,  England.  He  was  the 
first  secretary  of  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  has  also  served  as  its  president 
and  has  been  president  of  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society. 

In  1898  Dr.  O'Keefe  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Dora  Wade,  of  Nor- 
folk, Nebraska.  Dr.  O'Keefe  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  290,  ]>.  P.  O.  E., 
to  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  to  the  Catholic  church.  In  these  are  mdicated 
the  underlying  principles  which  govern  his  actions  and  guide  him  in  every  rela- 
tion. He  has  ever  manifested  the  deepest  interest  in  his  profession,  finds  joy 
in  adding  to  his  knowledge  and  in  discovering  new  methods  which  are  of  value. 
As  the  years  have  passed  on  he  has  progressed  by  reason  of  his  broad  study  and 
increasing  experience,  and  the  confidence  entertained  in  his  professional  ability 
is  indicated  in  the  liberal  patronage  accorded  him. 


WILLIAM  A.  WELTY. 


William  A.  W'elty,  the  inventor  and  patentee  of  Welty's  fountain  pen  and 
now  a  resident  of  Waterloo,  was  born  in  Ohio  in  1873  and  comes  of  German  and 
Scotch-Irish  parentage.  In  early  boyhood  he  acquired  an  excellent  education  and 
at  all  times  during  his  life  has  been  much  inclined  to  mechanical  investigation, 
even  as  a  boy  having  equipped  a  workshop  in  his  owm  home.  He  .sold  books  in 
order  to  acquire  the  means  that  would  enable  him  to  pursue  a  college  education 
and  in  early  life  he  was  also  elected  by  his  church  as  financial  secretary  of  the 
Ashland  University  at  Ashland,  Ohio,  and  during  his  incumbency  in  that  office 
he  cleared  the  university  of  indebtedness.  While  traveling  throughout  the  llnited 
States  in  order  to  raise  funds  for  the  school  he  gained  an  unusual  insight  into 
business  affairs  which  fitted  him  for  the  commercial  career  upon  which  he  after- 
ward entered. 

In  1903  Mr.  Welty  became  connected  with  the  rtrm  of  Matt  Parrott  &  Sons 
as  blank  book  salesman  and  auditor,  at  which  time  he  took  up  the  sale  of  fountain 
pens  as  a  side  line.  Continued  complaints  of  dealers  and  users  of  leaking,  blot- 
ting and  dropping  convinced  him  that  something  very  essential  had  been  missed 
in  pen  construction.  The  public  declared  that  fountain  pens  never  would  be  a 
success.  Careful  investigation  disclosed  that  while  hundreds  of  more  or  less 
practical  ideas  had  been  used,  particularly  as  to  the  methods  of  filling,  etc..  that 
absolutely  nothing  had  been  done  which  would  improve  the  feeding  of  the  ink — 
right  where  the  real  trouble  lay. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  121 

The  fountain  pen  industry  at  that  time  was  only  twenty-one  years  old  and 
most  of  the  factories  had  been  going  ahead  on  the  old  plug  feed  idea,  taking  it 
for  granted  that  if  any  improvements  could  be  made,  Paul  E.  Wirt,  the  original 
manufacturer,  or  one  of  the  older  organizations,  would  make  them.  Some  of 
these  manufacturers  knew  that  most  of  the  dropping  and  leaking  was  due  to 
a  lack  of  proper  air  entrance  and  were  trying  various  ways  to  control  this.  These 
facts  were  ]\Ir.  Welty's  inspiration.  While  others  hesitated  he  pondered,  and 
one  Sunday,  while  resting  in  a  hotel,  the  comparison  of  the  spasmodic  flow  from 
the  neck  of  a  bottle  suddenly  occurred  to  him.  That  bubble  of  air  must  certainly 
go  up  the  single  feed  channel  in  a  fountain  pen,  as  they  were  then  constructed, 
just  the  same  as  it  did  in  the  neck  of  a  bottle.  He  knew  that  if  you  held  a  bottle 
at  an  angle  to  empty  it,  the  flow  is  less  spasmodic  than  if  held  straight  upside 
down.  Right  here  dawned  the  great  idea  of  the  air  vent  in  the  feed  and  he  at 
once  took  the  plug  feed  out  of  one  of  his  samples  and  set  to  work  with  a  pocket 
knife  and  file  and  roughly  cut  out  a  model.  This  worked  better  and  on  showing 
it  to  several  dealers  they  urged  him  to  obtain  a  patent,  for  which  he  applied 
December  6,  1904,  and  which  was  granted  November  7,  1905.  To  reach  a  further 
degree  of  feed  perfection  he  conceived  the  idea  of  the  "side  or  sub  ducts,"  which 
was  patented  on  October  30,  1906. 

During  this  time  Mr.  Welty  was  still  selling  blank  books  and  enjoying  a  nice 
sale  of  his  pens,  which  were  made  for  him  by  a  manufacturer  in  Janesville,  Wis- 
consin. Noting  the  growing  demand  for  self  fillers,  his  inventive  genius  again 
showed  in  the  cam  locking  ring  style  (now  known  as  the  Wawco),  which  he  also 
patented  in  1906.  The  increased  popularity  of  the  product  led  him,  in  March  of 
that  year,  to  install  a  small  plant  and  he  began  making  his  own  product  in  the 
rear  of  a  little  office  supply  store.  A  one-thousand-dollar  order  from  a  Min- 
neapolis jobber  was  a  great  encouragement,  and  as  fast  as  he  could  turn  them 
out,  Mr.  Welty  went  out  and  sold  more,  while  an  expert  pen  maker  was  also 
hired  to  help  in  the  manufacture.  A  little  advertising  in  trade  journals  and  the 
enthusiasm  of  his  friends  aroused  the  fear  of  a  then  established  manufacturer 
of  self  fillers  in  Toledo,  Ohio,  who  thought  to  intimidate  Mr.  Welty  by  infringe- 
ment proceedings,  but  the  latter  won.  While  this  case  was  pending  the  idea  came 
to  do  away  with  the  locking  ring  and  the  present  interlocking  self  filler  patent 
was  granted  March  30,  1909.  The  Toledo  firm  then  interviewed  him  with  a 
view  of  purchasing  this  patent,  but  he  refused.  They  then  made  a  very  flatter- 
ing offer  to  take  all  his  output  of  this  holder  equipped  with  the  Welty  feed,  which 
he  also  declined,  as  he  was  firmly  convinced  that  he  had  an  article  of  real  merit 
and  that  its  future  was  assured.  His  ambition  was  aroused  to  see  his  product 
in  not  only  national  but  international  demand.  Patents  had  by  now  been  granted 
him  in  foreign  countries. 

His  friends  stood  loyally  by  him.  During  an  international  Bible  conference 
of  the  Presbyterian  church  at  Winona  Lake,  Indiana,  in  August,  1907,  of  which 
a  personal  friend,  Dr.  J.  Wilbur  Chapman,  an  evangelist,  is  director,  Dr.  Chap- 
man from  the  platform  recommended  the  Welty  pen  to  an  assembly  of  five 
thousand  ministers  and  as  a  result  over  six  hundred  dollars'  worth  were  sold  at 
retail  there.  Mr.  Blessing,  manager  of  the  Presbyterian  board  of  publication, 
also  advertised  the  Welty  pen  in  his  book  catalogues  and  bulletins,  thus  assisting 
in  the  publicity  of  "The  Pen  With  Merit."     Over  three  hundred  traveling  men 


122  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

with  headquarters  in  Waterloo  became  enthusiastic  boosters  of  Welty  pens,  a 
home  product,  and  orders  were  received  from  various  quarters  through  their 
influence.     Thus  the  business  grew. 

All  this  time  Mr.  Welty  was  engaged  in  selling  at  retail  adding  machines, 
typewriters,  office  supplies,  etc.,  using  the  profits  to  forward  the  pride  of  his  life 
— the  W^elty  fountain  pen.  About  this  time  the  real  battles  developed.  The 
Welty  "New  Idea"  pen  was  rapidly  growing  in  favor  and  orders  could  not  be 
filled  owing  to  lack  of  capital  for  rough  stock  and  new  machinery.  A  silent  part- 
ner who  advanced  some  cash  did  not  help  much,  because  he  was  inactive  yet  was 
getting  most  of  the  profits.  A  new  partnership  was  formed  with  an  active  part- 
ner which  continued  for  one  year.  Again  Mr.  Welty  assumed  full  control  of  the 
business  by  purchase.  Another  time  local  capitalists  offered  to  incorporate  with 
him  with  a  paid  up  capital  of  one  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  let  Mr.  Welty 
sell  the  goods.  Here  the  unfortunate  experience  of  Roy  Conklin.  who  several 
years  before  had  been  thus  displaced  in  Toledo,  Ohio,  stood  as  an  example  to 
Mr.  Welty  and  he  declined,  being  determined  to  reap  the  benefits  of  the  product 
of  his  own  brain.  Handicapped  even  to  the  extent  of  at  times  returning  money 
sent  in  for  goods,  he  still  plugged  along,  showing  a  tenacity  of  purpose  and  busi- 
ness ability  seldom  seen  in  an  inventor.  His  unusual  selling  ability  is  demon- 
strated by  the  fact  that  all  this  time  he  had  been  doing  all  his  own  selling  and 
helping  in  the  shop  between  trips,  selling  all  he  could  get  money  enough  to  manu- 
facture, and  still  the  business  kept  on  growing.  Finally  came  a  time  w^hen  he 
found  it  a  physical  impossibility  to  handle  both  the  inside  and  outside  business 
and  offered  William  T.  Fitzpatrick,  who  was  enjoying  a  nice  business  in  the 
selling  of  Welty  pens  in  Montana,  a  third  interest,  which  the  latter  accepted. 
The  partnership  thus  resulting  was  so  harmonious  and  the  continued  expansion 
of  the  business  so  rapid  that  the  William  A.  Welty  Company  was  incorporated 
in  March,  1913,  and  with  a  further  addition  of  capital  and  increased  manufactur- 
ing and  marketing  facilities  is  enjoying  the  steady,  consistent  growth  which  merit 
always  wins.  Waterloo  has  every  reason  to  be  proud  of  the  enterprise  which  has 
here  been  established  but  prouder  still  of  the  man  whose  ability  and  indomitable 
spirit  has  made  it  possible. 


ROBERT  E.  MONTAGUE. 

The  history  of  a  community  does  not  depend  so  much  upon  the  machinery  of 
government  or  even  upon  the  men  who  fill  the  public  offices  as  those  who  control 
the  important  business  enterprises,  furnishing  a  market  for  labor  and  producing 
an  output  that  brings  the  community  into  business  relations  with  the  outside 
world.  In  this  connection  Robert  E.  Montague  is  wxll  known,  being  the  president 
of  the  Waterloo  Skirt  &  Garment  Company.  For  nine  years  he  has  made  his 
home  in  Waterloo  and  is  accounted  one  of  its  foremost  citizens.  He  is  a  native 
son  of  Illinois,  bom  in  1875,  and  came  from  that  state  to  Waterloo  in  1905. 
When  fourteen  years  of  age  he  became  connected  with  the  business  in  which  he 
is  still  engaged,  having  spent  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century  in  activity  along  this 
line.    The  Waterloo  Skirt  &  Garment  Company  was  organized  about  eleven  years 


EOBERT  E.  MONTAGUE 


1 

J 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  125 

ago.  After  a  few  years'  connection  therewith  Mr.  Montague  purchased  the  in- 
terest of  G.  B.  McWilliams  in  the  business  and  succeeded  him  in  the  presidency  of 
the  company,  which  is  incorporated  with  the  following  officials :  R.  E.  Montague, 
president;  G.  N.  See,  treasurer;  and  F.  C.  Stetzel,  secretary.  They  manufacture 
a  large  line  of  house  dresses,  petticoats,  kimonos  and  children's  wear,  and  in 
addition  to  the  extensive  plant  at  Waterloo  they  also  have  a  factory  at  Cedar 
Falls  and  at  Waverly  and  keep  on  an  average  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  employes, 
while  upon  the  road  they  are  represented  by  eighteen  traveling  salesmen.  They 
do  a  business  that  extends  from  coast  to  coast  and  something  of  the  volume  of 
their  trade  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  they  cut  up  about  ten  thousand  yards  of 
cloth  per  day  in  the  manufacture  of  their  output.  This  is  one  of  the  important 
productive  enterprises  of  the  city.  The  business  is  carefully  systematized  and 
managed.  Mr.  Montague  is  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  trade  and  has  in- 
troduced well  devised  methods  to  such  a  degree  that  there  is  no  useless  expendi- 
ture of  time,  labor  or  material — which  is  the  secret  of  all  success  in  business. 

In  1895,  Mr.  Montague  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Grace  J.  Pendleton, 
of  Tennessee,  and  they  have  a  daughter,  Gladys  Emma.  Mr.  Montague  and  his 
family  are  members  of  the  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  he  belongs  also 
to  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  of  Waterloo.  He  belongs  to  that 
public-spirited,  useful  and  helpful  type  of  men  whose  ambitioas  and  desires  are 
centered  and  directed  in  those  channels  through  which  flow  the  greatest  and  most 
permanent  good  to  the  greatest  number. 


JOHN  G.  BICKLEY,  M.  D. 

Dr.  John  G.  Bickley  is  numbered  among  the  honored  and  highly  respected 
residents  of  Waterloo,  where  he  is  now  living  retired,  although  for  an  extended 
period  he  was  actively  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  in  this  city,  of  which 
he  became  a  resident  in  1862.  He  was  then  but  ten  years  of  age,  his  birth 
having  occurred  in  Pennsylvania  in  1852.  He  was  graduated  from  the  Waterloo 
high  school  and,  having  determined  upon  the  practice  of  medicine  as  a  life  work, 
he  afterward  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  Iowa  State  University. 
Later  he  became  a  student  in  the  Jefferson  Medical  College  of  Philadelphia,  from 
which  in  due  time  he  was  graduated,  and  still  later  he  was  graduated  from  the 
Chicago  College  of  Homeopathy,  now  the  Hahnemann  Medical  College.  Immedi- 
ately afterward  he  located  in  Waterloo  and  the  thorough  preparation  which  he 
had  made  for  professional  duties  enabled  him  to  meet  with  almost  immediate 
success  in  practice. 

At  different  times  Dr.  Bickley  has  gone  abroad  for  further  study  and  in 
European  centers  has  investigated  the  methods  of  many  of  the  most  eminent 
physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  old  world.  Broad  reading  has  also  kept  him  in 
touch  with  advanced  medical  thought  and  research  and,  although  now  practically 
living  retired,  he  has  practiced  for  a  longer  period  in  Waterloo  than  any  other 
physician  of  the  city.  He  still  retains  membership  with  the  Hahnemann  Medical 
Association  of  Iowa.     As  the  years  have  gone  on  and  Dr.  Bickley  has  won  suc- 

\'ril.  II— 7 


126  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

cess  he  has  made  extensive  and  judicious  investments  in  real  estate,  in  which  he 
is  now  heavily  interested  in  Waterloo  and  its  vicinity. 

On  the  22d  of  September,  1881,  Dr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Eva  Pitcher,  who  died  in  1890,  leaving  four  sons:  Carl  C.  and  John  Cecil,  both 
of  whom  are  practicing  physicians  of  Waterloo;  Robert  S..  a  physician  of  New 
York  city ;  and  Emil  B.,  now  a  medical  student  in  Columbia  University  of  New 
York  city.  After  the  death  of  his  first  wife  Dr.  Bickley  was  married  on  the 
30th  of  April,  1910,  to  Miss  Tina  Stewart,  a  native  of  Waterloo  and  a  daughter 
of  John  and  Isabella  (Robertson)  Stewart,  who  came  to  this  city  in  May,  1867. 
The  father,  who  followed  farming  as  a  life  work,  died  about  twenty  years  ago, 
but  the  mother  is  still  living.  They  reared  a  family  of  eight  children,  all  of  whom 
reside  in  Waterloo  or  its  vicinity  with  the  exception  of  one  sister  who  is  living 
in  Canada. 

Dr.  Bickley  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Christadelphian  church.  For 
several  years  past  he  has  spent  the  winter  months  in  Los  Angeles.  California, 
while  the  summer  seasons  are  passed  in  Waterloo,  where  for  many  years  he  has 
been  numbered  among  the  foremost  citizens.  His  life  work  has  brought  him  into 
close  connection  with  many  families  here  and  he  is  no  more  highly  esteemed  for 
his  pronounced  professional  skill  than  he  is  loved  for  those  personal  qualities 
w^iich  endear  man  to  man.  Because  of  the  innate  refinement  of  his  nature  he 
rejects  everything  opposed  to  good  taste,  and  the  high  ideals  which  he  has  ever 
cherished  for  his  profession,  in  citizenship  and  for  the  individual  find  embodi- 
ment in  practical  effort  for  their  adoption. 


J.  E.  ARMSTRONG. 


J.  E.  Armstrong  is  president  of  the  Armstrong  Manufacturing  Com.pany  of 
Waterloo,  in  which  city  he  has  resided  since  1908.  Throughout  this  period  it  is 
well  known  that  his  business  has  ever  balanced  up  with  the  principles  of  truth 
and  honor  and  he  has  become  the  strong  center  of  the  community  in  which  he 
moves.  The  enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  the  head  and  which  is  Waterloo's 
pioneer  manufacturing  industry  had  its  inception  in  1867.  A  half  century  ago 
Henry  Kelley  invented  and  patented  the  cam  and  treadle  drilling  machine  and  in 
1867  he  with  several  associates  organized  this  company  under  the  name  of  the 
Morgan,  Kelley  &  Taneyhill  Company,  the  name  being  later  changed  to  Kelley 
&  Taneyhill.  After  Mr.  Kelley's  death  it  was  again  changed,  becoming  in  1909 
the  Armstrong-Ouam  Manufacturing  Company,  which  name  was  continued  until 
the  present  title  of  the  Armstrong  Manufacturing  Company  was  adopted  in  191 1. 
The  business  had  been  incorporated  in  1900.  Since  1867  this  company  has  been 
continuously  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  the  most  successful  and  complete 
line  of  portable  well  drilling  and  prospecting  machinery  and  supplies  on  the 
market  and  for  a  number  of  years  has  been  manufacturing  a  complete  line  of 
high  grade  gasoline  engines.  The  present  capitalization  of  the  company  is 
two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  the  officials  are:  J.  E.  Armstrong, 
president ;  J.  F.  Landgraf ,  vice  president ;  and  C.  L.  Armstrong,  secretary  and 
treasurer.     The  business  has  grown  to  extensive  and  gratifying  proportions  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  127 

they  now  have  branch  houses  at  Saskatoon,  Saskatchewan,  Canada ;  Los  Angeles, 
CaUfornia,  and  in  New  York  city.  Their  factory  buildings  cover  an  entire  block 
and  their  large  and  commodious  office  building  is  located  upon  the  opposite  side 
of  the  street.  The  plant  is  thoroughly  equipped  with  the  latest  improved  machin- 
ery to  facilitate  the  work  and  the  extensive  output  is  sent  not  only  to  all  parts 
of  this  country  but  they  likewise  do  an  extensive  business  in  foreign  trade. 

Aside  from  his  interests  in  this  connection  Mr.  Armstrong  is  president  of  the 
Charles  City  Engine  Company  and  is  vice  president  of  the  Novelty  Iron  Works 
at  Dyersville,  Iowa.  His  plans  are  carefully  formulated  and  promptly  executed 
and  he  readily  recognizes  the  possibilities  of  a  situation  and  utilizes  its  opportuni- 
ties. He  is  diligent  and  determined  and  possesses  in  large  measure  the  spirit 
of  initiative.  Through  the  steps  of  progressive  achievement  he  has  reached  his 
present  notable  position  as  one  of  the  foremost  business  men  of  Waterloo.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  is  interested  in 
promoting  in  every  possible  way  the  business  connections  of  the  city. 


RUSSELL  L.  DEGON. 


Waterloo  on  the  whole  has  been  signally  favored  in  the  class  of  men  who  have 
occupied  her  public  offices.  Among  these  in  the  year  1914  is  Russell  L.  Degon, 
who  is  serving  as  city  clerk  and  auditor  and  is  making  a  creditable  record  in  the 
office.  He  was  born  in  Racine,  Wisconsin,  in  1883,  a  son  of  James  D.  and  Etta 
E.  (James)  Degon,  who  reside  at  No.  932  Logan  avenue  in  Waterloo,  the  father 
being  now  a  passenger  conductor  on  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad. 

Although  born  in  Wisconsin,  Russell  L.  Degon  was  but  a  young  lad  when  his 
parents  removed  with  their  family  to  Freeport,  Illinois,  where  his  childhood  days 
were  passed  and  his  education  was  largely  acquired.  After  attending  the  public 
schools  of  Freeport,  however,  he  entered  the  high  school  of  Dubuque,  Iowa.  He 
also  pursued  a  course  of  study  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College  and  one  month 
before  his  class  was  graduated  accepted  a  position  with  the  Illinois  Central  Rail- 
road, remaining  in  active  connection  with  the  mechanical  and  store  departments 
until  the  ist  of  January,  191 1. 

Mr.  Degon  was  then  called  to  public  office,  being  appointed  deputy  county 
auditor  of  Black  Hawk  county,  which  position  he  filled  until  April,  1912,  when  he 
was  elected  city  auditor  of  Waterloo  and  at  the  same  time  was  appointed  clerk 
by  the  city  council.  On  the  ist  of  April,  1914,  he  was  reelected  for  another  two 
years'  term  and  was  again  appointed  city  clerk.  His  official  service  is  highly 
commendable  and  will  at  all  times  bear  the  closest  investigation  and  scrutiny,  for 
he  is  prompt,  methodical  and  accurate  and  at  all  times  is  actuated  by  a  spirit  of 
devotion  to  the  public  good.  Mr.  Degon  has  always  taken  an  active  interest  in 
politics  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  and  he  has  served 
as  a  member  of  the  republican  central  committee  on  three  di'fiferent  occasions. 
He  has  also  been  a  delegate  to  the  state  conventions  of  his  party  and  his  opinions 
carry  weight  in  its  local  councils.  He  is  furthermore  connected  with  the  interests 
of  Waterloo  as  a  holder  of  city  real  estate  and  he  is  a  stockholder  m  the  Illinois 
Central  Railroad. 


128  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  1906  Mr.  Degon  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  May  Banton,  of  Waterloo, 
a  granddaughter  of  Dr.  Banton,  one  of  the  pioneer  physicians  of  the  county. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Degon  have  one  child,  Juanita  May.  The  parents  are  members  of 
Christ  Episcopal  church  and  are  held  in  high  regard  wherever  known.  Mr. 
Degon  is  very  prominent  in  fraternal  connections.  He  belongs  to  the  blue  lodge, 
chapter,  council  and  commandery,  all  Masonic  bodies  of  Waterloo,  and  he  initi- 
ated, passed  and  raised  his  father  in  the  first  three  degrees  of  the  Masonic  order. 
He  has  been  most  active  as  a  worker  in  the  craft  and  has  been  recorder  of  Ascalon 
Commandery,  No.  25,  K.  T.,  for  four  years.  He  likewise  belongs  to  El  Kahir 
Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  and  in  1907  was  the  youngest  Shriner  in  the  state. 
He  is  also  active  in  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  at  the  present 
time  is  the  esteemed  leading  knight.  He  has  membership  with  the  Tribe  of  Ben 
Hur  and  in  organizations  of  a  purely  local  character  his  connection  is  with  the 
Town  Criers  Club  and  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  of  Waterloo. 
He  has  the  happy  faculty  of  not  only  winning  but  of  retaining  the  friendship  of 
those  with  whom  he  is  brought  in  contact.  He  has  many  attractive  personal 
qualities  and  his  capability  along  various  lines  adds  to  the  high  regard  in  which 
he  is  uniformly  held  in  W\aterloo  and  throughout  T>lack  Hawk  county. 


F.  B.  DIETRICK. 


During  the  period  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo  F.  B.  Dietrick  has  made  for 
himself  a  creditable  name  in  connection  with  business  interests,  being  now  cashier 
of  the  Security  Savings  Bank.  He  was  born  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  in  1865, 
a  son  of  William  S.  and  Sarah  Ellen  Dietrick.  The  father  came  to  Iowa  in  1856 
and  settled  on  a  farm  in  Bremer  county,  where  he  lived  until  1866,  when  he 
brought  his  family  to  Waterloo,  where  he  embarked  in  merchandising,  in  which 
he  continued  for  about  two  years,  when  he  went  to  Raymond,  where  he  was  con- 
nected with  mercantile  interests  for  thirty-five  years,  or  until  the  time  of  his 
death,  becoming  one  of  the  valued  and  representative  citizens  as  well  as  leading- 
merchants  of  that  place. 

F.  B.  Dietrick  lived  in  Raymond  until  seventeen  years  of  age  and  then  engaged 
in  the  railroad  business,  learning  telegraphy.  He  spent  about  twelve  years  as  an 
operator  and  after  discontinuing  his  efforts  in  that  connection  became  an  employe 
of  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company  at  Fonda,  Iowa.  Later  he  was  made 
cashier  of  the  Randolph  State  Bank,  now  the  First  National  Bank  of  Randolph, 
in  which  he  continued  for  two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he 
returned  to  Waterloo  and  was  with  the  First  National  Bank  of  this  city  for  about 
thirteen  years.  He  then  became  cashier  of  the  Security  Savings  Bank  and  as 
such  is  widely  and  favorably  known  not  only  in  the  city,  but  also  in  the  county. 
His  ability  and  worth  are  widely  recognized.  His  powers  have  constantly 
expanded  through  the  exercise  of  eft'ort  and  gradually  he  has  worked  his  way 
upward,  utilizing  each  opportunity  to  the  best  advantage.  He  is  a  man  of  reso- 
lute purpose  and  exemplifies  in  his  life  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  age.  He  is 
a  stockholder  in  the  Security  Savings  Bank,  in  the  First  National  Bank  and  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  129 

Waterloo  Skirt  &  Garment  Company  and  has  thus  extended  his  connections  until 
in  business  circles  he  occupies  an  enviable  position. 

On  the  14th  of  May,  1889,  Mr.  Dietrick  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lillian 
H.  Beeman,  of  Des  Moines.  They  are  well  known  socially  in  Waterloo  and  are 
numbered  among  the  valued  and  consistent  members  of  Grace  Methodist  Epis- 
copal church,  in  which  Mr.  Dietrick  is  serving  on  the  official  board.  His  fraternal 
connections  are  with  the  Masons  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  he  is  a  member 
of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade.  While  laudable  ambition  has 
prompted  him  in  his  business  career  he  has  always  recognized  the  duties  of 
citizenship  and  has  met  his  obligations  in  that  connection  in  a  most  commendable 
way.  Iowa  has  reason  to  be  proud  to  number  him  among  her  native  sons  and  in 
Waterloo,  where  he  has  long  resided,  he  has  gained  an  extensive  circle  of  friends. 


R.  A.  ELLIS. 


R.  A.  Ellis  is  an  enterprising  business  man  of  Waterloo,  where  he  has  made 
his  home  for  fourteen  years.  He  represents  industrial  activity  here  as  senior 
partner  in  the  firm  of  Ellis  &  Foster,  proprietors  of  a  plumbing  establishment. 
Moreover,  he  is  closely  connected  with  the  city's  welfare  and  the  management  of 
municipal  interests  as  alderman  at  large. 

Mr.  Ellis  was  born  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  in  1866,  a  son  of  J.  G.  Ellis,  a 
native  of  England,  who  on  first  coming  to  the  United  States  settled  in  New  York. 
In  1853  hs  traveled  westward  with  an  ox  team  to  what  was  then  the  frontier, 
establishing  his  home  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa.  He  was  the  first  sheriff  elected 
in  that  county  and  served  for  three  terms  at  a  time  when  crime  was  rampant, 
especially  horse  stealing,  and  he  had  various  thrilling  escapes  while  discharging 
his  arduous  and  ofttimes  dangerous  duties.  He  was  a  very  efficient  sheriff"  and 
succeeded  largely  in  suppressing  crime  and  in  driving  out  of  his  county  the  horse 
thieves  that  infested  it  in  the  early  years  of  his  incumbency  in  that  office.  For 
an  extended  period  he  was  actively  interested  in  the  agricultural  development  of 
his  county,  carefully  conducting  his  farming  interests  in  a  way  that  brought  to 
him  substantial  success.  In  fact,  he  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  for  good 
upon  the  history  of  his  county  in  many  ways.  He  died  in  the  year  1894  and  his 
death  was  deeply  regretted  by  all  who  knew  him.  His  VN^ife,  who  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Sarah  Meade,  was  a  native  of  New  England  and  they  reared  a  family 
of  four  daughters  and  one  son. 

R.  A.  Ellis  spent  his  youthful  days  in  Bremer  county,  obtaining  a  public- 
school  education  and  meeting  many  of  the  experiences  of  life  on  the  frontier. 
He  learned  the  plumber's  trade  and,  settling  in  Cedar  Falls,  continued  work  at 
his  trade  and  also  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council.  Fourteen  years  ago 
he  came  to  Waterloo  and  established  a  plumbing  business  under  the  firm  name 
of  Ellis  &  Foster,  which  has  continued  to  the  present  time.  He  has  been  very 
active  in  this  Hne  of  work,  his  business  keeping  pace  with  the  rapid  growth  of 
the  city,  which  he  has  seen  develop  from  a  comparatively  small  town  to  a  place 
of  more  than  thirty-five  thousand  inhabitants.  He  has  had  contracts  for  the 
plumbing  in  many^of  the  city's  best  buildings  and  is  now  installing  the  plumbing 


130  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

in  the  Thomas  A.  Edison  public-school  building  at  a  cost  of  twelve  thousand 
dollars.  This  is  indicative  of  his  prominent  position  in  the  field  of  business  to 
which  he  has  directed  his  energies.  His  patronage  is  very  extensive  and  his 
business  has  long  since  reached  large  and  gratifying  proportions.  He  is  also 
acting  as  president  and  secretary  of  the  Iowa  State  Master  Plumbers  Associa- 
tion. 

On  the  22d  of  September,  1890,  Mr.  EUis  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Mary  P'oster,  of  Bremer  county,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  three  children. 
Harry,  the  eldest,  was  educated  at  Cedar  Falls  and  at  Waterloo  and  is  now  man- 
ager of  the  Waterloo  Storage  Battery  Company.  Ruth,  who  was  graduated  from 
the  high  school  of  this  city,  is  now  a  student  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College. 
Helen  is  now  attending  the  West  Waterloo  high  school. 

The  parents  are  members  of  St.  Mark's  Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Ellis  has 
served  as  vestryman.  He  is  a  well  known  Mason,  holding  membership  in  the 
lodge,  chapter  and  council,  and  for  twenty-five  years  he  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  in  the  Waterloo  Club.  Outside  of  his  business  he  is  perhaps  best  known 
through  his  political  activity,  for  he  has  been  an  earnest  worker  in  the  ranks  of 
the  democratic  party  almost  from  the  time  when  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right 
of  franchise.  He  is  now  serving  for  the  second  term  as  alderman  at  large,  having 
been  called  to  that  office  by  appointment  to  fill  out  an  unexpired  term,  after  which 
he  was  elected  to  the  position.  He  exercises  his  official  prerogatives  in  support  of 
many  measures  and  plans  for  the  public  good  and  works  against  useless  expendi- 
ture of  the  public  funds,  yet  does  not  believe  in  barring  progress  by  parsimonious 
retrenchment.  Advancement  has  ever  been  his  watchword  and  it  characterizes 
his  public  duties  as  well  as  his  business  affairs.  He  now  has  an  attractive  home  in 
Waterloo  and  also  a  cottage  down  on  the  river  bank,  where  he  and  his  family 
spend  the  summer  months. 


E.  T.  SADLER. 


E.  T.  Sadler  is  editor  of  The  Milk  Trade  Journal  and  The  Creamery  Journal, 
published  at  Waterloo,  in  which  city  he  dates  his  residence  from  1900.  He  was 
born  in  Buchanan  county,  Iowa,  in  1883  and  was  educated  in  the  schools  of 
Hazleton,  Iowa,  and  in  the  West  high  school  of  Des  Moines,  supplemented  by  a 
course  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the 
class  of  1902.  He  then  became  associated  with  the  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company, 
with  \vhich  he  has  since  been  connected.  He  has  been  editor  of  The  Creamery 
Journal  for  six  years  and  of  The  Milk  Trade  Journal  since  the  publication  was 
started.  These  are  two  trade  papers  of  great  value  to  those  who  are  conducting 
business  along  the  lines  indicated.  The  papers  meet  every  requirement  of  the 
milk  producer,  giving  valuable  knowledge  concerning  methods  and  the  market. 
Mr.  Sadler  is  also  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Iowa  Milk  Dealers  Association 
and  is  treasurer  of  the  Iowa  State  Dairy  Association.  He  has  made  a  close  study 
of  everything  connected  with  the  production,  care  and  sale  of  milk  and  his  opin- 
ions are  largely  accepted  as  authority  upon  such  questions.     He  is  the  author 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  131 

of  a  well  known  song  and  one  very  popular  among  dairymen,  "Everybody  Milks 

in  Iowa." 

In  1909  Mr.  Sadler  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Nona  Ricker,  of  Sioux 
Falls,  South  Dakota,  and  they  have  a  daughter,  Shirley  Jane.  The  parents  are 
members  of  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Sadler  belongs  to  Helmet 
Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Club,  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  and  the  United  Commercial  Travelers. 
He  has  never  allowed  personal  interest  or  ambition  to  thwart  his  public  activities 
and  cooperates  in  many  measures  for  the  general  good.  Whether  in  pubhc  or 
private  connections  he  is  energetic  and  persistent  in  action,  swift  in  decision, 
quick  in  perception  and  stable  in  purpose. 


ASHLEY  ATWOOD  DUNHAM. 

When  the  machinery  of  public  service  is  kept  in  good  running  order  the 
average  citizen  does  not  stop  to  think  of  all  the  labor,  care,  foresight  and  execu- 
tive ability  which  this  involves,  but  such  qualities  are  just  as  indispensable  m 
the  management  of  public  utilities  as  in  the  control  of  individual  business  enter- 
prises. In  Ashley  Atwood  Dunham  Waterloo  has  a  chief  of  her  fire  department 
of  which  she  has  every  reason  to  be  proud,  for  he  has  made  an  excellent  record 
in  this  connection  from  the  old  days  of  a  volunteer  fire  department  until  the 
present  time  when  he  is  at  the  head  of  the  fire-fighting  forces  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Dunham  was  born  in  Canada  September  16,  1864,  and  there  resided  untd 
he  reached  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he 
learned  the  baker's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  three  years.  He  then  went  to 
Montana,  where  he  spent  two  and  a  half  years  working  in  the  mines.  Upon  his 
return  to  Waterloo  he  took  up  carpentering  and  was  identified  with  that  trade 
until  1895  when  he  engaged  in  the  grocery  business,  which  he  still  conducts  under 
the  firm  name  of  Dunham  cK:  Sohner.  Theirs  is  a  well  appointed  establishment, 
supplied  with  a  large  line  of  staple  and  fancy  groceries,  and  the  business  methods 
of  the  house  are  in  keeping  with  the  highest  standard  of  commercial  ethics.  A 
liberal  patronage  is  accorded  them  and  as  a  result  of  their  honorable  methods  and 
earnest  desire  to  please  their  patrons  their  business  is  growing  year  by  year. 

Mr  Dunham  was  the  last  chief  of  the  volunteer  fire  department  of  Waterloo, 
acting  in  that  capacity  from  1899  until  1904.  The  rapid  growth  ot  this  city 
seemed  to  make  it  imperative  that  a  pay  department  be  established,  wnich  was 
done  in  1904,  and  Mr.  Dunham  remained  as  chief.  He  knows  every  inch  ot 
ground  in  the  city  and  has  carefully  systematized  the  work  of  the  department, 
rendering  a  great  conflagration  almost  an  impossibility.  He  has  secured  the 
latest  improved  fire-fighting  apparatus  and  is  most  capable  in  directing  the  efforts 
of  his  men  when  their  services  are  called  upon. 

Mr.  Dunham  has  been  married  twice.  He  first  wedded  Matilda  Sohner,  who 
died  about  eleven  years  ago,  leaving  two  daughters,  Alice  and  Agnes.  Following 
the  demise  of  his  first  wife  Mr.  Dunham  wedded  her  sister,  Mary  Magdalene 
Sohner,  their  marriage  being  celebrated  in  1909. 


132  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Mr.  Dunham  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  of  the 
Fraternal  Union  and  the  Yeomen,  while  in  Masonry  he  has  attained  high  rank, 
being  connected  with  the  blue  lodge  and  also  with  the  chapter,  council,  com- 
mandery  and  Shrine.  A  resident  of  Waterloo  from  the  age  of  seventeen  years, 
he  is  widely  known  here  and  his  public  service  as  well  as  his  business  connections 
have  established  him  high  in  the  regard  of  his  fellow  townsmen,  who  entertain 
for  him  good-will  and  great  esteem. 


HIRAM  BROWN  HOXIE. 

Hiram  Brown  Hoxie  is  treasurer  of  the  Waterloo  Fruit  &  Commission  Com- 
pany, of  which  he  was  one  of  the  principal  organizers,  and  he  is  still  actively 
interested  in  the  business  although  he  has  now  reached  the  age  of  seventy-eight 
years.  Advanced  age,  however,  need  not  suggest  as  a  matter  of  course  idle- 
ness or  want  of  occupation,  for  when  one  has  wisely  used  his  time  and  his 
talents,  his  powers  increase  and  he  grows  stronger  mentally  and  morally  as  the 
years  go  on,  giving  out  of  the  rich  stores  of  his  wisdom  and  experience  for  the 
benefit  of  others.  Such  is  the  record  of  Mr.  Hoxie,  who  was  born  in  Cayuga 
county,  New  York,  November  25,  1836.  a  son  of  Jonathan  Johnson  and  Lydia 
(Brown)  Hoxie,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  state  of  New  York.  The 
father  was  born  in  Middletown,  August  2J,  18 10,  acquired  a  public-school  edu- 
cation and  afterward  engaged  in  teaching  in  the  schools  of  Canada.  He  served 
as  captain  in  the  state  militia.  He  devoted  his  early  life  to  the  business  of  a 
carpenter  and  contractor  but  afterward  became  a  merchant.  In  his  later  years 
he  and  his  wife  joined  their  son,  Hiram  Brown  Hoxie,  in  Waterloo,  where  the 
mother  passed  away  in  1887,  while  the  father,  surviving  for  twenty  years,  died  on 
the  I2th  of  March,  1907.  They  had  a  family  of  four  children,  of  whom  Hiram 
Brown  Hoxie  is  the  eldest.  Augusta  Elmina,  born  at  Summer  Hill,  Cayuga, 
county.  New  York,  August  i,  1840,  became  the  wife  of  Henry  Otis  Landphere 
and  resides  in  Cortland  county.  New  York.  Charles  Henry,  born  February  19, 
1844,  died  in  Waterloo  in  August,  1914,  survived  by  a  widow.  Ellen  Violetta, 
born  at  Summer  Hill,  New  York,  January  9,  1847,  Ijecame  the  wife  of  George 
S.  Brown  and  both  are  now  deceased. 

Hiram  Brown  Hoxie  was  reared  at  home  and  acquired  a  common-school 
education.  After  reaching  manhood  he  was  employed  for  some  years  in  his 
father's  store  in  Summer  Hill,  New  York,  and  afterward  became  identified  with 
the  lumber  business,  in  which  he  continued  actively  until  after  the  outbreak  of 
the  Civil  war.  His  patriotic  spirit  being  aroused  by  the  continued  attempt  of 
the  south  to  overthrow  the  Union,  he  put  aside  all  commercial  and  personal  con- 
siderations and  enlisted  as  a  member  of  Company  B,  Seventy-fifth  New  York 
Regiment.  In  1863  he  was  commissioned  a  lieutenant  of  Company  B,  Eighty- 
eighth  United  States  Colored  Infantry,  with  which  he  served  until  honorably 
discharged  in  the  fall  of  1864  following  the  consolidation  of  regiments. 

Mr.  Hoxie  then  returned  to  his  home  in  New  York  and  engaged  in  land 
speculation  and  in  the  purchase  and  sale  of  live  stock,  both  branches  of  his  busi- 
ness bringing  to  him  creditable  success ;  but  the  opportunities  of  the  middle  west 


Ed 


O 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COLXTY  135 

attracted  him  and  in  1868  he  made  his  way  to  Iowa,  porchasing  a  farm  in  Barclay 

tov»Tiship,  Black  Hawk  coimt\-.  The  land  was  wild  and  undeveloped  and  there 
were  no  improvements  upon  the  place  in  the  shape  of  buildings.  He  erected 
a  frame  house  sixteen  bj"  twenty-four  feet  with  a  kitchen  lean-to,  and  thereafter 
began  the  development  of  the  fields,  breaking  the  sod,  planting  the  crops  and  in 
due  time  gathering  good  harxests.  Year  after  year  he  continued  to  successfully 
cultivate  his  farm  until  Tanuarv-  1.  188S,  when  he  removed  to  \Vaterloo  to  ento" 
upon  the  duties  of  count}"  sheritt,  to  which  office  he  had  been  elected  in  the  fall 
of  1S87.  Lxjyalt}"  and  fidelity"  characterized  his  discharge  of  the  work  of  the 
office  and  he  made  such  a  creditable  record  during  his  first  term  that  he  was 
reelected  on  three  successive  occasions,  remaining  the  incumbent  in  that  office 
for  fotir  terms.  He  retired  from  the  position  as  he  had  altered  it — with  the 
confidence  and  good-will  of  all  concerned.  He  was  afterward  engaged  for  three 
years  in  foreclosing  mortgages,  selling  bankrupt  stocks  of  goods,  acting  as  receiver 
and  in  other  such  positions.  In  1S99  ^^  became  one  of  the  dominant  factors  in 
the  organization  of  the  Waterloo  Fniit  &  Commission  Company,  with  which  he 
\\-a5  actively  engaged  until  1912.  and  he  is  still  treasurer  of  the  company!  although 
he  has  largely  relegated  to  others  the  management  and  active  control  of  the 
business. 

In  1870.  at  Moimt  Carrt^  Illinois.  !Mr.  Hoxde  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Ruth  A.  Pierce,  who  was  bom  in  Lapeer.  Xew  Ycnk,  June  13,  1S44,  a 
daughter  of  Ezariah  and  Maigaret  ( Hilsinger  i  Pierce.  Her  grandfather, 
Xathaniel  Pierce,  was  bom  in  Pro\-idence.  Rhode  Island,  Mandi  2,  1783.  He 
was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  on  his  remo\-al  westward  settled  in  Cortland 
county.  Xew  York.  On  the  trip  he  was  accompanied  by  two  cousins:  William 
Saunders,  who  \\-as  the  author  of  a  series  of  spelling  books  and  readers  widely 
used  in  the  pubhc  schools;  and  Charles  Saunders,  who  afterward  b«3ime  an 
influential  member  of  the  bench  and  bar  of  Xew  York  city.  Xathaniel  Pierce 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Xancy  Harvey,  who  was  bom  Februar\-  25,  17SS.  and 
died  in  Cortland  count\-.  Xew  York. 

Elzariah  Pierce  \A-as  bom  in  Cortland  count)-.  Xew  York,  April  17.  181 1, 
acquired  a  common-school  education  and  was  reared  as  a  farm  boy.  Before  the 
era  of  railroad  building  in  central  Xew  York  he  bought  and  hauled  produce  to 
Xew  York  cit\-  and  upon  the  return  trips  would  take  back  a  load  of  merchandise. 
For  years  he  engaged  in  selling  ties  to  the  railroads,  also  supplying  cordwood, 
which  was  the  fuel  used  in  the  engines,  and  likewise  engaged  in  the  sale  of 
lumber.  He  wedded  Margaret  Hilsinger.  who  was  bom  in  Scholiarie  count>-, 
Xew  York,  and  \\-as  a  representative  of  one  of  the  early  Dutdi  famiUes  from 
Holland.  The  deadi  of  Elzariah  Pierce  occurred  in  Cortland  county,  Xew  York, 
in  1854,  and  his  wife  passed  away  in  the  same  count\\  February-  27.  1S60.  They 
were  sincere  and  consistent  members  of  the  Christian  church.  In  politics  Mr. 
Pierce  A\-as  a  whig  and  he  held  numerous  local  c^ces,  the  duties  of  which  he 
discharged  with  promptness  and  fidelity-.  In  their  family  were  two  childroi: 
Ambrose,  who  was  bom  in  184.O  and  died  in  early  manhood:  and  Mrs.  Hoxie, 

The  laner  was  bom  at  Lapeer.  Xew  York.  Tune  13.  1S44,  and  was  graduated 
from  a  pri\-ate  school  of  Marathon.  Xew  York,  known  as  the  Marathon  Academy. 
She  afterward  entered  the  Cazeno\-ia  Seminarv-  and  still  later  was  graduated 
from  the  Oswego   (X.  Y.)    Xormal  Training  school.     She  th«i  took  up  the 


136  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

profession  of  teaching  in  the  city  of  Oswego  and  was  connected  with  the  schools 
there  until  1870,  when  she  came  to  the  west  to  teach.  After  a  short  stay  at  the 
home  of  her  cousin,  Judge  Hilsinger,  in  Sabula,  Iowa,  she  became  the  wife  of 
Hiram  Brown  Hoxie.  For  a  brief  period  following  her  marriage  she  taught  in 
the  Normal  Institute  at  Iowa  Falls.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hoxie  have  been  born 
three  children :  Wirt  P.,  who  holds  the  office  of  county  attorney  in  Black  Hawk 
county;  Nellie  Ninon,  who  is  the  wife  of  Cecil  E.  Kell,  of  White  River,  South 
Dakota,  and  has  one  living  child,  Cecil  Edward,  who  was  born  in  White  River, 
July  8,  1914;  and  Ralph  J.,  the  secretary  and  manager  of  the  Waterloo  Fruit  & 
Commission  Company. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  Mr.  Hoxie  has  voted 
for  the  men  and  measures  of  the  republican  party.  Fraternally  he  is  connected 
with  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  also  the  Royal  Arch  chapter 
at  Waterloo.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club  and 
is  thus  active  in  the  movements  promulgated  for  the  benefit  of  the  city  and  the 
extension  of  its  trade  relations.  He  is  widely  and  favorably  known  throughout 
Black  Ha^vk  county,  where  he  has  now  lived  for  forty-six  years.  There  are 
few  phases  of  its  growth  and  development  with  which  he  is  not  familiar  and  at 
all  times  he  has  been  an  interested  witness  of  its  growth  and  advancement  and 
in  various  ways  has  contributed  to  the  upbuilding  of  this  section.  He  is  highly 
esteemed  and  his  warmest  friends  are  those  with  whom  he  has  long  been  asso- 
ciated— a  fact  which  indicates  that  his  career  is  one  which  wdll  bear  close 
investigation  and  scrutiny. 


SIDNEY  D.  SMITH,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Sidney  D.  Smith  is  one  of  the  successful  young  practitioners  of  medicine 
and  surgery  in  Waterloo  and  has  already  won  an  enviable  reputation  in  profes- 
sional circles  of  Black  Hawk  county.  His  birth  occurred  in  Watertown,  New 
York,  on  the  Sth  of  September,  1884,  his  parents  being  Stephen  R.  and  Jennie 
(Mendell)  Smith,  natives  of  Jefferson  county.  New  York.  Colonel  Sidney  J. 
Mendeil,  the  maternal  grandfather  of  our  subject,  held  the  rank  of  colonel  in 
the  Thirty-fifth  New  York  Regiment  during  the  period  of  the  Civil  war.  In 
1866  he  took  up  his  abode  among  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Franklin  county.  Iowa, 
where  he  continued  to  reside  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1909,  in  the 
eighty-seventh  year  of  his  age.  Stephen  R.  Smith,  an  agriculturist  by  occupa- 
tion, resided  on  his  farm  in  Jefferson  county.  New  York,  until  1907  and  since 
that  time  has  made  his  home  in  Rochester. 

Sidney  D.  Smith  obtained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  and  sub- 
sequently attended  L-nion  Academy  of  Belleville,  New  York,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  class  of  1903.  In  the  fall  of  1906  he  entered  Cornell  Medical 
College  and  in  1910.  after  two  years'  study  in  Ithaca  and  two  years'  instruction 
at  New  York  city,  won  the  degree  of  M.  D.  He  afterward  spent  a'oout  fifteen 
months  as  an  interne  in  the  J.  Hood  Wright  Hospital  in  New  York  and  on  the 
expiration  of  that  period  came  to  Iowa  on  a  visit._  Being  attracted  to  Waterloo 
and  believing  it  to  be  a  favorable  field  for  a  young  medical  practitioner,  he  opened 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  137 

an  office  and  has  since  remained  here,  having  built  up  an  extensive  and  lucrative 
practice.  He  has  recently  been  elected  coroner  of  Black  Hawk  coimty  and  in  that 
capacity  is  also  making  a  most  creditable  record. 

On  the  24th  of  June,  1914,  Dr.  Smith  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ruba 
M.  Christie,  of  New  York  city.  He  is  a  popular  member  of  the  Waterloo  City 
Medical  Society  and  is  identified  fraternally  with  the  following  organizations : 
Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P. ;  and 
Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  328,  L.  O.  M.  He  conforms  his  practice  to  the  highest 
professional  ethics  and  has  already  won  flattering  success  for  one  of  his  years. 


BURTON  E.  WILSON. 


Burton  E.  Wilson,  a  real-estate  and  insurance  agent  of  Waterloo,  in  which 
citv  he  has  made  his  home  for  eleven  years,  is  a  native  of  Illinois  but  has  been 
a  resident  of  Black  Hawk  county  through  four  decades.  His  father,  Samuel 
Wilson,  became  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  this  county  and  is  still  living  at 
Hudson  at  the  venerable  age  of  eighty-two  years.  He  was  born  in  Herkimer 
county.  New  York,  in  1832  and  in  early  manhood  wedded  Mary  A.  Sutton,  whose 
birth  occurred  in  Oswego  county,  New  York,  in  1835  and  who  is  also  yet  living. 
At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  he  became  a  member  of  Company  F,  Eighty-second 
Regiment  of  New  York  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  was  in  the  service  for  three 
years  and  four  months,  after  which  he  was  honorably  discharged  because  of 
physical  disability.  In  the  meantime,  however,  he  had  participated  in  a  number 
of  hotly  contested  engagements  and  had  proven  his  valor  and  loyalty  on  various 
battlefields.  Following  the  war  Mr.  Wilson  brought  his  family  to  the  middle 
west.  He  lived  for  a  time  in  Illinois  and  then  came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  where 
he  carried  on  general  farming. 

Burton  E.  Wilson,  brought  to  Iowa  during  his  early  boyhood,  was  reared 
in  Black  Hawk  county  and  acquired  his  education  in  its  public  schools  until  he 
left  the  Waterloo  high  school.  Later  he  entered  Til  ford  Academy  and  in  early 
manhood  taught  school  in  both  Black  Hawk  and  Benton  counties.  He  then 
turned  his  attention  to  general  farming  and  stock-raising  and  was  thus  closely 
associated  with  the  agricultural  interests  of  the  county  for  a  considerable  period, 
but  in  1903  left  the  farm  and  removed  to  Waterloo,  where  he  established  a 
real-estate  and  insurance  office  and  is  still  engaged  in  that  business  in  addition 
to  carrying  on  his  farming  interests.  He  has  largely  owned  the  real  estate  in 
which  he  has  dealt  in  Waterloo  and  Black  Hawk  county,  making  purchases  out- 
right rather  than  selling  on  commission.  Lie  is  likewise  greatly  interested  in 
western  lands.  Each  year  he  has  built  a  few  houses  in  Waterloo  for  sale  or 
rent  and  his  business  is  thus  proving  an  element  in  the  improvement  and  adorn- 
ment of  the  city.  He  also  conducts  a  general  business  in  all  branches  of  insur- 
ance and  the  policies  which  he  writes  represent  a  large  figure  annually.  He  like- 
wise has  other  business  connections.  Fie  is  financially  interested  in  still  other 
lines  which  contribute  to  his  individual  success  and  at  the  same  time  are  factors 
in  public  prosperity. 


138  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  1898  Mr.  Wilson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Celia  Glenny,  a  daughter 
of  Alexander  Glenny.  They  hold  membership  in  the  First  Congregational  church 
of  W^aterloo,  of  which  Mr.  Wilson  is  now  clerk.  He  belongs  to  the  Knights  of 
Pythias  and  Odd  Fellows  lodges,  the  Modern  Woodmen  camp  and  the  Sons  of 
\'eterans.  He  is  also  identified  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  with  the 
Waterloo  Club,  the  Town  Criers  Club  and  the  Waterloo  Traveling  &  r.usiness 
Men's  Association.  Flis  interests  and  activities  have  been  constantly  broadening 
in  their  scope  and  in  their  usefulness.  He  finds  time  for  all  of  the  duties  that 
devolve  upon  him  in  different  relations  and  in  connection  with  his  fellow  towns- 
men attempts  to  meet  the  public  needs  while  at  the  same  time  he  carefully  con- 
ducts his  business  affairs.  He  is  a  self-made  man  and  one  who  is  deserving  of 
much  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished,  for  personal  energy  and  industry 
have  been  the  foundation  upon  which  he  has  builded  his  success. 


HON.  HORACE  BOIES. 

Flon.  Horace  Boies  was  twice  governor  of  Iowa,  serving  as  chief  executive 
of  the  state  from  1890  until  1894.  lie  has  ])rol)ably  been  mentioned  more  fre- 
quently and  more  prominently  throughout  the  United  States  than  any  other 
resident  of  Iowa.  His  capabilities  naturally  qualify  him  for  leadership  and  upon 
the  history  of  the  commonwealth  he  has  left  an  indelible  impression,  his  efforts 
being  for  many  years  one  of  the  potent  elements  of  progress  and  improvement 
here.  He  was  born  in  Aurora,  Erie  county,  New  York,  December  7.  1827,  a 
son  of  Heber  and  Hattie  (Henshaw)  Boies.  The  father  was  a  farmer  in  moder- 
ate circumstances  and  was  a  soldier  of  the  War  of  1812.  He  was  descended  from 
French  ancestry,  the  family  name  being  originally  Du  Bois.  The  orthography, 
however,  was  changed  by  some  of  the  earlier  American  ancestors  to  its  present 
form.  The  first  of  the  family  who  came  to  this  country  was  David  Boies,  who 
settled  in  Blanford,  Massachusetts.  His  family  numbered  several  children,  one 
of  whom  was  Joel  I'oies,  grandfather  of  the  Hon.  Horace  Boies.  The  governor's 
mother  was  the  daughter  of  a  farmer  of  Fnglish  descent,  who  served  as  a  soldier 
in  the  Revolutionary  war. 

Horace  Boies  was  reared  in  the  usual  manner  of  farm  lads  to  the  age  of  six- 
teen years  and  after  reaching  the  age  of  ten  years  he  worked  on  the  home  farm 
in  the  summer  and  attended  the  district  schools  in  the  winter  seasons.  On  reach- 
ing the  age  of  sixteen  he  decided  to  start  out  in  the  world  in  order  to  make  his 
own  living  and,  leaving  his  home  in  the  Empire  state,  made  his  way  westward  to 
Wisconsin.  He  spent  four  years  in  southern  Wisconsin  and  northern  Illinois, 
working  as  a  farm  hand  through  the  summer  seasons  and  teaching  or  attending 
school  in  the  winter  months.  In  1847  ^^  returned  to  New  York  and  there  on  the 
TOth  of  May,  1848,  married  one  of  his  schoolmates.  Miss  Adella  King,  who  was 
then  nineteen  years  of  age.  Through  his  wife's  influence  he  entered  a  law  office, 
that  of  S.  S.  Clark,  of  Boston,  Erie  county.  New  York.  He  did  farm  work  and 
chores  to  pay  his  expenses  and  Mrs.  Boies  supported  herself  by  teaching  school. 
He  was  endowed  by  nature  with  strong  mentality  and  he  applied  himself  with 
such  thoroughness  to  the  mastery  of  legal  principles  that  at  the  end  of  two  years 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  139 

he  was  enabled  to  pass  the  required  examination  which  secured  him  admission 
to  the  bar.  He  then  engaged  in  general  practice  and  followed  his  profession  in 
or  near  Buffalo  and  throughout  the  surrounding  district  until  1867.  No  dreary 
novitiate  awaited  him.  His  powers  as  a  lawyer  were  soon  manifest  and  his  cli- 
entage steadily  increased.  He  became,  too,  a  recognized  leader  in  political  circles 
and  was  elected  to  the  lower  house  of  the  New  York  legislature. 

Mr.  Boies  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  wife  in  1855.  In  the 
spring  of  1857  he  visited  Waterloo,  Iowa,  and  again  in  the  winter  of  1857  ^^<^ 
1858.  It  was  during  that  winter  that  he  married  Versalia  M.  Barber,  a  daughter 
of  the  late  Dr.  Barber,  of  Waterloo,  and  in  the  spring  of  1867  he  came  to  this 
city  and  continued  in  practice  until  elected  governor.  He  was  one  of  the  most 
distinguished  members  of  the  Iowa  bar.  At  different  times  he  was  in  partner- 
ship with  H.  B.  Allen,  who  retired  at  length  on  account  of  failing  health;  with 
Judge  Couch,  who  was  elected  to  the  district  court;  and  James  L.  Husted,  who 
remained  with  him  until  Mr.  Boies  became  Iowa's  chief  executive.  In  the  mean- 
time his  sons,  E.  L.  Boies  and  Herbert  B.  Boies,  had  been  admitted  to  the  bar 
and  had  joined  the  firm,  which  later  became  known  as  Boies  &  Boies.  For  some 
time  after  the  governor's  retirement  from  office  he  gave  some  attention  to  his 
practice  but  spent  nmch  of  his  time  on  his  farm  in  Grundy  county.  The  later 
years  of  his  life  have  been  spent  there  and  in  southern  California,  where  he  is 
now  making  his  home. 

Governor  Boies  has  one  child  by  his  first  marriage,  now  Mrs.  John  ,Carson, 
of  Mount  \'ernon,  Iowa.  To  his  second  marriage  were  born  three  children : 
E.  L. ;  Jessie  B.,  who  died  January  i,  1894;  and  Herbert  B.,  of  Waterloo,  now 
serving  as  district  judge. 

Governor  Boies  has  never  belonged  to  any  church  or  society  other  than  the 
Good  Templars,  which  he  joined  in  his  boyhood  days.  He  was  the  first  democrat 
elected  governor  of  Iowa  after  1855  and  the  only  one  to  hold  that  otifice  in  over 
half  a  century.  It  is  a  credit  to  his  party  as  well  as  to  himself  that  he  was  one 
of  the  three  or  four  ablest  governors  the  state  ever  had.  It  has  been  the  simple 
weight  of  his  character  and  ability  that  has  carried  him  into  the  positions  of 
prominence  which  he  has  occupied.  As  a  lawyer  he  was  sound,  clear-minded  and 
well  trained.  The  limitations  which  are  imposed  by  the  constitution  on  federal 
powers  are  w^ell  understood  by  him.  With  the  long  line  of  decisions  from 
Marshall  down,  by  which  the  constitution  has  been  expounded,  he  is  familiar, 
as  are  all  thoroughly  skilled  lawyers.  He  is  at  home  in  all  departments  of  the 
law,  from  the  minutiae  of  practice  to  the  greater  topics  wherein  is  involved  the 
consideration  of  the  ethics  and  the  philosophy  of  jurisprudence  and  the  higher 
concerns  of  public  policy.  But  he  is  not  learned  in  the  law  alone,  for  he  has 
studied  long  and  carefully  the  subjects  that  are  to  the  statesman  and  the  man 
of  affairs  of  the  greatest  import — the  questions  of  finance,  political  economy, 
sociology — and  has  kept  abreast  of  the  best  thinking  men  of  the  age.  In  his 
practice  he  proved  felicitous  and  clear  in  argument,  thoroughly  in  earnest,  full  of 
the  vigor  of  conviction,  never  abusive  of  his  adversaries,  imbued  with  highest 
courtesy,  and  yet  a  foe  worthy  of  the  steel  of  the  most  able  opponent. 

That  he  was  reelected  governor  in  a  state  that  has  been  a  recognized  repub- 
lican stronghold  speaks  volumes  concerning  his  ability,  and  an  enumeration  of 
those  men  of  the  present  generation  who  have  won  honor  and  public  recognition 


140  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

for  themselves  and  at  the  same  time  have  honored  the  state  in  which  they  belong 
would  be  incomplete  were  there  failure  to  make  prominent  reference  to  Horace 
Boies,  who  held  distinctive  precedence  as  an  eminent  lawyer  and  statesman,  as 
a  man  of  marked  intellectual  attainments  and  one  who  conducted  himself  with 
signal  capability,  dignity  and  honor  in  the  highest  office  within  the  gift  of  the 
people  of  the  state,  winning  the  respect  of  all.  A  strong  mentality,  an  invincible 
courage,  a  most  determined  individuality  have  so  entered  into  his  makeup  as  to 
render  him  a  natural  leader  of  men  and  a  director  of  public  opinion.  His  influ- 
ence has  been  felt  not  only  in  Iowa  but  throughout  the  country,  for  his  views 
have  carried  weight  in  councils  where  the  best  thinking  men  of  the  nation  were 
assembled  for  the  discussion  of  vital  and  significant  problems. 


BENJAMIN  J.  RODAMAR. 

Benjamin  J.  Rodamar  is  now  livmg  retired  in  Waterloo  after  long,  close  and 
successful  connection  with  the  agricultural  interests  of  this  section  of  the  state. 
He  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  on  the  14th  of  April,  1869.  and  through  all  the 
intervening  years  has  been  a  loyal  and  valued  citizen  of  the  community.  Mis 
birth  occurred  in  Somerset  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1845  'irid  he  was  only  about 
eighteen  months  old  when  his  mother  died.  Through  the  period  of  his  boyhood 
and  youth  he  lived  with  different  people  and  he  learned  to  know  the  full  mean- 
ing of  the  question  "What  is  home  without  a  mother?'' 

It  was  in  March,  1868,  that  Mr.  Rodamar  made  arrangements  for  having  a 
home  of  his  own  in  his  marriage  to  Miss  Susan  hike,  also  a  native  of  Somerset 
county,  Pennsylvania.  A  year  later  he  started  for  the  west  with  his  young  bride 
in  search  of  a  favorable  location  and  on  the  14th  of  April,  1869,  they  arrived  in 
Black  Hawk  county,  where  they  have  since  resided,  [""or  a  time  ]\Ir.  Rodamar 
worked  by  the  day  at  driving  oxen  and  at  any  other  employment  which  he  could 
secure.  Thus  the  summer  passed  and  in  the  following  winter  he  secured  a  posi- 
tion as  teacher  of  a  school.  This  was  not  his  initial  experience  in  that  profession, 
for  he  had  already  taught  for  nine  years  in  Pennsylvania  and  was  principal  of  a 
school  at  Meyersdale,  Pennsylvania,  in  1867.  In  1870  Mr.  Rodamar  turned  his 
attention  to  farming,  ])urchasing  eighty  acres  of  land  in  Eagle  township.  The 
tract  was  entirely  destitute  of  improvements,  being  just  as  it  was  when  it  came 
from  the  hand  of  nature.  No  road  to  Waterloo  had  at  that  time  been  laid  out 
and  in  those  early  years  he  met  many  of  the  hardships  and  difficulties  incident  to 
pioneer  life.  At  that  early  period  when  he  wished  to  take  his  grain  to  market  he 
would  have  to  unload  his  wheat  and  carry  it  on  his  back  across  the  slough?  and 
then  get  the  wagon  and  oxen  across  and  reload.  Thus  he  would  go  on  until  he 
reached  the  town,  where  he  would  sell  ofttimes  at  a  very  low  price.  Many  were 
the  evidences  of  frontier  life  which  surrounded  him,  but  by  diligence  and  careful 
planning  Mr.  Rodamar  won  success  and  kept  adding  to  his  holdings  from  time 
to  time  until  within  the  boundaries  of  his  farm  were  comprised  four  hundred  and 
eighty  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land  which  he  brought  to  a  high  state  of 
cultivation. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  141 

Mr.  Rodamar  not  only  proved  a  capable  and  progressive  farmer  but  also 
became  an  active  factor  in  the  public  life  of  the  community  and  was  prominent 
in  the  councils  of  the  people  of  his  township,  who  honored  him  with  election  to 
the  office  of  county  supervisor,  in  which  position  he  served  for  a  number  of  years. 
He  was  also  auditor  of  the  county  for  nine  years  and  during  that  time  continued 
to  carry  on  the  work  of  the  farm,  although  he  made  his  home  in  the  city  while 
the  incumbent  in  the  office.  Following  his  retirement  from  official  position  he 
returned  to  the  farm  and  thereon  remained  until  19 lO,  when  he  disposed  of  his 
land  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  lived  retired,  enjoying 
the  fruits  of  his  former  toil. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rodamar  have  become  the  parents  of  nine  children  and  the 
record  is  a  most  notable  and  unusual  one  in  that  the  family  circle  yet  remains 
unbroken.  The  sons  and  daughters  are :  Henry  Ward,  who  is  now  engaged  in 
agricultural  pursuits  at  Hood  River,  Oregon;  Ira,  who  is  cashier  of  the  Leavitt 
&  Johnson  National  Bank  of  Waterloo  ;  Albert,  who  is  engaged  in  the  drug  busi- 
ness in  Baker  City,  Oregon;  Emma,  the  wife  of  John  Mericle,  who  is  conducting 
a  lumber  yard  at  Montevideo,  Minnesota ;  Grace,  the  head  bookkeeper  for  the 
Iowa  Manufacturers  Association,  Waterloo;  Lottie,  the  wife  of  William  Moss, 
who  is  engaged  in  fruit-raising  in  the  state  of  Washington  ;  Alta,  the  wife  of  Ira 
Blough,  cashier  of  the  Iowa  State  Bank  at  Waterloo;  Lillian,  also  in  the  Leavitt 
&  Johnson  National  I'ank.  Waterloo ;  and  Hortense,  who  is  a  teacher  in  Iowa 
Falls. 

Mr.  Rodamar  is  today  one  of  the  most  highly  respected  residents  of  Waterloo. 
He  has  made  his  home  in  the  county  for  forty-five  years  and  has  therefore  wit- 
nessed much  of  its  growth  and  development,  while  his  efiforts  have  been  an  ele- 
ment in  its  agricultural  progress.  He  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has 
accomplished  in  that  he  started  out  empty-handed  and  through  the  period  of  his 
youth  had  no  special  advantages  and  opportunities.  He  possessed  a  resolute 
purpose,  however,  and  the  years  have  brought  a  success  which  is  the  fitting  crown 
of  his  persistent,  earnest  labor. 


SIMON  J.  TEDFORD. 


Among  the  leaders  in  commercial  and  financial  circles  of  La  Porte  City  is 
Simon  J.  Tedford,  president  of  the  Union  State  Bank.  He  was  born  in  Preble 
county,  Ohio,  on  the  30th  of  April,  1851,  a  son  of  John  L.  and  Elizabeth  (Joh) 
Tedford,  natives  of  Ohio  and  West  X'irginia  respectively.  The  father  gained  a 
livelihood  for  himself  and  family  by  farming  and  cultivated  land  in  Ohio  until 
1853,  in  which  year  he  removed  to  Tama  county,  Iowa.  He  became  the  owner 
of  a  farm  there,  entering  the  same  from  the  government,  and  devoted  his  time  to 
agricultural  pursuits  until  he  retired  from  active  life.  For  five  years  before  his 
cleath  he  made  his  home  with  his  son  and  on  the  12th  of  January,  1902.  passed 
to  his  last  reward.  His  wife  had  preceded  him  many  years,  departing  this  life 
on  the  6th  of  April,  1876. 

Simon  J.  Tedford  was  but  an  infant  whep  his  parents  took  him  to  Tama 
county  and  there  he  passed  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth.     He  entered  the 


142  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

public  schools  at  the  usual  age  and  acquired  a  serviceable  education.  He 
remained  upon  the  farm  with  his  parents  until  he  was  twenty-five  years  of  age 
and  then  bought  eighty  acres  of  fine  land  in  Tama  county,  which  he  improved 
and  operated  for  two  years,  after  which  he  sold  out  and  removed  to  Kansas. 
He  remained  in  the  Sunflower  state  but  a  short  time,  however,  returning  to  Iowa 
and  buying  a  farm  in  Benton  county.  He  resided  upon  this  property  for  twelve 
years  and  made  many  improvements  upon  it  in  that  time.  His  next  removal  was 
to  La  Porte  City,  where  he  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  for  eight  years,  after 
which  he  retired.  He  has  since  resided  here,  enjoying  a  life  of  comparative 
leisure.  He  is  interested  in  a  number  of  business  and  financial*  concerns  in  the 
county  and  is  president  of  the  L^nion  State  Bank  of  La  Porte  City,  with  which  he 
has  been  connected  for  fourteen  years.  This  position  entails  upon  him  considera- 
ble responsibility  and  demands  quite  a  little  of  his  time,  but  he  is  so  constituted 
that  a  life  of  inactivity  and  idleness  would  be  distasteful  in  the  extreme.  He  is 
also  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company  of  Waterloo,  president 
of  the  La  Porte  City  Sewer  Company,  and  a  stockholder  and  director  in  the 
Farmers  Mutual  Insurance  Association,  which  has  its  headquarters  at  Waterloo, 
Iowa.  His  business  acumen  and  sound  judgment  have  been  of  great  value  in  the 
management  of  these  companies  and  his  advice  is  often  sought  by  those  who 
know  his  ability  to  counsel  wisely. 

On  the  2d  of  March,  1876,  Mr.  Tedford  was  married  to  Miss  Sylvia  V. 
Smith,  a  daughter  of  Isaac  and  Eleanor  (Marsh)  Smith.  Her  father  was  a 
native  of  New  York  but  at  an  early  day  removed  to  Michigan  and  farmed  there 
until  1854,  when  he  made  his  way  still  farther  west,  locating  in  Tama  county, 
Iowa.  He  bought  land  there  and  devoted  the  remainder  of  his  active  life  to  its 
cultivation.  He  passed  away  in  1874  and  the  demise  of  his  wife  occurred  in 
1904.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Tedford  have  been  born  three  children:  Belle  E.,  the 
wife  of  R.  H.  Gardner,  a  farmer  residing  in  Eagle  township,  this  county;  Maude, 
at  home;  and  Ora  I.,  the  wife  of  J.  W.  Kober,  who  is  engaged  in  the  clothing 
business  in  La  Porte  City. 

Mr.  Tedford  is  a  progressive  republican  and  at  the  polls  supports  the  policies 
in  which  he  believes.  He  has  served  upon  the  city  council  for  four  years  and 
for  several  years  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board.  There  are  many  in 
the  county  who  are  his  loyal  friends  and  those  who  have  known  him  most  inti- 
mately value  his  good  opinion  most  highly  and  his  character  is  of  such  sterling 
worth  that  it  is  most  appreciated  where  best  known. 


HOWARD  M.  SMITH. 


Howard  M.  Smith  is  general  superintendent  of  the  Citizens  Gas  &  Electric 
Company  of  Waterloo,  in  which  city  he  has  resided  for  three  and  one  half  years. 
His  birth  occurred  near  Nashua,  but  across  the  line  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  in 
1 881,  and  his  boyhood  days  were  spent  upon  a  farm  in  that  county,  where  he 
lived  until  he  had  attained  his  majority,  dividing  his  time  between  the  work  of  the 
fields,  the  duties  of  the  schoolroom  and  the  pleasures  of  the  playground.  At 
length  he  entered  the  Iowa  State  College  at  Ames  and  was  graduated  on  the 


HOWAED  M.  SMITH 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  145 

completion  of  a  course  in  electrical  engineering  with  the  class  of  1905.  Subse- 
quently he  spent  six  months  in  Hammond,  Indiana,  with  the  gas  company  of 
that  place  and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  went  to  Mobile,  Alabama,  where 
he  remained  for  four  and  one-half  years  with  a  gas  company.  On  severing  that 
connection  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Waterloo,  where  he  accepted  the  superin- 
tendency  of  the  gas  department  of  the  Citizens  Gas  &  Electric  Company.  Ability, 
however,  won  him  advancement  and  since  the  ist  of  January,  1914,  he  has  been 
general  superintendent  of  the  entire  plant. 

Waterloo  is  a  growing  western  city.  It  has  developed  rapidly  in  recent  years 
and  its  outlook  for  the  future  is  bright.  Among  the  organizations  which  have 
been  formed  to  advance  its  interests  and  upbuilding  are  the  Commercial  Club  and 
Board  of  Trade,  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  Waterloo  Club  and  the  Town 
Criers  Club,  with  all  of  which  Mr.  Smith  is  identified.  He  likes  to  be  in  touch 
with  those  hustling  activities  which  are  resultant  factors  in  the  public  welfare 
and  his  efforts  in  that  connection  have  been  far-reaching  and  beneficial. 

In  1907,  Mr.  Smith  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ethel  Cagley,  of  Nashua, 
and  to  them  has  been  born  a  daughter,  Dorothy  I.  The  parents  are  members  of 
the  Congregational  church  and  are  well  and  favorably  known  in  Waterloo,  having 
gained  many  warm  friends  during  the  comparatively  brief  period  of  their  residence 
here. 


BENJAMIN  J.  HOWREY. 

Benjamin  J.  Howrey  is  president  of  the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Company 
and  thus  figures  prominently  in  financial  circles.  No  matter  in  how  much  fantas- 
tic theorizing  one  may  indulge  as  to  the  cause  of  success,  careful  analysis  always 
indicates  that  it  is  the  outcome  of  persistent  purpose  intelligently  directed,  and 
such  has  been  the  case  with  Mr.  Howrey,  who  has  made  wise  use  of  his  time, 
talents  and  opportunities. 

He  is  a  native  son  of  Black  Hawk  county,  while  his  father,  J.  M.  Howrey,  was 
a  native  of  Ohio.  The  family  was  founded  in  Black  Hawk  county  during  the 
earliest  period  in  its  development  and  John  Howrey,  an  uncle  of  Benjamin  J. 
Howrey,  helped  build  the  first  log  cabin  erected  in  East  Waterloo.  From  that 
time  forward  the  family  name  has  been  closely  interwoven  with  the  history  of 
development  and  progress  in  this  section  of  the  state.  After  arriving  at  years 
of  maturity  J.  M.  Howrey  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Catherine  Winsett, 
a  daughter  of  Benjamin  Winsett,  one  of  the  prominent  pioneer  settlers  of  this 
county. 

Reared  under  the  parental  roof,  Benjamin  J.  Howrey  spent  his  boyhood  and 
youth  upon  the  home  farm  with  the  usual  experiences  that  come  to  the  country- 
bred  lad  who  divides  his  time  and  energies  between  the  work  of  the  fields,  the 
duties  of  the  schoolroom  and  the  pleasures  of  the  playground.  After  attending 
the  public  schools  and  graduating  from  the  high  school  of  Waterloo  with  the  class 
of  1888  he  became  a  student  in  Cornell  College  and  still  later  matriculated  in 
the  Iowa  State  University.  In  the  latter  institution  he  became  a  student  in  the 
law  department  and  also  continued  his  reading  with  the  law  firm  of  Boies,  Couch 

Vol.  II— 8 


146  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

&  Boies.  He  had  returned  from  Iowa  City  to  Waterloo  in  1892  and  for  five 
years  thereafter  he  devoted  much  time  to  school  teaching  and  at  the  same  time 
was  reading  law  with  the  firm  of  Boies,  Couch  &  Boies.  At  diflferent  periods  he 
was  a  teacher  in  the  rural  schools,  also  taught  in  both  high  schools  in  Waterloo 
and  in  the  college.  In  1897  he  successfully  passed  the  required  examination  that 
secured  his  admission  to  the  bar  and  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession, 
which  he  followed  in  Waterloo  for  about  eleven  years.  While  no  longer  giving 
any  attention  to  private  practice  he  still  retains  membership  in  both  the  county 
and  state  bar  associations  and  enters  into  the  discussions  relative  to  the  profes- 
sion. Mr.  Howrey  was  made  vice  president  of  the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust 
Company  in  igoS,  so  continuing  for  three  years,  during  which  period  he  looked 
after  considerable  legal  work  for  the  company.  In  191 1  he  became  president 
and  has  assumed  various  duties  from  time  to  time  until  he  is  now  the  directing 
head  and  active  manager  of  the  institution.  On  account  of  his  knowledge  of 
law  he  is  better  equipped  for  his  present  business  connections,  as  many  matters 
come  up  requiring  familiarity  with  legal  lore. 

In  1893  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Howrey  and  Miss  Ada  C.  McStay, 
of  Waterloo,  and  to  them  have  been  born  four  children:  Harold  M.,  Corinne  C, 
Benjamin  G.  and  Edward  F.  Mr.  Howrey  is  president  of  the  Commercial  Club 
and  Board  of  Trade  of  Waterloo.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers 
Club  and  belongs  to  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias  lodge. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Walnut  Street  Baptist  church,  has  served  for  a  long 
period  on  its  official  board  and  for  a  number  of  years  was  president  of  the  board. 
He  was  also  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school  for  ten  years  and  has  but 
recently  resigned  that  position.  He  is  thus  actively  interested  in  the  material, 
civic,  social  and  moral  progress  of  the  community,  and  his  efiforts  have  been 
attended  with  far-reaching  and  beneficial  results. 


ROYAL  A.  PERKINS. 


Royal  A.  Perkins,  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  La  Porte 
City,  is  esteemed  not  only  on  account  of  his  unquestioned  business  ability  but 
also  .because  of  his  force  of  character.  He  was  born  in  Ohio  on  the  nth  of 
September,  1840,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Cynthia  (  Pixley)  Perkins.  The  father 
was  a  native  of  New  Jersey  and  the  mother  of  Massachusetts,  but  for  many 
years  they  were  residents  of  Ohio  and  in  1866  they  removed  with  their  family 
to  Benton  county,  Iowa.  The  father  gave  his  active  life  to  the  cultivation  of 
the  soil  and  passed  away  in  1868,  being  survived  by  his  widow  until  1875. 

Royal  A.  Perkins  grew  to  manhood  in  Ohio  and  there  acquired  a  common- 
school  education.  Upon  accompanying  his  parents  to  Benton  county,  Iowa,  he 
purchased  land  there,  which  he  operated  and  improved  until  1891.  In  that  year 
he  gave  up  the  actual  work  of  the  farm  and  removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where 
he  has  since  resided.  For  fifteen  years  he  was  president  of  the  First  National 
Bank  and  proved  a  man  of  resource,  energy  and  good  judgment.  He  retired 
from  that  office  three  years  ago  but  is  an  extensive  stockholder  and  also  vice 
president  of  the  same  institution. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  147 

On  the  25tli  of  February,  1875,  Mr.  Perkins  was  married  to  Miss  Catherine 
Gingrich,  a  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Catherine  (Hofl'er)  Gingrich,  both  born  in 
Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania.  Her  father,  who  was  a  carpenter  by  trade 
but  also  farmed  in  the  Keystone  state,  died  there  in  1852,  and  her  mother  passed 
away  in  Iowa  in  1887. 

Mr.  Perkins  is  a  Presbyterian  in  religious  belief  and  politically  is  an  adherent 
of  the  republican  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  lodge  and  of  the  Eastern 
Star  and  exemplifies  in  his  life  the  spirit  of  helpfulness  inculcated  by  the  craft. 
He  is  a  stockholder  and  director  in  the  Electric  Light  &  Water  Company  of 
La  Porte  City  and  owns  his  fine  home  which  he  erected.  His  business  ability 
has  gained  him  the  respect  of  those  with  whom  he  has  had  dealings  and  they 
likewise  esteem  him  as  a  man  of  probity  and  honor. 


GEORGE  E.  EIGHTY. 


Various  business  and  manufacturing  interests  have  felt  the  stimulus  of  the 
cooperation  of  George  E.  Lichty,  a  man  of  sound  business  judgment  and 
undaunted  enterprise,  who  forms  his  plans  readily  and  is  determined  in  their 
execution.  He  is  well  known  as  the  president  of  the  Smith,  Lichty  &  Hillman 
Company  and  is  an  executive  officer  in  various  other  business  enterprises  of 
importance  which  have  contributed  much  to  the  substantial  development  and 
improvement  of  the  city.  For  forty-five  years  he  has  resided  in  Waterloo  and 
throughout  the  entire  period  has  enjoyed  an  unassailable  reputation  for  busi- 
ness integrity  as  well  as  enterprise. 

Mr.  Lichty  was  born  in  Somerset  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1857,  and  was  a 
youth  of  thirteen  years  when  in  1870  his  parents  came  with  their  family  to 
Waterloo.  His  education,  begun  in  the  schools  of  the  east,  was  continued  in  the 
pubHc  schools  of  this  city.  He  afterward  made  his  initial  step  in  the  business 
world  as  a  clerk  m  a  clothing  store  of  Waterloo,  m  which  he  was  employed  for 
two  years.  He  afterward  spent  five  years  in  a  grocery  store  and  on  the  ist  of 
October,  1879,  engaged  in  the  retail  grocery  business  on  his  own  account.  Suc- 
cess attended  the  venture  and  he  continued  actively  therein  until  the  fall  of  18S9, 
when  he  organized  the  Smith,  Lichty  &  Hillman  Wholesale  Grocery  Company, 
conducting  business  at  their  present  location  since  December,  1896.  This  has 
been  a  growing  enterprise.  They  have  advanced  steadily,  their  trade  reaching 
out  along  ramifying  lines  until  it  covers  a  broad  territory,  demanding  extensive 
shipments.  They  have  about  ninety  employes  in  the  Waterloo  establishment, 
with  about  twelve  traveling  salesmen  upon  the  road.  Mr.  Lichty  has  long  been 
the  executive  head  and  promoter  of  this  business  as  president  of  the  company 
and  yet,  important  as  has  been  his  work  in  this  connection,  it  by  no  means  limits 
the  extent  of  his  activities,  for  many  other  commercial  enterprises  have  benefited 
by  his  financial  support  and  by  his  wise  judgment,  if  not  by  direct  executive 
control.  He  is  now  the  president  of  the  Black  Hawk  Coffee  &  Spice  Company, 
president  of  the  Waterloo  Canning  Company,  one  of  the  vice  presidents  of  the 
Commercial  National  Bank,  president  of  the  Waterloo  Warehouse  &  Storage 
Company   and  president   of   the  Waterloo   Opera   House   &  Theatre   Company. 


148  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

This  gives  an  indication  of  the  range  and  breadth  of  his  activities  and  the  diver- 
sity of  his  interests  and  marks  him  as  one  of  the  foremost  business  men  of  the 
city. 

In  1881  Mr.  Lichty  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  Derrick,  of  Water- 
loo, and  unto  them  have  been  born  six  children :  Ben  R.,  who  is  associated  with 
his  father  in  business,  as  secretary  of  the  Smith,  Lichty  &  Hillman  Company ; 
Josephine,  the  wife  of  Fred  L.  Northey,  a  manufacturer  of  Waterloo ;  Burr  G., 
who  is  also  a  partner  of  his  father;  Jeanne,  the  wife  of  H.  W.  White,  of  Water- 
loo; Florence,  the  wife  of  Charles  A.  Stewart,  of  San  Francisco,  California;  and 
Robert  J.,  who  is  attending  school  at  Mercersburg,  Pennsylvania. 

Mr.  Lichty  takes  an  active  interest  in  politics  on  the  side  of  good  government, 
reform  and  progress.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  high  rank,  being  a  member 
of  the  Consistory,  in  which  he  has  reached  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish 
Rite.  He  also  has  membership  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks 
and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of 
Trade  and  was  one  of  the  incorporators  of  the  latter,  being  connected  therewith 
for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century.  His  position  in  business  circles  may  be 
judged  from  the  fact  that  he  was  honored  with  election  to  the  presidency  of  the 
National  Wholesale  Grocers  Association  for  the  year  191 2- 13.  This  indicates 
that  he  is  widely  known  among  representatives  of  that  line  of  business,  that  he 
is  popular  and  that  his  capability  is  recognized.  He  belongs  to  the  little  group 
of  distinctively  representative  business  men  who  have  been  pioneers  in  inaugu- 
rating and  building  up  the  chief  industries  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He 
early  had  the  sagacity  and  prescience  to  discern  the  eminence  which  the  future 
had  in  store  for  this  great  and  growing  region  and,  acting  in  accordance  with 
the  dictates  of  his  faith  and  judgment,  he  has  garnered  in  the  fullness  of  time  the 
generous  harvest  which  is  the  just  recompense  of  indomitable  industry,  spotless 
integrity  and  marvelous  enterprise. 


LOUIS  S.  CASS. 


A  well  known  figure  in  railway  circles  in  Iowa  is  Louis  S.  Cass,  who  since  the 
fall  of  1895  li^s  made  his  home  in  Waterloo  and  is  the  president  of  the  Waterloo, 
Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Company.  Opportunity  has  been  to  him  the 
open  door  through  which  he  has  entered  to  success.  He  has  never  over-estimated 
nor  undervalued  his  chances  but  has  made  wise  use  of  his  time  and  native  talents 
and  thus  step  by  step  has  progressed. 

Mr.  Cass  was  born  in  Vernon  county,  Wisconsin,  in  1865,  and  when  but  six 
months  old  was  brought  by  his  parents  to  Iowa,  the  family  home  being  estab- 
lished in  Bremer  county,  where  he  was  reared  to  manhood  upon  a  farm.  He 
acquired  his  education  in  the  schools  of  the  county  and  in  the  Sumner  high  school 
and  also  attended  the  Iowa  State  Teachers  College  at  Cedar  Falls  and  the  J.  F. 
Wallace  Commercial  College  of  La  Crosse,  Wisconsin.  For  some  time  he  was 
engaged  in  the  lumber  business  at  Sumner  and  from  the  outset  of  his  career  he 
has  steadily  advanced,  each  forward  step  bringing  him  a  broader  outlook  and 
wider  opportunities. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  ]49 

Mr.  Cass  became  connected  with  railway  interests  when  in  1883  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad  Company  as  tele- 
graph operator,  becoming  later  a  brakeman  on  a  freight  train.  He  was  con- 
nected with  the  Dubuque  &  Dakota  Railroad  for  some  time  and  later  engaged 
in  the  retail  lumber  business,  establishing,  owning  and  controlling  four  retail 
lumberyards  in  Iowa.  At  the  same  time  he  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  cedar 
shingles  on  the  Pacific  coast,  his  active  connection  with  the  lumber  business  con- 
tinuing from  1885  until  1895.  During  a  part  of  this  time  he  was  also  connected 
with  the  Minnesota  &  Northwestern  Railway  and  was  later  with  the  Chicago, 
St.  Paul  &  Kansas  City  Railroad  and  subsequently  with  the  Chicago  Great 
Western  Railway.  While  with  those  companies  he  acted  in  various  capacities. 
He  advanced  from  the  position  of  brakeman  to  station  agent  and  later  became 
train  conductor,  superintendent,  assistant  general  manager,  general  traffic  man- 
ager, vice  president  and  chief  executive  officer  to  the  receiver  and  signed  the 
papers  transferring  the  road  to  the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railroad  in  August, 

^909- 

In  the  meantime  Mr.  Cass  had  extended  his  efforts  to  other  lines  of  activity, 

having  in  1895  established  the  Waterloo  &  Cedar  Falls  Rapid  Transit  Railway. 
In  1896  he  extended  the  system  in  W^aterloo,  converted  the  horse-car  line  into 
an  electric  line  and  the  following  year  built  the  line  to  Cedar  Falls.  In  1898  he 
made  further  extensions  in  Waterloo  and  in  1899  purchased  the  Cedar  Falls  & 
Normal  Gasoline  Road,  which  was  operated  with  a  Patton  motor.  This  he 
converted  into  an  electric  line.  In  igoi  he  built  the  line  to  Denver,  Iowa,  and 
in  1902  extended  it  from  that  place  to  Denver  Junction  to  connect  with  the  Omaha 
division  of  the  Great  Western.  On  the  31st  of  August,  1909,  he  severed  his 
connection  with  the  Chicago  Great  Western  and  since  then  has  devoted  his  entire 
time  to  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railway,  successor  to  the  Waterloo 
&  Cedar  Falls  Rapid  Transit  Railway.  In  1910  he  extended  the  line  from  Denver 
Junction  to  Waverly  and  in  191 2  built  the  road  from  Waterloo  to  La  Porte 
City  and  the  following  year  from  La  Porte  City  to  Urbana,  while  in  1914  the 
circuit  was  completed  in  the  extension  of  the  line  from  Urbana  to  Cedar  Rapids. 
In  the  building  and  development  of  the  interurban  railway  system  Mr.  Cass  has 
contributed  in  large  measure  to  the  welfare  of  those  sections  through  which  the 
road  has  passed.  His  plans  have  been  carefully  formulated  and  promptly  exe- 
cuted and  in  all  of  his  business  career  he  has  readily  discriminated  between  the 
essential  and  the  nonessential. 

In  addition  to  his  other  interests  Mr.  Cass  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Commercial 
National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  in  the  Black  Hawk  National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  in 
the  Denver  Savings  Bank  of  Denver,  Iowa,  in  the  Bank  of  Sumner  at  Sumner, 
Iowa,  and  in  the  Tripoli  State  Bank  of  Tripoli,  Iowa ;  is  vice  president  of  the 
Iowa  Real  Estate  &  Investment  Company  of  Waterloo  and  vice  president  of 
the  Cass  Farm  Company,  having  two  thousand  acres  of  land  in  Bremer  county. 
These  connections  indicate  something  of  the  nature  and  range  of  his  interests 
and  of  the  busmess  ability  and  resourcefulness  which  enable  him  to  carefully 
direct  the  interests  of  so  many  different  important  concerns. 

Mr.  Cass  is  a  thirty-second  degree  Mason,  a  Knight  Templar  and  a  member 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  Benevolent  Protective 
Order  of  Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.     He  is  furthermore  connected  with 


150  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and 
the  Waterloo  Club.  His  pleasant  home  life  had  its  inception  in  1885,  in  his 
marriage  to  Miss  Lillian  Emmons,  of  Sumner,  and  they  have  become  the  par- 
ents of  two  children:  Zathoe  C,  the  wife  of  W.  H.  Burke,  auditor  and  treasurer 
of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Company ;  and  one  son  who 
died  in  infancy. 

Throughout  this  section  of  Iowa  Mr.  Cass  is  spoken  of  in  terms  of  admira- 
tion and  respect.  His  life  has  been  so  varied  in  its  activity,  so  honorable  in  its 
purposes,  so  far-reaching  and  beneficial  in  its  effects  that  it  has  become  an 
integral  part  of  the  history  of  Waterloo  and  has  also  left  an  impress  upon  the 
annals  of  the  state.  To  build  up  rather  than  to  destroy  has  ever  been  his  broad 
policy  and  he  attacks  everything  with  a  contagious  enthusiasm. 


J.  O.  TRUMBAUER. 


J.  O.  Trumbauer,  capitalist,  has  won  distinction  among  those  whose  ability 
has  gained  them  leadership  in  the  financial  circles  of  Black  Hawk  county  and  this 
section  of  the  state.  Centuries  ago  one  of  the  old  Greek  philosophers  said: 
"Earn  thy  reward:  the  gods  give  naught  to  sloth.''  Realizing  this  truth  at  the 
outset  of  his  career,  Mr.  Trumbauer  has  led  a  most  busy  life  and  his  enterprise 
and  diligence  have  placed  him  in  a  position  of  leadership  in  banking  circles,  for 
he  is  now  the  vice  president  of  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company  and  vice 
president  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank,  one  of  the  oldest  financial 
institutions  of  the  state. 

A  native  of  Berks  county,  Pennsylvania,  he  there  spent  the  early  years  of  his 
life,  coming  westward  to  Iowa  in  1879,  and  settling  at  Jesup,  Buchanan  county, 
where  he  spent  two  years  upon  a  farm.  He  was  afterward  connected  with 
J.  A.  Laird  of  Jesup,  one  of  the  pioneer  merchants  of  that  section,  for  about 
four  years  and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  went  to  the  west,  remaining  in 
different  sections  of  the  west  until  1890.  In  that  year  he  returned  to  Iowa,  set- 
tling at  Waterloo,  after  which  he  traveled  for  the  Fowler  Company  until  Febru- 
ary, 1909.  On  the  /th  of  January  of  that  year,  when  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust 
Company  was  organized  and  began  business,  he  became  its  vice  president  and 
has  since  been  thus  identified  with  the  corporation,  contributing  largely  to  its 
success  through  his  sound  judgment,  administrative  direction  and  executive  abil- 
ity. In  1910  he  was  chosen  vice  president  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National 
Bank  and  for  eight  years  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Waterloo.  He  is  also  the  vice  president  of  the  Marsh- 
Place  Company,  in  which  he  is  associated  with  C.  A.  Marsh,  A.  M.  Place,  F.  J. 
Fowler  and  H.  B.  Plumb.  This  company  erected  the  Marsh-Place  building,  a 
six-story  reinforced  concrete  fireproof  structure  at  the  corner  of  Sycamore  and 
Fifth  streets,  or  in  the  very  business  center  of  Waterloo,  and  it  brings  to  them 
a  very  substantial  income  in  its  rentals.  Mr.  Trumbauer  is  also  vice  president  of 
the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank  Building  Company  and  is  financially  inter- 
ested in  a  number  of  the  best  buildings  of  Waterloo  which  have  been  erected  for 
business  purposes.     The  company  is  now  erecting  a  fine  bank  building  sixty-five 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  151 

by  one  hundred  and  forty  feet  and  ten  stories  in  height.  The  foundation  has 
been  laid  of  this  structure,  which  will  be  the  finest  building  in  the  city,  of  steel 
construction,  fireproof  and  thoroughly  modern  in  every  particular.  It  will  be  the 
home  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank,  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Com- 
pany and  other  important  corporations  and  firms.  He  is  likewise  interested  in 
the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Company  and  the  First  National  Bank  Building 
Company.  He  has  ever  readily  recognized  opportunities  and  discriminated 
quickly  between  the  essential  and  the  non-essential,  and  with  the  passing  years 
his  field  of  usefulness  has  constantly  broadened  and  the  scope  of  his  activities 
has  covered  a  wider  range,  making  his  life  one  of  greater  usefulness. 

Mr.  Trumbauer  takes  an  active  interest  in  politics  as  a  good  citizen  but  not 
as  an  office  seeker,  and  his  hearty  cooperation  can  be  counted  upon  to  further  any 
movement  or  measure  for  the  public  good.  He  attends  the  First  Presbyterian 
church  and  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Benevolent  Protective 
Order  of  Elks.  In  the  latter  he  has  filled  all  of  the  chairs  and  is  a  past  exalted 
ruler.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers  Club  and  of  the  Commercial  Club 
and  is  actively  and  helpfully  interested  in  all  that  tends  to  the  upbuilding  of 
Waterloo,  his  efforts  being  an  element  in  making  this  in  many  ways  one  of  the 
best  cities  not  only  of  the  state  but  of  the  middle  west.  He  possesses  the  enter- 
prise which  has  been  the  dominant  factor  in  producing  the  wonderful  develop- 
ment of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  has  resolute  purpose,  courage  and 
industry  and  has  never  feared  to  venture  where  favoring  opportunity  has  led  the 
way,  and  his  record  has  demonstrated  the  truth  of  the  saying  that  success  is  not 
the  result  of  genius  or  of  environment  but  is  the  outcome  of  clear  judgment  and 
experience. 


GEORGE  F.  WILSON. 


George  F.  Wilson,  a  land  agent  at  Cedar  Falls,  conducting  an  extensive  busi- 
ness in  North  Dakota  properties,  was  born  April  6,  1864,  on  a  farm  ten  miles 
west  of  the  city  in  which  he  now  makes  his  home,  his  parents  being  Harrison  J.' 
and  Eliza  A.  (Collier)  Wilson,  the  former  a  native  of  Canada  and  the  latter 
of  Ogle  county,  Illinois.  The  father,  who  always  followed  farming  as  a  life 
work,  came  to  Iowa  in  the  early  '50s  and  settled  in  Grundy  county  on  land  which 
he  purchased  from  the  government.  It  was  entirely  destitute  of  improvements 
when  it  came  into  his  possession  but  with  characteristic  energy  he  at  once  began 
to  develop  the  fields  and  in  the  course  of  time  made  it  a  valuable  property.  Sub- 
sequently he  removed  to  another  farm  in  Fairfield  township,  Grundy  county,  and 
continued  to  make  his  home  in  that  county  until  his  death,  which  occurred  about 
the  year  1883.  His  widow  is  now  a  resident  of  Des  Moines.  Mr.  Wilson  was 
for  one  term  county  treasurer  of  Grundy  county  but  was  never  a  politician  in 
the  sense  of  ofifice  seeking. 

George  F.  Wilson  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  six  children 
and  upon  the  farm  in  Fairfield  township,  Grundy  county,  he  spent  the  period  of 
his  youth,  attending  the  public  schools  and  aiding  his  father  in  the  farm  work. 
At  the  time  when  his  father  became  ill  he  took  charge  of  the  old  homestead  and 


152  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

managed  the  work  of  developing  the  fields  until  his  father's  death  eight  months 
later.  He  afterward  continued  upon  the  homestead  for  two  years,  at  the  end  of 
which  time  an  older  brother,  Ira  J.  Wilson,  took  charge  of  the  farm  and  to  him 
George  F.  Wilson  sold  his  interests.  He  then  went  to  Bridgewater,  South  Dakota, 
in  1886,  seeking  to  improve  his  impaired  health  by  a  change  of  climate.  There 
he  again  engaged  in  farming  until  1891,  when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  the  town 
of  Bridgewater,  where  he  established  a  harness  business  and  later  engaged  in 
draying  and  in  the  livery  business.  He  sold  out  there  in  1893  ^"^  returned  to 
Iowa,  taking  up  his  abode  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  worked  at  the  carpenter's 
trade  with  his  brother,  who  was  a  building  contractor. 

In  February,  1894,  however,  ]\Ir.  Wilson  embarked  in  the  real-estate  business, 
handling  property  in  Cedar  Falls  and  its  vicinity.  He  also  established  an  insur- 
ance agency,  handling  both  fire  and  life  insurance  for  a  time,  but  afterward 
dropped  the  latter.  In  1905  he  homesteaded  in  Stark  county,  North  Dakota, 
where  he  resided  for  a  year  and  a  half,  receiving  the  title  to  his  land.  With 
the  exception  of  that  period  he  has  been  engaged  continuously  in  the  real-estate 
business  in  Cedar  Falls  during  the  past  twenty  years  and  now  handles  land  in 
Iowa,  }^Iinnesota  and  North  Dakota.  He  is  now  the  individual  owner  of  eight 
hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  in  North  Dakota  and  has  two  thousand  acres 
under  his  control.  He  devotes  his  entire  time  to  the  business  and  when  in  North 
Dakota  makes  his  headquarters  at  Bismarck.  He  has  the  greatest  possible  faith 
in  the  future  of  the  state  and  is  doing  much  through  colonization  for  its  develoj)- 
ment. 

On  the  6th  of  March,  1889,  Mr.  Wilson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Effie 
J.  Burgess,  a  native  of  Grundy  county  and  a  daughter  of  James  H.  and  ^Martha 
(Wilcox)  Burgess,  who  were  early  settlers  of  Fairfield  township,  that  county, 
but  both  are  now  deceased.  Four  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wil- 
son:  Clarke  L.  V'.,  who  is  attending  college  and  assists  his  father  in  business; 
Inez  F.,  who  is  also  acting  as  her  father's  assistant ;  and  Mina  B.  and  Roger  \'., 
both  in  school.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wilson  hold  membership  with  the  Tribe  of  Ben 
Hur  and  the  family  are  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  In  poli- 
tics Mr.  Wilson  is  a  progressive  republican.  He  keeps  well  informed  on  the 
questions  and  issues  of  the  day  and  is  ever  ready  to  support  his  position  by 
intelligent  argument,  but  does  not  seek  political  preferment,  as  his  time  is  fully 
occupied  with  his  business  affairs.  His  cooperation  has  been  felt  as  a  beneficial 
factor  in  movements  for  the  upbuilding  of  Cedar  Falls  as  w^ell  as  of  North 
Dakota. 


E.  A.  LEIGHTON. 


On  the  roster  of  public  officials  in  the  city  of  Waterloo  appears  the  name  of 
E.  A.  Leighton,  who  is  now  chief  of  police  and  as  such  is  a  stalwart  custodian  of 
the  public  peace,  doing  everything  in  his  power  to  promote  the  interests  of  the 
city  on  the  side  of  law  and  order.  He  was  bom  in  Osage,  Mitchell  county,  Iowa, 
in  1872  and  was  there  reared  and  educated,  passing  through  consecutive  grades  in 
the  public  schools  until  he  was  graduated  from  the  high  school.     He  afterward 


E.  A.  LEIGHTOX 


Tflft,   LfeNQk''- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  155 

entered  the  Iowa  State  College  at  Ames,  where  he  continued  his  studies,  and 
when  he  had  left  school  he  accepted  a  position  as  guard  in  the  Iowa  State  peni- 
tentiary, remaining  in  that  position  for  eight  years.  Later  he  spent  two  years  in 
Osage  and  in  1902  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  maintained  his  resi- 
dence. For  a  year  he  acted  as  foreman  for  the  Kemp  Manufacturing  Company  and 
at  the  end  of  that  time  became  a  member  of  the  Waterloo  police  department, 
serving  as  patrolman  for  six  years,  after  which  he  was  appointed  chief  of  the 
department  by  Mayor  Doty.  He  acted  in  that  capacity  for  two  years  and  then 
became  deputy  sheriff  of  Black  Hawk  county  for  two  years.  In  191 1  he  was  ap- 
pointed chief  of  police  by  Mayor  Thompson  and  he  is  now  serving  for  the  second 
term  in  that  office.  He  carefully  safeguards  the  interests  of  the  law-abiding  public 
and  has  prosecuted  crime  with  such  diligence  that  his  name  has  become  a  terror 
to  all  law  breakers. 

In  1894  Mr.  Leighton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Pegg,  of 
Osage,  Iowa,  and  they  have  one  son,  Russell  A.  The  family  attend  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Leighton  holds  membership  with  the  Masons,  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Moose.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Town  Criers 
Club.  Through  the  period  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo  he  has  become  widely  and 
favorably  known  and  he  possesses  attractive  social  qualities  which  render  him 
very  popular. 


JACOB  F.  HUPPEiiT. 


Jacob  F.  Huppert  is  a  representative  citizen  and  enterprising  agriculturist  of 
Black  Hawk  county,  residing  on  section  30,  Cedar  township.  His  birth  occurred 
in  Will  county,  Illinois,  on  the  21st  of  July,  1866,  his  parents  being  Jacob  and 
Susan  (  Templin)  Huppert,  the  former  a  native  of  Ohio  and  the  latter  of  Penn- 
sylvania. Jacob  Huppert  was  born  in  1843 — three  months  after  the  arrival  of 
his  parents  in  the  United  States.  In  an  early  day  he  accompanied  them  to 
Illinois,  in  which  state  he  followed  farming  for  seventeen  years,  on  the  expira- 
tion of  which  period  the  family  home  was  established  in  Benton  county,  Iowa. 
There  he  purchased  land  which  he  cultivated  successfullv  until  1898,  when  he 
came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  here  carrying  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  until 
called  to  his  final  rest  in  July,  1903.  His  widow  survives  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven 
years  and  keeps  house  for  her  son  Jacob.  To  them  were  born  ten  children,  as 
follows:  Jacob  F.,  of  this  review;  Henry  U.,  who  is  deceased;  Edwin  A.,  an 
agriculturist  of  Benton  county,  this  state;  Eldora,  who  is  the  wife  of  C.  D.  Brom 
and  resides  in  South  Dakota ;  Lizzie  A.,  who  gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to  W. 
L.  Palmer,  of  Tama  county,  Iowa;  L.  Elsworth,  living  in  British  Columbia; 
James  E.,  who  follows  farming  in  Benton  county,  this  state ;  Roy  E.,  a  resident 
of  Buchanan  county,  Iowa  ;  Zepha  E.,  who  is  the  wife  of  J.  W.  Morrison,  a 
farmer  of  Cedar  township,  this  county;  and  Alice,  who  is  the  wife  of  Robert 
Kerr,  living  in  Lincoln  township,  this  county. 

Jacob  F.  Huppert  was  three  years  of  age  when  his  parents  removed  to  Ben- 
ton county,  Iowa,  and  was  there  reared  and  educated.  He  remained  at  home 
until  he  had  attained  his  majority  and  subsequently  cultivated  rented  land  for 


156  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

six  years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  purchased  a  farm  of  two  hundred 
and  twelve  acres  in  Emmet  county,  Iowa.  He  operated  the  place  for  four  years 
and  then  lost  everything  because  of  crop  failure  and  the  attendant  hard  times. 
Returning  to  Benton  county,  he  there  continued  farming  for  a  year  and  at  the 
end  of  that  time  came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  operating  the  Hood  farm  for  three 
years.  Subsequently  he  spent  a  year  farming  in  Orange  township,  this  county, 
and  then  rented  the  Minnie  Cripper  farm  on  section  30,  Cedar  township,  which 
he  has  operated  continuously  and  successfully  for  the  past  twelve  years.  He 
owns  two  hundred  and  twenty-three  acres  of  land  in  [Missouri  and  is  widely 
recognized  as  one  of  the  enterprising  and  substantial  citizens  of  his  adopted 
county.  In  connection  with  the  cultivation  of  cereals  he  devotes  considerable 
attention  to  live  stock,  keeping  high  grade  shorthorn  and  Angus  cattle,  Duroc 
Jersey  and  Chester  White  hogs  and  fourteen  head  of  Percheron  horses. 

Mr.  Huppert  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and  has  recently  been 
elected  trustee  of  Cedar  township,  ably  servmg  in  that  position  at  the  present 
time.  He  had  been  previously  chosen  for  township  offices  but  did  not  qualify. 
His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  the  teachings  of  which 
he  exemplifies  in  his  daily  life,  and  in  his  home  community  he  enjoys  that  warm 
personal  friendship  and  kindly  esteem  which  are  always  given  in  recognition  of 
genuine  worth  in  the  individual. 


E.  L.  STOVER. 


E.  L.  Stover,  secretary  of  the  Dart  Motor  Truck  Company  of  Waterloo,  in 
which  city  he  has  maintained  his  home  through  the  past  decade,  was  born  in 
Hamilton  county,  Iowa,  in  1883,  a  son  of  Joseph  A.  Stover,  who  for  thirty-three 
years  was  a  resident  of  Hamilton  county  and  there  passed  away  in  1910,  at 
which  time  he  was  auditor  of  the  county.  He  always  took  an  active  interest 
in  politics  and  held  various  local  offices,  the  duties  of  which  he  discharged  with 
credit  to  himself  and  satisfaction  to  his  constituents.  Early  in  life  he  devoted 
his  time  and  energies  to  farming  and  later  was  for  a  number  of  years  engaged 
in  the  hardware  and  implement  business  at  Blairsburg,  Hamilton  county.  He 
was  afterward  called  to  public  office  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  the  county  lost 
one  of  its  trustworthy  officials  and  representative  citizens.  He  had  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Illinois  before  removing  to  Iowa.  His  widow,  who  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Bertha  U.  Smith,  survives  and  now  makes  her  home  in  Waterloo.  They 
were  the  parents  of  E.  L.  Stover. 

The  last  named  passed  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  his  native  county 
and  the  public-school  system  of  that  county  afforded  him  his  early  educational 
privileges,  which  were  supplemented,  however,  by  an  opportunity  to  attend 
Drake  University — an  opportunity  that  he  eagerly  embraced.  For  three  years 
he  engaged  in  teaching  school  in  his  native  county  and  for  two  years  engaged 
in  the  art  of  photography.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  accepted  a  position  in 
the  office  of  the  Litchfield  Manufacturing  Company  of  Waterloo,  Iowa,  with 
whom  he  remained  for  six  years.  He  afterward  spent  one  year  in  Omaha  and 
then  returned  to  Waterloo,  at  which  time  he  became  connected  with  the  Dart 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  157 

Manufacturing  Company  as  vice  president  and  secretary.  In  1914  that  company 
was  succeeded  by  the  Dart  Motor  Truck  Company,  which  was  incorporated  with 
a  capital  stock  of  six  hundred  thousand  dollars,  much  of  which  has  been  paid 
up.  The  present  officers  of  the  company  are:  C.  W.  Hellen,  president;  C.  C. 
Wolf,  of  Parkersburg,  treasurer;  and  E.  L.  Stover,  secretary.  In  this  connec- 
tion Mr.  Stover  is  bending  his  energies  to  administrative  direction  and  executive 
control.  He  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  business  and  is  thus 
qualified  to  direct  the  interests  of  the  company,  which  today  is  conducting  an 
extensive  and  growing  enterprise,  its  ramifying  trade  connections  already  cover- 
ing a  wide  territory.  Its  shipments  are  increasing  continuously  and  the  business 
is  now  one  of  the  profitable  productive  industries  of  Waterloo. 

In  1905  Mr.  Stover  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ruby  L.  De  France,  of 
Flamilton  county,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  three  children,  Claire  D., 
Evelyn  C.  and  Lois  A.  Mr.  Stover  is  connected  with  the  Knighfs  of  Pythias, 
the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees,  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  and 
the  Town  Criers  Club.  These  membership  relations,  as  well  as  his  business 
connections,  have  made  him  widely  known  in  Waterloo  and  his  salient  character- 
istics are  such  as  have  gained  for  him  the  warm  regard  and  good-will  of  all  with 
whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact. 


CLINTON  G.  HOLDEN. 

The  life  record  of  Clinton  G.  Holden  may  well  be  an  inspiration  to  others, 
for  it  indicates  what  may  be  accomplished  when  laudable  ambition  points  out 
the  way  and  energy  and  determination  constitute  the  salient  features  of  an  active 
career.  Mr.  Holden  is  the  vice  president  of  the  Horton-Holden  Hotel  Com- 
pany and  is  the  manager  of  the  Russell  Lamson  Hotel,  one  of  the  finest  hotels 
not  only  in  the  state  but  in  the  entire  country.  His  residence  in  Waterloo  covers 
only  a  year  and  a  half,  but  this  space  of  time  has  been  sufiicient  to  establish  him 
in  the  public  regard  as  a  progressive  business  man. 

A  native  of  Erie,  Pennsylvania,  he  was  born  in  1873  and  was  reared  in  that 
state,  its  public-school  system  afi^ording  him  his  educational  privileges.  He  has 
been  connected  with  hotel  life  for  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century.  He  made  his 
initial  step  in  that  direction  at  the  Reed  House  of  Erie,  and  afterward  became 
connected  with  the  Palace  Hotel  at  North  East,  Pennsylvania.  He  then  had 
twenty  years'  experience  in  connection  with  club  management,  being  for  four 
years  manager  of  the  University  Club  of  Cleveland,  Ohio,  and  for  three  and  a 
half  years  secretary  of  the  Union  Club  of  that  city.  On  the  expiration  of  that 
period  he  resigned  his  position  and  went  to  Chicago  to  become  manager  of  the 
University  Club  of  the  latter  city.  He  remained  in  that  capacity  for  five  and  a 
half  years  and  then  accepted  the  position  of  manager  of  the  Russell  Lamson 
Hotel  of  Waterloo.  He  has  now  directed  its  interests  for  a  year  and  a  half  and 
has  made  it  one  of  the  most  popular  hostelries  in  the  state.  Methods  employed 
in  the  largest  and  finest  city  hostelries  are  here  utilized  for  the  comfort  of  the 
guests  and  the  Russell  Lamson  Hotel  would  be  a  credit  to  a  city  many  times  the 
size  of  Waterloo.    Mr.  Holden  is  also  interested  in  several  other  business  under- 


158  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

takings,  being  now  the  vice  president  of  the  Mcintosh  Ranch  &  Orchard  of 
Derby,  Montana;  president  of  the  ElHs  Drug  Company  of  Waterloo;  and  presi- 
dent of  the  Iowa  Hotel  Keepers  Association.  His  life  has  been  an  active  one 
fraught  with  good  results,  and  his  business  affairs  have  met  with  merited  reward. 
Mr.  Holden  has  attained  high  rank  in  Masonry,  having  reached  the  thirty- 
second  degree  of  the  York  Rite.  He  was  very  promuient  in  Masonic  circles  in 
Cleveland  and  he  was  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  likewise  has  mem- 
bership with  the  Elks;  is  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  the  Water- 
loo Club  and  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  of  Waterloo :  the  Chi- 
cago Athletic  Club,  Chicago;  and  the  Masonic  Club  of  Cleveland.  He  was 
eagerly  welcomed  into  membership  in  the  Waterloo  organizations,  for  his  fame 
as  a  progressive,  enterprising  man  had  preceded  him.  Moreover,  it  took  but  a 
brief  time  to  convince  his  fellow  townsmen  of  his  worth  and  ability  and  to  recog- 
nize the  fact  that  he  is  the  possessor  of  many  well  developed  and  valuable  ideas 
having  to  do  with  business  progress  and  with  the  upbuilding  of  his  city. 


DAMD  M.  MITCHELL. 

David  M.  Mitchell  is  among  those  who  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  volun- 
teered to  fight  for  his  country  and  aid  in  the  preservation  of  the  Union.  He  is 
now  residing  in  La  Porte  City  and  has  an  interest  in  a  number  of  local  com- 
mercial and  industrial  concerns.  He  was  born  in  Maine,  in  December,  1845.  ^ 
son  of  Otis  and  Mehetabcl  (Preble)  Mitchell,  both  likewise  natives  of  the  Pine 
Tree  state.  The  father,  who  was  a  painter  and  decorator  by  trade,  removed 
from  Maine  to  Springfield,  Illinois,  at  an  early  date  in  the  history  of  the  Prairie 
state,  and  later  went  to  Mendota,  Illinois,  thence  to  Ottawa,  that  state,  and  sub- 
sequently to  Manchester,  Iowa.  He  resided  there  until  1855  ^'"^^  then  came  to 
La  Porte  City,  which  remained  his  home  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1888 
when  he  was  eighty-one  years  of  age.     His  wife  died  in  1872. 

David  M.  Mitchell  remained  at  home  with  his  parents  and  gained  a  good 
education  by  attending  the  public  schools.  He  completed  the  course  offered  in 
La  Porte  City  and  was  just  ready  to  enter  college  when  war  was  declared.  The 
need  of  the  nation  dwarfed  all  private  interests  and  in  1862  he  enlisted  in  the 
Eighteenth  Iowa  Infantry.  On  the  disbandment  of  that  organization  after  three 
months  he  reenlisted,  becoming  a  member  of  Company  D,  Thirty-first  Iowa 
Infantry.  He  served  for  three  years  with  the  latter  command  and  participated 
in  many  hard  fought  engagements,  including  the  siege  of  Yicksburg  and  the 
battle  of  Lookout  Mountain.  Being  exposed  to  all  kinds  of  weather  brought  on 
a  bone  disease  which  has  afflicted  him  since  1874.  After  being  mustered  out  at 
Davenport  in  1865  he  returned  to  La  Porte  City  and  worked  at  painting  and 
decorating,  as  he  had  iearned  that  trade  from  his  father.  However,  after  a 
few  years  he  was  compelled  to  give  up  an  active  life  and  since  1874  has  been  or> 
crutches.  Since  1874  he  has  resided  at  La  Porte  City  and  has  just  erected  a  fine 
modern  home  at  the  cost  of  eight  thousand  dollars.  He  also  owns  considerable 
other  property  here  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Union  State  Bank  and  a  stoclc- 
holder  and  director  in  the  Syndicate  block  of  La  Porte  City. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  159 

Mr.  Mitchell  was  married  in  1868  to  Miss  Lucy  Edsil,  a  daughter  of  Milkr 
and  Mary  (Bailey)  Edsil,  natives  of  Ohio  who  came  to  La  Porte  City  in  1865. 
Her  father  was  a  man  of  considerable  wealth  and  had  practically  retired  at  the 
time  of  his  arrival  here.  He  served  as  justice  of  the  peace  in  La  Porte  City  for 
many  years  and  was  well  known.  On  the  30th  of  October,  1883,  he  passed  to 
his  reward,  having  survived  his  wife  for  two  years,  her  demise  occurring  on 
the  9th  of  May,  1881.  Mrs.  Mitchell  was  an  invalid  for  many  years  and  her 
demise  occurred  in  1899.  By  her  marriage  to  our  subject  she  became  the  mother 
of  one  child,  Maude,  who  died  on  the  22d  of  March,  1869.  On  the  i8th  of 
September,  1904,  Mr.  Mitchell  married  Miss  Mary  J.  Krebs,  a  daughter  of 
Martin  and  Mary  C.  (Reichard)  Krebs,  natives  of  New  York  and  Germany, 
respectively.  Mr.  Krebs,  who  was  a  farmer,  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  at  an 
early  day  and  was  an  enterprising  and  successful  agriculturist  until  1899,  when 
he  retired  and  removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where  he  and  his  wife  now  reside. 

Mr.  Mitchell  is  a  Presbyterian  in  his  religious  affiliation  and  politically  sup- 
ports the  republican  party.  He  has  always  taken  a  great  interest  in  the  affairs 
of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic  and  organized  M.  F.  Thompson  Post,  No. 
187,  of  La  Porte  City.  He  still  holds  his  membership  therein  and  greatly  en- 
joys the  association  with  his  old  comrades  thus  made  possible.  In  the  many 
years  of  peace  that  have  intervened  since  the  close  of  the  Civil  war  he  has 
demonstrated  that  his  patriotism  has  not  lessened  and  his  public-spirited,  upright 
life  has  been  an  example  of  the  service  that  men  can  render  their  country  in 
times  when  there  is  no  special  stress  or  peril. 


W.  H.  BICKLEY,  M.  D. 

Dr.  \\\  H.  Bickley,  a  successful  practitioner  of  medicine  and  surgery  in 
Waterloo,  his  native  city,  was  born  in  1876,  a  son  of  E.  G.  Bickley,  a  well  known 
resident  of  Orange  township,  Black  Hawk  county.  His  birth  occurred  in  Mey- 
ersdale,  Pennsylvania,  and  with  his  parents  he  came  to  Iowa  in  1861,  the  family 
home  being  established  m  Orange  township.  He  was  a  son  of  E.  K.  Bickley, 
who  first  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  in  1855  and  entered  considerable  land  for 
himself  and  friends.  At  that  time  there  were  no  railroads  in  this  section  of  the 
state  and  they  had  to  drive  across  the  country  from  Chicago.  The  Bickley s  were 
farming  people  and  E.  K.  Bickley  was  also  a  bishop  of  the  Dunkard  church  in 
its  pioneer  days.  E.  G.  Bickley  was  largely  reared  upon  the  frontier  and  shared 
with  the  family  in  the  hardships  and  privations  which  fell  to  the  lot  of  the 
frontier  settlers.  It  was  in  this  county  that  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Arabelle  Shrock,  who  died  in  1901.  There  were  but  two  children  in  the  family, 
the  daughter  being  Alice  Bickley. 

The  son.  Dr.  W.  H.  Bickley,  was  reared  upon  the  home  farm  with  the  usual 
experiences  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  country-bred  boy.  He  worked  in  the 
fields  through  the  summer  months  and  in  the  winter  seasons  attended  the  district 
schools  for  some  time,  but  afterward  entered  the  high  school  of  West  Waterloo, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1894.  During  that  period  he 
continued  to  live  upon  the   farm,  driving  four  miles  to  and  from  school.     He 


160  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

afterward  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  which  he  followed  until  1896, 
but  regarded  that  merely  as  an  initial  step  to  other  professional  labor.  It  was 
his  desire  to  prepare  for  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  and  with  that  end 
in  view  he  became  a  student  in  the  medical  department  of  the  State  University 
of  Iowa,  in  which  he  pursued  his  studies  for  two  years.  He  next  entered  the 
New  York  Homeopathic  Medical  College  and  Hospital,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1900.  He  spent  the  succeeding  year  as  an  interne  in  the  Metropoli- 
tan Hospital  of  New  York  on  Blackwell's  Island  and  gained  broad  knowledge 
and  experience  such  as  comes  only  from  hospital  practice.  The  following  year 
was  spent  in  travel  throughout  the  United  States,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he 
returned  to  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  been  located.  In  19 12  he  went  abroad 
and  attended  clinics  in  Berlin,  Vienna  and  London  and  he  also  traveled  exten- 
sively over  the  European  continent.  He  had  the  opportunity  of  studying  the 
methods  of  some  of  the  most  eminent  physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  old  world 
and  his  ability  was  greatly  augmented  by  the  knowledge  which  he  gained  in 
attendance  at  the  European  clinics.  LTpon  his  return  he  resumed  the  private 
practice  of  his  profession  and  is  today  accounted  one  of  its  foremost  representa- 
tives in  Waterloo.  A  liberal  practice  is  accorded  him  and  his  efforts  have  been 
attended  with  substantial  success.  He  furthers  his  knowledge  through  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Waterloo,  Black  Hawk  County,  Iowa  State,  Austin  Flint  and 
Cedar  Valley  Medical  Societies  and  in  the  American  Medical  Association  and 
moreover  he  is  a  fellow  of  the  American  College  of  Surgeons.  He  has  been 
honored  with  the  presidency  of  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  a  fact  which 
indicates  his  high  standing  among  his  professional  brethren  in  the  city  in  which 
he  makes  his  home. 

In  1902  Dr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Beulah  \'ick,  of  St. 
Louis,  a  great-granddaughter  of  Newett  Vick,  who  w-as  the  founder  of  \'icks- 
burg,  Mississippi.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Bickley  have  one  child.  Robert  Crippen.  The 
parents  hold  membership  in  the  First  Brethren  church  and  Dr.  Bickley  also  be- 
longs to  the  Masonic  fraternity,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  Knights  Templar 
degree,  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  He  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  oldest  pioneer  families  of  the  county, 
represented  here  through  sixty  years,  and  the  work  for  material  and  moral 
progress  instituted  by  his  grandfather  and  continued  by  his  father  is  being  still 
further  carried  on  by  him.  He  is  a  public-spirited  and  progressive  citizen,  as 
well  as  an  able  physician  and  surgeon  and  has  won  for  himself  a  most  creditable 
place  in  public  regard. 


'     CLINTON  P.  SHOCKLEY. 

Clinton  P.  Shockley  is  a  leading  architect  of  Waterloo  and  many  of  the  fine 
structures  erected  in  this  city  in  recent  years  stand  as  monuments  to  his  profes- 
sional skill  and  ability.  Iowa  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having  oc- 
curred in  Vinton  in  1880.  There  he  remained  through  the  period  of  his  minority 
and  he  supplemented  the  knowledge  gained  in  the  grammar  schools  by  a  course 
in  the  high  school  of  Vinton.     He  then  went  to  Chicago,  where  he  entered  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  161 

Armour  Institute  of  Technology  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in 
1904.  He  then  returned  to  Iowa,  setthng  at  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  made 
his  home,  covering  a  period  of  more  than  ten  years.  His  natural  ability  was 
developed  through  his  study  and  he  is  continually  broadening  his  knowledge 
through  the  reading  of  architect's  journals,  through  experience  and  investigation. 
He  had  engaged  in  his  profession  for  only  a  brief  period  when  his  skill  and 
talent  were  recognized,  gaining  for  him  a  liberal  and  growing  patronage.  He 
has  been  the  architect  of  the  Manual  Training  high, school,  the  Walnut  Street 
Baptist  church  and  the  James  Black  building,  one  of  the  largest  buildings  in  the 
state,  in  which  he  has  offices  on  the  seventh  floor.  He  and  Mr.  Cleveland  were 
associated  in  making  the  plans  for  the  Iowa  building  for  the  Panama-Pacific 
Exposition  to  be  held  in  San  Francisco  in  191 5.  Going  to  that  city,  Mr.  Shock- 
ley  there  completed  the  plans  and  the  result. is  one  of  the  finest  state  buildings 
which  will  be  seen  upon  the  grounds  of  that  exposition.  He  has  been  the  archi- 
tect and  builder  of  numerous  commercial  houses  and  fine  residences,  including 
the  palatial  home  of  H.  L.  Litchfield,  on  Logan  avenue,  and  the  homes  of  Dr. 
Small,  Samuel  Pinkerton  and  Fred  L.  Worthey.  While  architecture  is  his  chief 
business,  Mr.  Shockley  is  also  connected  with  other  interests  and  enterprises, 
and  the  scope  of  his  activities  covers  a  broad  range. 

In  1909  Mr.  Shockley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jeanette  L.  Redfern, 
of  Galena,  Illinois,  and  they  have  one  child,  Pauline  Redfern.  Mr.  Shockley 
belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  the  Iowa  Chapter,  American  Institute 
of  Architects.  In  his  hours  of  leisure  he  is  invariably  a  most  congenial  and 
companionable  gentleman.  In  business  connections  he  is  alert  and  energetic, 
and  wide  study  and  experience  have  brought  him  to  a  position  among  the  lead- 
ing architects  of  the  state.  He  has  learned  to  wisely  use  his  time  and  improve 
his  opportunities  and  has  based  his  advancement  upon  an  intimate,  accurate 
knowledge  of  the  great  scientific  principles  which  underlie  his  chosen  life  work, 
as  well  as  of  the  practical  phases  of  the  business. 


LILLIE  A.  ARNETT,  M.  D. 

Dr.  LilHe  A.  Arnett,  successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  in 
Cedar  Falls,  her  duties  in  this  connection  being  discharged  with  a  high  sense  of 
conscientious  obligation,  is  a  native  of  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  and  a  daughter 
of  Phillip  Somers  and  Elizabeth  (Wagner)  Arnett.  The  father  is  also  a  native 
of  Whiteside  county  but  the  mother's  birth  occurred  in  Germany.  Mr.  Arnett 
has  ever  made  farming  his  life  work  and  has  spent  his  entire  life  in  Whiteside 
county,  living  yet  upon  the  old  homestead  upon  which  he  was  born  and  which 
his  father  had  purchased  from  the  government  in  pioneer  times.  As  the  years 
have  passed  on  he  has  bent  his  efforts  to  the  further  development  and  improve- 
ment of  the  property,  but  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  put  aside  all  business  and 
personal  considerations  and  joined  the  army  as  a  member  of  the  Ninth  Illinois 
Cavalry,  with  which  he  enlisted  as  a  private  of  Company  F  in  1864.  He  was 
mustered  out  the  following  year  and  then  returned  to  the  old  homestead,  which 


162  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

has  since  been  his  place  of  residence.  He  has  Hved  to  witness  many  changes  in 
the  county  of  his  nativity  and  has  always  borne  his  part  in  the  work  of  advance- 
ment and  improvement.  To  him  and  his  wife  were  born  ten  children,  two  of 
whom  are  deceased. 

Dr.  Arnett  was  the  third  in  order  of  birth.  After  attending  the  comitry 
schools  she  continued  her  education  in  the  schools  of  Geneseo.  Illinois,  and 
later  entered  the  State  University  of  Iowa  at  Iowa  City,  becoming  a  student  in 
the  regular  department  of  medicine.  She  has  since  done  post-graduate  work  in 
Chicago  and  has  always  kept  in  touch  with  the  advanced  thought  of  the  profes- 
sion. She  was  graduated  at  Iowa  City  with  the  class  of  1904  and  the  same  year 
began  practice  in  Cedar  Falls.  After  a  few  months,  however,  she  returned  to 
Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  where  she  followed  her  profession  for  about  three 
years.  The  succeeding  year  was  spent  in  study  and  in  rest,  after  which  she 
located  for  practice  at  Nemaha,  Iowa.  After  a  short  time,  however,  she  went 
to  Chicago,  where  she  took  up  post-graduate  work  and  in  19 10  she  came  to 
Cedar  Falls,  where  she  has  since  remained.  She  continues  in  the  general  prac- 
tice of  medicine  and  has  been  accorded  a  large  and  growing  patronage.  She 
devotes  her  entire  time  to  her  professional  duties  and  her  work  has  been  attended 
with  a  substantial  measure  of  success.  She  is  now  a  member  and  secretary  of 
the  Cedar  Falls  Medical  Society  and  at  one  time  was  president  of  that  organiza- 
tion. She  belongs  also  to  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  the  Iowa 
State  Medical  Society  and  the  American  Medical  Association. 

Dr.  Arnett  holds  membership  in  the  Eastern  Star.  She  is  also  connected  with 
the  Woman's  Club  and  is  much  interested  in  vital  civic  questions.  She  was  one 
of  the  fifteen  women  who  helped  to  incorporate  the  Hemenway  playground  in 
Cedar  Falls  and  she  has  done  much  for  the  benefit  and  interests  of  the  public 
along  various  lines.  Her  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Congregational  church  and 
as  one  of  its  members  she  takes  an  active  and  helpful  interest  in  its  various 
phases  of  work. 


CORTLANDT  FIELD  FOWLER. 

Cortlandt  Field  Fowler  is  the  president  of  the  Fowler  Company,  wholesale 
grocers  of  Waterloo,  and  is  practically  the  father  of  the  wholesale  interests  of 
the  city  in  that  he  was  the  pioneer  in  the  establishment  of  wholesale  enterprises 
here.  He  has  long  been  recognized  as  a  man  of  progressive  spirit  and  his  initiative 
has  been  a  strong  and  forceful  element  in  the  success  of  various  business  con- 
cerns with  which  he  is  connected  as  an  officer  or  director.  Opportunity  tauntingly 
plays  before  the  dreamer,  but  succumbs  to  the  efiforts  of  the  determined,  ener- 
getic man,  yielding  its  fruits  to  those  who  will  brook  no  obstacles.  It  has  been 
through  the  ready  recognition  and  wise  use  of  his  opportunities  that  Cortlandt 
F.  Fowler  has  advanced  to  the  position  of  prominence  which  he  now  occupies 
in  commercial  circles  of  central  Iowa.  He  dates  his  residence  in  Waterloo  from 
1869  and  in  all  the  intervening  years  has  been  a  factor  in  the  upbuilding  and 
progress  of  the  city  as  well  as  in  the  advancement  of  his  individual  interests. 


COETLANDT  F.  FOWLER 


r.  6 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  165 

A  native  of  New  York,  Mr.  Fowler  was  born  at  East  Henrietta,  Monroe 
county,  on  the  9th  of  June,  1845,  his  parents  being  Vincent  and  Rebecca  Fowler. 
He  began  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Hinckleyville  and  Adams  Basin  and 
afterward  attended  the  Parma  Institute  of  Parma,  New  York,  where  the  family 
lived.  His  father  was  a  miller  by  trade  and  followed  that  pursuit  in  various 
places,  his  last  mill  being  at  Hinckleyville,  a  mile  north  of  Adams  Basin,  New 
York.  He  followed  milling  from  boyhood  until  1857,  when  he  removed  to  a 
farm  on  the  noted  Ridge  road,  thirteen  miles  west  of  Rochester  and  two  miles 
west  of  Parma  Corners.  There  he  remained  for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  until 
he  removed  in  the  '80s  to  Spencerport,  New  York,  where  his  death  occurred  in 
191 1,  at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-one. 

While  the  family  resided  on  the  farm  Cortlandt  F.  Fowler  attended  an 
academy  through  the  winter  months,  while  the  summer  seasons  were  devoted  to 
the  work  of  the  fields.  When  about  seventeen  years  of  age  he  embarked  upon 
his  first  commercial  venture,  which  was  in  shipping  fruit  to  Boston  and  later 
down  the  Hudson  river,  and  although  but  a  youth  in  years  he  proved  his  capabil- 
ity as  a  factor  in  business  circles  by  the  competent  and  able  manner  in  which  he 
managed  his  afifairs.  He  was  twenty-three  years  of  age  when,  in  1868,  he  came 
to  the  west,  settling  in  Waterloo,  where  he  became  interested  in  the  nursery  busi- 
ness with  A.  T.  Lane,  thereby  becoming  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Lane  &  Fowler. 
In  August  of  the  same  year  he  returned  to  his  old  home  at  Parma,  New  York, 
and  there  in  April,  1869,  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Delphene  M.  Amadon. 

The  wedding  journey  of  the  young  couple  consisted  of  a  trip  to  Waterloo  and 
from  that  time  forward  Mr.  Fowler  has  been  closely  and  prominently  associated 
with  the  business  interests  and  development  of  the  city.  His  initial  step  toward 
the  wholesale  grocery  trade  was  of  a  most  fiurnble. character — the  sale  of  a  few 
barrels  of  vinegar  shipped  from  his  old  home  town:  Gradually  he  worked  into 
the  wholesale  grocery  business  and  today  is  president  of  the  Fowler  Company, 
which  controls  a  business  representing  an  investment  in  the  building  and  stock 
of  more  than  three  hundred  thousand  dollars.  He  had  made  considerable  progress 
along  business  lines  in  Waterloo  when  his  infant  son,  Martin  Vincent,  passed  away 
at  the  age  of  six  months.  It  is  said  that  troubles  never  come  singly  and  so  it 
seemed  with  Mr.  Fowler,  for  on  the  15th  of  April,  1872,  his  wife  passed  away. 
Leaving  his  business  affairs  in  the  care  of  his  brother,  George  V.  Fowler,  C.  F. 
Fowler  returned  to  his  old  home  in  New  York,  where  part  of  the  summer  season 
was  passed  in  a  much  needed  rest.  In  the  fall  of  that  year  he  again  took  up  his 
abode  in  Waterloo  and  has  since  been  at  the  head  of  the  wholesale  grocery  firm, 
the  business  of  which  has  developed  year  by  year  until  it  is  one  of  the  most  im- 
portant commercial  enterprises  of  the  state.  His  trade  interests  and  connections 
have  constantly  broadened  and  the  business  today  extends  over  a  wide  territory. 

Mr.  Fowler  has  ever  been  the  guiding  spirit  in  this  enterprise  and  in  demon- 
strating the  fact  that  a  wholesale  grocery  house  could  be  successfully  maintained 
and  developed  at  Waterloo  his  career  became  an  example  for  others  until  this 
city  is  today  an  important  wholesale  center.  Aside  from  his  interests  in  that 
business  Mr.  Fowler  is  a  director  of  the  Waterloo  &  Cedar  Falls  Union  Mills 
Company,  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  a  director  of  the 
Waterloo  Canning  Company  and  is  financially  or  officially  interested  in  various 
other  business  concerns  which  figure  prominently  in  the  upbuilding,  progress  and 

Vdl.  II— 9 


166  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

development  of  the  city.  He  has  made  extensive  and  judicious  investments  in  real 
estate  and  is  now  interested  in  four  business"  blocks  on  Lafayette  street  between 
Fourth  and  Fifth  streets. 

On  the  26th  of  February,  1880,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Fowler  and 
Miss  Julia  Clark,  the  daughter  of  a  prominent  farmer  of  Brockport,  New  York. 
After  a  happy  married  life  of  nineteen  years  Mrs.  Fowler  passed  away  March  13, 
1899,  her  death  resulting  from  an  operation  performed  in  St.  Luke's  Hospital, 
Chicago. 

There  is  no  resident  of  this  city  who  has  taken  a  deeper  or  more  sincere  in- 
terest in  its  upbuilding  and  development.  Whenever  a  project  has  been  promul- 
gated for  the  benefit  of  the  city  it  has  received  his  hearty  cooperation  and  support. 
He  was  largely  instrumental  in  developing  the  excellent  park  system  of  Waterloo, 
serving  for  an  extended  period  as  a  member  of  the  park  commission  board,  of 
which  he  was  chairman  for  six  or  eight  years.  He  is  a  member  of  Grace  Metho- 
dist Episcopal  church,  and  he  is  serving  on  the  official  board.  He  was  largely 
instrumental  in  securing  the  erection  of  the  new  church,  which  is  one  of  the 
finest  church  edifices  of  the  state,  and  he  was  the  largest  contributor  to  the  building 
fund.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade.  His  activi- 
ties have  touched  the  general  interests  of  society  in  many  ways  and  always  to 
the  benefit  and  advancement  of  the  community.  In  manner  he  is  pleasant,  genial 
and  courteous  and  he  is  known  as  a  most  charitable  man,  giving  generously  to 
those  in  need  and  to  benevolent  institutions.  His  personal  characteristics  have 
won  him  high  regard  and  there  is  no  more  popular  or  valued  citizen  in  all  Black 
Hawk  county  than  Cortlandt  F.  Fowler.  Moreover,  his  life  record  may  well 
serve  as  a  source  of  inspiration  and  encouragement  to  others,  showing  what  may 
be  accomplished  when  there  is  the  will  to  dare  and  to  do  and  standing  as  in- 
controvertible proof  of  the  fact  that  success  and  an  honored  name  may  be  won 
simultaneously. 


T.  O.  KNOX. 


J.  O.  Knox  is  the  president  and  manager  of  the  Waterloo  Register  Company 
and  has  other  commercial  connections  that  entitle  him  to  rank  with  the  leading 
business  men  of  the  city.  He  is  a  native  son  of  \\'aterloo,  born  in  1878.  His 
father.  Dr.  O.  S.  Knox,  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  about  1S66  and  engaged  in 
the  practice  of  medicine  here  for  a  number  of  years,  being  an  active  representa- 
tive of  the  profession  until  his  death.  His  wife  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Agnes 
Manson  and  to  them  were  born  two  children,  R.  M.  and  I.  O.,  twins.  The  former 
is  now  manager  of  the  Iowa  Spreader  &  Engine  Company  of  Waterloo. 

The  two  boys  were  reared  and  educated  in  Waterloo,  attending  the  public 
schools  and  afterward  becoming  students  in  the  Shattuck  Military  Academy  at 
Faribault,  Minnesota.  J.  O.  Knox  made  his  initial  step  in  the  business  world  as 
an  employe  of  the  Waterloo  Saddlery  Company  and  was  actively  connected  with 
that  business  for  nine  or  ten  years.  He  purchased  stock  in  the  enterprise  and 
is  still  financially  interested,  but  in  1904  he  directed  his  energies  toward  the 
upbuilding  of  the  Waterloo  Register  Company,  of  which  he  has  since  been  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  167 

president  and  manager,  with  F.  J.  Eighmey  as  secretary  and  treasurer  and  W. 
L.  Carter  as  vice  president  and  superintendent  of  the  plant.  They  engage  in 
the  manufacture  of  registers,  furnaces  and  furnace  supplies  and  their  business 
has  now  reached  extensive  and  gratifying  proportions.  Their  factory  comprises 
three  buildings  at  Nos.  110-112  Rath  street  and  they  employ  from  twenty  to 
twenty-five  workmen.  Mr.  Knox  is  also  interested  in  the  Iowa  Spreader  Cit 
Engine  Company.  The  progressive  policy  which  he  has  instituted  in  the  con- 
duct of  his  business  has  proven  substantially  resultant.  Excellence  of  work- 
manship and  durability  are  characteristics  of  the  output  and  honorable  business 
methods  have  won  for  the  house  an  enviable  reputation. 

In  1903  Mr.  Knox  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Florence  Clay,  of  Cedar 
Falls,  Iowa,  and  they  have  a  son,  John  Clay.  Mr.  Knox  holds  membership  in 
the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  he  belongs  also  to  the  Masonic 
lodge  and  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  exemplifying  in  his  life  the 
beneficent  spirit  on  which  those  organizations  rest.  He  is  well  known  in  Water- 
loo, where  his  entire  life  has  been  passed,  and  he  has  made  for  himself  a  credit- 
able position  in  business  circles.  He  had  no  special  advantages  at  the  outset  of 
his  career  but  he  recognized  the  fact  that  industry  and  energy^  are  a  sure  founda- 
tion upon  which  to  build  advancement  and  he  has  ever  employed  those  qualities 
in  the  attainment  of  success  and  the  creditable  position  in  business  circles  which 
is  now  accorded  him  by  the  consensus  of  public  opinion. 


L.   D.   MILLER. 


L.  D.  Miller  is  the  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Crystal  Ice  &  Fuel  Com- 
pany and  as  such  occupies  a  creditable  position  in  the  business  circles  of  Water- 
loo, in  which  city  he  has  made  his  home  for  a  quarter  of  a  century.  Attractive 
personal  qualities  as  well  as  business  enterprise  have  made  him  widely  and 
favorably  known  and  he  has  a  large  circle  of  w^arm  friends  here.  For  forty- 
six  years  he  has  lived  in  Black  Hawk  county,  being  but  an  infant  when  his 
parents  left  their  home  in  Cook  county,  Illinois,  where  he  was  born,  and  brought 
their  family  to  Black  Hawk  county.  He  is  a  son  of  Christ  and  Elizabeth  (Welter) 
Miller,  who  arrived  in  this  section  of  the  state  in  1867,  after  which  the  father 
was  for  many  years  actively  engaged  in  business  at  Gilbertville,  wh«re  he  passed 
away  several  years  ago.     His  wife  died  about  five  or  six  years  ago. 

L.  D.  Miller  was  reared  at  Gilbertville  and  was  employed  in  his  father's 
store  until  about  twenty  years  of  age,  when  he  came  to  Waterloo  and  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Smith,  Lichty  &  Hillman  Company,  wholesale  grocers,  with 
whom  he  was  connected  for  about  twenty  years.  He  entered  their  employ  as 
driver  of  one  of  the  wagons,  later  was  advanced  to  the  position  of  shipping  clerk, 
and  in  1893  went  upon  the  road  as  traveling  representative  of  the  house.  From 
the  beginning  he  thoroughly  mastered  every  task  assigned  to  him  and  thus  de- 
veloped the  power  and  ability  to  meet  the  increased  responsibilities  which  came 
with  promotion.  He  remained  with  the  firm  until  1906  and  then  after  twenty 
years'  connection  with  the  house  resigned,  to  the  deep  regret  of  his  employers. 
He  was,  however,  ambitious  to  engage  in  business  on  his  own  account  and  hav- 


168  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

ing  been,  in  1901,  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Waterloo  Ice  &  Fuel  Company, 
he  in  1906,  in  connection  with  J.  F.  Simpson,  bought  out  the  interests  of  the 
other  stockholders  in  the  concern.  The  business  had  been  reorganized  the  pre- 
vious year  under  the  name  of  the  Crystal  Ice  &  Fuel  Company  and  since  1907 
Mr.  Miller  has  been  the  secretary  and  treasurer.  This  business  now  has  a 
liberal  patronage,  its  annual  sales  of  both  ice  and  fuel  reaching  a  creditable  and 
gratifying  figure.  Aside  from  his  interests  therein  Mr.  Miller  is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Commercial  National  Bank  of  Waterloo. 

On  the  7th  of  June,  1893,  ^^^-  ^liHer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Helena 
Weber,  of  Fox  township,  Black  Hawk  county,  and  they  have  become  the  parents 
of  three  children :  Roger  C,  who  is  a  student  in  St.  Mary's  College  at  St. 
Marys,  Kansas ;  and  Celeste  and  Evelyn,  both  at  home. 

^Ir.  Miller  and  his  family  are  communicants  of  St.  Joseph's  Roman  Catholic 
church  and  he  holds  membership  in  die  Knights  of  Columbus,  the  Foresters  and 
the  Elks.  Diligence  and  determination  have  been  the  basic  elements  in  his  busi- 
ness career,  winning  for  him  the  success  which  he  now  enjoys.  Practically  his 
entire  life  has  been  spent  in  Black  Hawk  county,  where  he  is  well  known,  and 
the  twenty-five  years  of  his  residence  in  Waterloo  have  established  him  as  a 
resourceful,  enterprising  and  representative  business  man. 


THURMAN  D.  TEETER. 

Thurman  D.  Teeter,  a  worthy  native  son,  enterprising  citizen  and  represen- 
tative agriculturist  of  Black  Hawk  county,  now  owns  and  operates  an  excellent 
farm  embracing  one  hundred  and  sixty-eight  acres  on  section  17,  Spring  Creek 
township.  His  birth  occurred  in  that  township  on  the  21st  of  January,  1862, 
his  parents  being  Daniel  and  Emaline  (Clark)  Teeter,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Bedford  county,  Pennsylvania.  They  came  to  Iowa  in  1852  and  the 
father  taught  school  in  the  southern  part  of  the  state  until  the  following  year, 
when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Black  Hawk  county,  entering  and  improving  a 
quarter  section  of  land  in  Spring  Creek  township,  the  cultivation  of  which 
claimed  his  attention  throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life.  His  demise,  which 
occurred  January  13,  1903,  was  the  occasion  of  deep  and  widespread  regret,  for 
he  had  won  an  extensive  circle  of  warm  friends  throughout  the  community  which 
was  his  home  for  a  half  century.  His  widow,  who  is  now  eighty-three  years  of 
age  and  resides  in  Waterloo,  also  enjoys  an  extensive  and  favorable  acquaintance 
here. 

Thurman  D.  Teeter  was  reared  and  educated  in  this  county  and  remained 
under  the  parental  roof  until  twenty-two  years  of  age,  when  he  began  working  as 
a  farm  hand  for  others.  Subsequently  he  cultivated  rented  land  for  five  years 
and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  purchased  property  which  he  later  sold, 
then  buying  another  farm  of  which  he  also  disposed.  The  place  on  which  he 
now  resides  is  the  third  farm  which  has  been  in  his  possession  and  eml)races 
one  hundred  and  sixty-eight  acres  on  section  17,  Spring  Creek  township,  which 
he  has  operated  continuously  for  the  past  thirteen  years  and  has  brought  under 
a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  improvement.     He  likewise  owns  land  in  North 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  169 

Dakota  and  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers  Savings  Bank  of  La  Porte  City  and 
the  Farmers  Western  Land  Company  of  Waterloo.  His  interests  have  been 
carefully  directed  and  he  has  long  enjoyed  an  enviable  reputation  as  one  of 
the  prosperous  and  representative  citizens  of  his  native  county. 

On  the  5th  of  March,  1886,  Mr.  Teeter  was  united  in  marriage  to  ^liss 
Jennie  Broad,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Polly  ( Wells  j  Broad,  who  were  natives 
of  Kentucky  and  Ohio  respectively.  They  took  up  their  abode  among  the 
pioneer  settlers  of  Black  Hawk  county  in  the  "60s  and  here  the  father  carried 
on  farming  and  biacksmithing  until  his  demise  in  1891.  The  mother  survives 
and  makes  her  home  in  Spring  Creek  township.  ^Ir.  and  Mrs.  Teeter  are  the 
parents  of  two  children:  Ray  E.,  who  is  twenty-six  years  of  age  and  follows 
fanning  in  Spring  Creek  township ;  and  Glenn  C,  who  is  twenty  years  old  and 
resides  at  home. 

Mr.  Teeter  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy  and  for  ten  years 
has  ably  served  in  the  capacity  of  assessor,  still  holding  that  office  at  the  present 
time.  He  has  also  acted  as  secretary  of  the  school  board  for  the  past  eighteen 
years  and  was  elected  county  supervisor  from  the  fifth  district  November  3, 
1914.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Christian  church,  the  teachings  of  which 
he  exemplifies  in  his  daily  life.  He  has  remained  a  resident  of  Black  Hawk 
county  from  his  birth  to  the  present  time  and  in  its  progress  takes  an  active 
interest,  giving  his  hearty  support  from  time  to  time  to  movements  for  the  gen- 
eral welfare,  and  personally  he  has  always  commanded  and  held  the  confidence 
and  high  regard  of  all  who  are  associated  with  him. 


R.  C.  SINNARD. 


The  name  of  Sinnard  Brothers  is  respected  as  a  standard  for  enterprise  and 
progressiveness  in  connection  with  the  retail  grocery  trade  of  Waterloo,  for  this 
firm,  of  which  R.  C.  Sinnard  is  one  of  the  partners,  controls  the  leading  stores 
of  the  kind  in  the  city.  They  have  two  establishments,  one  at  No.  320  East 
Fourth  street  and  the  other  at  216  \\'est  Fourth  street.  For  fourteen  years  R. 
C.  Sinnard  has  been  a  resident  of  Waterloo  and  is  today  accounted  one  of  its 
foremost  merchants,  a  position  to  which  he  has  attained  through  his  own  etlorts 

and  ability. 

Iowa,  however,  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having  occurred  in 
Wapello  county  in  1877.  He  was  reared  ni  the  place  of  his  nativity  and  is  in- 
debted to  the  public-school  system  for  the  educational  advantages  which  he  en- 
joyed. On  leaving  ^^'apello  county  he  came  to  \\'aterloo  and  for  nine  years  was 
employed  in  the  grocery  store  of  Charles  Eighmey,  during  which  period  he 
gained  comprehensive  knowledge  of  every  phase  of  the  business  and  gradually 
worked  his  way  upward,  enjoying  the  full  confidence  of  his  employer.  He  was 
ambitious,  however,  to  engage  in  business  on  his  own  account  and  during  that 
period  he  carefully  saved  his  earnings  until  his  industry  and  economical  expendi- 
ture had  brought  him  sufficient  capital  to  enable  him  to  embark  in  business  on 
his  own  account.  Fie  joined  his  brother,  L.  P.  Sinnard,  in  organizing  the  present 
firm  of  Sinnard  Brothers  and  they  opened  a  grocery  store  on  East  Fifth  street, 


170  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

where  they  remained  until  July,  1913,  when  they  removed  to  320  East  Fourth 
street.  Success  attended  the  venture  from  the  beginning  and  in  191 2  they 
established  a  second  store  on  West  Fourth  street.  They  now  control  one  of  the 
most  extensive  retail  grocery  trades  of  Waterloo.  They  carry  everything  that 
can  be  included  in  a  line  of  staple  and  fancy  groceries  and  the  neat  and  attrac- 
tive arrangement  of  their  establishments,  their  thoroughly  reliable  business 
methods  and  earnest  efforts  to  please  their  patrons  have  secured  to  them  a  con- 
stantly growing  trade.  Mr.  Sinnard  is  a  member  of  the  Retail  Merchants  Asso- 
ciation and  cooperates  in  all  its  plans  for  the  promotion  of  business  conditions. 
In  November,  1904,  Mr.  Sinnard  w^as  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jessie  M. 
Gregg,  of  Cedar  Falls,  by  whom  he  has  two  children,  Edythe  Doris  and  Royal 
C.  Mr.  Sinnard  is  well  known  in  the  ranks  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the 
Yeomen.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  to 
the  Town  Criers  Club.  He  has  made  for  himself  a  creditable  place  and  name 
in  the  business  circles  of  Waterloo.  He  early  realized  that  if  one  would  win 
success,  they  must  be  willing  to  pay  the  price  of  self-sacrificing  effort,  of  in- 
defatigable energy  and  close  application.  He  has  wisely  employed  these  quali- 
ties and  ranks  today  among  the  foremost  retail  merchants  of  the  city.  He 
possesses,  too,  those  personal  traits  of  character  which  win  friendship  and  re- 
gard, and  goodwill  is  entertained  for  him  by  all  with  whom  he  has  come  in 
contact. 


MORTIMER  B.  CLEVELAND. 

Mortimer  B.  Cleveland,  a  well  known  and  successful  architect  of  Waterloo, 
although  his  practice  comes  to  him  from  a  wnde  territory,  was  born  in  Osage, 
Iowa,  on  the  19th  of  November,  1882,  a  son  of  Byron  M.  and  Lucia  B.  (Burn- 
ham)  Cleveland,  the  former  born  in  AVisconsin  in  1859  ^"fl  ^he  latter  in  Massa- 
chusetts, in  1863.  The  father  engaged  in  business  as  a  traveling  salesman  for 
twenty-seven  years.  When  a  young  man  he  came  to  Iowa,  settling  in  Waterloo, 
where  his  remaining  days  w^ere  passed,  his  death  occurring  on  the  6th  of  Febru- 
ary, 1912.  His  widow  still  resides  in  ^^'aterloo.  In  their  family  were  two 
children,  the  younger  being  Ruth  B.,  now  the  wife  of  S.  J.  Johnson,  of  B.lue 
Earth,  Minnesota. 

The  elder,  Mortimer  B.  Cleveland,  has  spent  practically  all  of  his  life  in 
Waterloo,  acquiring  a  public-school  education  until  he  had  completed  the  high- 
school  course,  after  which' he  entered  Cornell  College  at  Mount  A'ernon.  Iowa, 
and  later  the  University  of  Illinois,  from  which  he  holds  degrees.  He  had  made 
a  study  of  architecture  and  when  his  college  days  were  over  he  opened  an  office 
for  the  practice  of  his  profession  and  has  since  devoted  his  time  and  energies 
to  his  chosen  calling  and  gradually  has  buiit  up  a  large  business,  which  has  come 
to  him  from  a  broad  territory.  He  is  constantly  studying  along  the  line  of  his 
profession  and  experience  and  reading  are  bringing  to  him  a  large  knowledge 
by  which  his  patrons  benefit.  He  maintains  an  office  in  the  First  National  Bank 
building,   having  a   line   suite  of   rooms  on   the  third   floor,  and  one  conversing 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  171 

with  him  for  but  a  few  moments  must  recognize  at  once  that  he  has  compre- 
hensive knowledge  and  ability  in  the  field  of  his  chosen  calling. 

On  the  i8th  of  September,  1912,  Mr.  Cleveland  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Edith  M.  Munger,  a  native  of  Waterloo  and  a  daughter  of  Nelson  O.  and 
Alary  (Parmenter)  Munger.  The  mother  has  now  passed  away,  while  the 
father  is  living  retired  in  California. 

Mr.  Cleveland's  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  democratic  party  and  he 
keeps  well  informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  but  is  not  an  aspirant 
for  office.  He  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  290,  B.  P.  O.  E.,  and  to  the 
Order  of  Moose.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Along 
strictly  professional  lines  his  connections  are  with  the  Iowa  Chapter  of  the 
American  Institute  of  Architects  and  with  the  Architectural  League  of  America. 
A  deep  interest  in  and  love  for  his  profession  combined  with  laudable  ambition 
have  been  the  stimulating  forces  that  have  brought  him  to  his  present  enviable 
position  as  one  of  the  foremost  architects  of  northeastern  Iowa. 


W.  W.  SMITH. 


La  Porte  City  is  fortunate  in  having  as  its  mayor  W.  W.  Smith,  a  man  of 
undoubted  administrative  ability  and  of  unimpeachable  integrity.  He  is  a  native 
of  the  Empire  state,  born  in  May,  1843,  a  son  of  Isaac  and  Dollie  (Canfield) 
Smith,  who  were  likewise  born  in  New  York.  The  father  removed  with  his 
family  to  Tama  county,  Iowa,  in  1858  and  made  his  home  there  through  the 
remaining  years  of  his  life.  He  died  in  1872,  and  his  wife  passed  away  in  1854 
while  the  family  were  still  living  in  New  Y'ork. 

W.  W.  Smith  was  reared  upon  the  home  farm  and  as  soon  as  he  was  old 
enough  began  to  help  his  father  with  the  cultivation  of  the  fields  and  the  care 
of  the  live  stock,  and  thus  he  gained  a  practical  training  that  was  of  great  ad- 
vantage to  him  later  in  life.  Nor  was  his  formal  education  neglected,  as  he 
attended  the  common  schools  of  the  neighborhood.  When  eighteen  years  of 
age  his  patriotic  spirit  was  aroused  by  the  news  of  the  assault  on  Fort  Sumter 
and  the  attempt  of  the  southern  states  to  secede,  and  at  the  beginning  of  the 
war  he  enlisted  in  the  Union  army,  being  enrolled  as  a  member  of  Company  D, 
Thirty-first  Iowa  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  served  for  three  years  and  was  under 
fire  many  times,  taking  part  in  a  number  of  important  engagements.  At  the 
close  of  the  war  he  went  to  Benton  county,  Iowa,  and  purchased  eighty  acres  of 
land,  which  he  improved  and  developed.  He  gradually  increased  his  acreage 
until  he  became  the  owner  of  two  hundred  and  eighty  acres,  which  is  still  in  his 
possession  and  which  he  operated  until  1902.  In  that  year  he  rented  his  land 
and  removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where  he  has  since  resided.  He  immediately 
identified  himself  with  public  affairs  and  the  welfare  of  the  community  and  is 
now  serving  his  third  term  as  mayor  of  the  city,  his  record  being  indorsed  by 

reelection. 

In  December,  1867,  Mr.  Smith  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Estella  D. 
Marsh,  who  was  a  daughter  of  Jasper  and  Caroline  (Davis)  Marsh,  both  natives 
of  New  York.     In   i860  they  removed  to  Tama  county,  Iowa,  and  the  father 


172  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

operated  a  farm  there  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1868.  His  widow  lived 
many  years  longer,  dying  in  191 1.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Smith  were  born  five  chil- 
dren: O.  J.,  a  resident  of  Dysart,  Iowa;  Carrie,  the  wife  of  M.  M.  Hill,  of 
Hood  River,  Oregon;  W.  H.,  who  is  farming  the  homestead;  Alary,  who  died 
in  1912;  and  George  L.,  also  a  resident  of  Hood  River,  Oregon.  After  a  year's 
illness  Mrs.  Smith  died  in  1884  and  Mr.  Smith  was  married  to  Miss  Louisa  J. 
Johnson  in  April,.  1887.  To  this  union  have  been  born  two  children:  Leota, 
the  wife  of  \\'.  H.  Grove,  of  Montana;  and  Lloyd  J.,  who  is  at  home. 

Mr.  Smith  is  a  consistent  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  cooperates 
with  all  movements  seeking  the  moral  advancement  of  the  community.  He 
supports  the  republican  party  at  the  polls  and  is  quite  prominent  in  local  political 
circles.  He  belongs  to  M.  F.  Thompson  Post,  No.  187,  G.  A.  R.,  and  fraternally 
holds  membership  in  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  in  the  Ancient  Order  of  United 
Workmen.  Whether  engaged  as  an  agriculturist  or  devoting  his  time  as  a  public 
official  to  the  administration  of  the  city  government,  he  has  invariably  manifested 
the  qualities  of  energy,  initiative  and  sound  common  sense.  These  characteristics 
have  enabled  him  to  gain  success  and  to  win  the  confidence  of  his   fellowmen. 


ABRAHAM  WILD. 


Abraham  Wild  is  a  dealer  in  lumber,  coal  and  building  materials  in  Cedar 
Falls,  his  place  of  business  at  No.  1524  Main  street  being  conducted  under  the 
name  of  the  Wild  Lumber  Company.  He  was  born  in  Bavaria,  Germany,  March 
12,  1842,  and  in  accordance  with  the  laws  of  that  country  served  in  the  army  and 
participated  in  one  of  the  wars  in  which  the  fatherland  has  been  engaged.  He 
received  his  education  there  and  when  about  thirty  years  of  age,  attracted  by  the 
opportunities  of  the  new  world,  crossed  the  Atlantic  and  settled  in  Cedar  Falls, 
where  he  was  first  employed  in  a  brick  yard.  He  afterward  worked  for  nine 
years  in  a  lumber  yard  at  Cedar  Falls  and  this  gave  him  the  broad  practical  ex- 
perience which  has  served  as  a  foundation  upon  which  he  has  built  his  present 
success.  At  the  end  of  that  time,  or  in  1883,  he  established  a  yard  of  his  own  on 
Fourth  and  State  streets  and  operated  it  successfully  until  1908.  The  following 
year  he  opened  the  yard  which  he  is  now  conducting. 

Mr.  Wild  carries  a  large  line  of  building  materials  and  lumber  and  also  enjoys 
a  good  trade  as  a  coal  dealer.  His  reliable  business  methods  have  been  one  of 
the  strongest  factors  in  his  growing  success.  His  business  has  now  reached  ex- 
tensive proportions  and  his  prosperity  is  well  merited,  for  throughout  his  business 
career  to  upbuild  rather  than  to  destroy  has  ever  been  his  broad  policy.  He  is, 
moreover,  a  stockholder  in  the  Citizens  Bank  of  Cedar  Falls  and  in  the  broom 
factory,  and  is  president  of  the  Germania  Building,  Loan  &  Savings  Association. 
He  likewise  owns  a  number  of  fine  farms  in  various  counties  of  Iowa  and  also 
in  Minnesota  and  South  Dakota,  and  in  Cedar  Falls  he  owns  business  property, 
a  fine  residence  and  some  vacant  lots.  His  interests  have  constantly  broadened 
and  his  energy  and  determination  have  enabled  him  to  overcome  all  of  the  difii- 
culties  and  obstacles  in  his  path. 


ABRAHAM  WILD 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  175 

In  Germany,  about  forty-two  years  ago,  Mr.  Wild  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Katrina  Wild,  who  although  of  the  same  name  was  not  a  relative,  and  they 
came  to  the  new  world  on  their  wedding  journey.  They  are  the  parents  of  four 
children.  Matilda  A.,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  Normal  School  at  Cedar  Falls 
and  has  taught  school,  is  now  a  nurse  in  the  Presbyterian  Hospital.  Anna  R.,  a 
graduate  of  a  business  college  in  Cedar  Rapids,  has  taught  school  for  one  term  and 
for  fifteen  years  has  been  secretary  of  the  Normal  College  at  Cedar  Falls.  Fred 
Richard  H.,  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  New  York,  is  now  a  mechanical 
engineer  of  California.  Harry  B.,  who  was  educated  in  a  military  college  of 
Kentucky,  is  now  a  lumberman  of  Los  Angeles,  California.  The  children  were  all 
provided  with  liberal  educational  opportunities  and  have  become  valued  factors 
in  the  life  of  the  dififerent  communities  in  which  they  reside. 

Mr.  Wild  votes  with  the  republican  party,  which  he  has  supported  continuously 
since  becoming  a  naturalized  American  citizen.  He  has  never  had  occasion  to 
regret  his  determination  to  come  to  the  new  world.  He  was  guided  by  a  desire  to 
embrace  the  better  business  opportunities  offered  on  this  side  of  the  Atlantic,  nor 
did  he  have  any  false  ideas  that  a  fortune  was  to  be  had  for  the  asking.  He  knew 
that  industry  and  determination  must  win  success  here  as  elsewhere,  but  at  the 
time  of  his  arrival  competition  was  not  so  great.  Gradually  he  has  worked  his 
way  upward  and  is  now  controlling  a  profitable  business  which  has  won  him  rank 
with  the  substantial  residents  of  his  city. 


HENRY  BECKER. 


Henry  Becker,  who  is  living  in  honorable  retirement  at  La  Porte  City,  de- 
voted his  attention  to  general  agricultural  pursuits  throughout  his  active  business 
career  with  excellent  results.  His  birth  occurred  m  eastern  Pennsylvania  on 
the  8th  of  May,  1838,  his  parents  being  John  and  Rebecca  (Zimmerman)  Becker, 
who  were  likewise  natives  of  the  Keystone  state.  The  father,  who  spent  his 
entire  life  in  Pennsylvania  and  followed  farming  throughout  his  active  business 
career,  passed  away  in  1874,  while  his  wife  died  in  that  state  in  1852. 

Henry  Becker  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  state  of  his  nativity  and  re- 
mained under  the  parental  roof  until  twenty-five  years  of  age.  He  then  made 
his  way  to  Will  county,  Illinois,  where  he  was  first  employed  as  a  farm  hand 
and  subsequently  rented  a  tract  of  land  which  he  cultivated  until  1871.  In  that 
year  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  and  here  operated  a  rented  farm  tor  two 
years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land  in 
Bruce  township,  Benton  county,  Iowa,  improving  the  property  and  there  carry- 
ing on  farming  for  four  years.  His  first  wife  died  on  that  place  and  he  was 
married  again,  afterward  removing  to  the  two-hundred-acre  farm  of  his  second 
wife  in  Black  Hawk  county.  He  was  actively  engaged  in  the  operation  of  that 
tract  until  1890  and  then  retired  with  a  comfortable  competence,  taking  up  his 
abode  in  La  Porte  City,  where  he  has  made  his  home  continuously  since  with 
the  exception  of  seven  years  spent  in  Arkansas.  He  owns  a  handsome  residence 
and  has  erected  and  sold  five  houses  in  La  Porte  City. 


176  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  November,  1865,  Mr.  Becker  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Mary  A. 
Brown,  her  father  being  John  Brown,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of 
Will  county,  Illinois.  She  passed  away  in  1875  and  in  July  of  the  following  year 
Mr.  Becker  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Mrs.  Sarah  E.  Foulk, 
a  daughter  of  John  Reed,  who  was  a  pioneer  settler  of  Pennsylvania. 

Mr.  Becker  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and  has  served  as  a  member 
of  the  school  board,  the  cause  of  education  ever  finding  in  him  a  stalwart  cham- 
pion. His  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Church  of  Zion, 
while  his  wife  is  a  Christian  Scientist.  His  life  has  been  well  spent,  in  harmony 
with  his  professions,  and  in  every  relation  he  has  been  honorable  and  upright, 
winning  for  himself  the  warm  regard  of  his  fellow  citizens. 


GEORGE  V.  FOWLER. 


George  V.  Fowler  has  been  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  in  Waterloo 
through  an  extended  period  and  his  success  is  the  legitimate  outcome  of  close 
application,  earnest  purpose  and  honorable  dealing.  He  was  born  in  Pittsford, 
Monroe  county,  New  York,  March  18,  1847,  ^"d  is  a  son  of  Vincent  and 
Rebecca  A.  (Field)  Fowler.  The  birthplace  of  both  the  father  and  mother  was 
Peekskill,  upon  the  banks  of  the  Hudson  in  the  state  of  New  York.  In  early 
life  Vincent  Fowler  learned  and  followed  the  miller's  trade.  From  Pittsford  he 
removed  to  Hinckley,  New  York,  where  he  followed  milling  for  five  years  and 
then  located  on  a  farm  near  Spencerport.  New  York,  where  he  remained  until 
his  death,  which  occurred  in  191 1,  having  for  about  three  years  survived  his 
wife.     His  father  was  a  blacksmith  and  made  swords  for  General  Washington. 

George  V.  Fowler  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  five  chil- 
dren. He  attended  the  district  schools  of  his  native  state  until  about  fifteen 
years  of  age  and  afterward  spent  three  or  four  years  in  a  select  school  con- 
ducted by  Professor  Clark,  the  author  of  the  well  known  ''Clark's  Grammar." 
When  eighteen  years  of  age  he  began  operating  his  father's  farm  on  shares  and 
continued  upon  the  old  homestead  for  eight  years.  Before  leaving  the  farm 
he  and  his  older  brother  had  embarked  in  the  nursery  business  at  Waterloo, 
Iowa,  the  brother  conducting  the  business  at  this  point,  while  George  V.  Fowler 
remained  in  charge  of  the  home  farm  in  New  York.  He  left  the  Empire  state, 
however,  in  1873  and  came  to  Waterloo  to  become  a  factor  in  the  active  man- 
agement of  the  nursery  business,  in  which  he  remained  for  about  ten  years. 
Gradually,  however,  he  withdrew  from  active  connection  with  that  interest  and 
confined  his  attention  more  and  more  largely  to  the  wholesale  fruit  and  grocery 
l)usiness,  that  undertaking  having  its  inception  in  his  shipping  fruits  and  pure 
cider  vinegar  from  New  York.  Eventually  he  gave  practically  all  of  his  atten- 
tion to  the  grocery  trade.  He  still  owns,  however,  a  farm  which  is  cultivated 
under  his  supervision  and  he  has  extensive  interests  in  real  estate,  owning  a 
large  amount  of  land  in  Waterloo  Fleights.  He  is  likewise  connected  with  the 
Waterloo  Canning  Company,  the  Rath  Packing  Company,  the  Union  Mill  Com- 
pany and  the  First  National  Bank,  in  all  of  which  he  is  a  stockholder.  His  busi- 
ness interests  are  thus  large  and  important  and  he  has  become  a  foremost  factor 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  177 

in  commercial,  indpstrial  and  financial  circles  in  Waterloo.  He  has  likewise  been 
a  stockholder  in  the  Waterloo  Chautauqua  Association  since  its  inception  more 
than  twenty-five  years  ago.  His  property  holdings  in  Waterloo  are  very  exten- 
sive, for  in  connection  with  his  two  brothers  he  owns  a  number  of  the  principal 
business  blocks  of  the  city.  His  investments  in  realty  have  been  most  judiciously 
made  and  have  brought  to  him  splendid  returns. 

Mr.  Fowler  has  always  had  firm  faith  in  Waterloo  and  her  future  and  has 
done  everything  in  his  power  to  promote  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  city 
and  of  Black  Hawk  county.  His  chief  ambition,  perhaps,  has  been  to  further 
the  agricultural  development  of  this  section  of  the  state,  for  he  believes  that 
Iowa  people  have  an  unparalleled  chance  in  that  direction,  for  the  land  is  rolling, 
requiring  little  artificial  drainage  and,  moreover,  is  naturally  rich  and  productive. 
He  has  done  everything  in  his  power  to  stimulate  an  interest  in  all  branches  of 
agriculture  and  has  himself  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  cheese  which  has 
become  famous. 

On  the  i8th  of  March,  1875,  Mr.  Fowler  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Alice  Hillman,  who  was  born  in  Parma,  Monroe  county,  New  York,  a  daughter 
of  Roy  E.  and  Harriet  (Castle)  Hillman,  who  were  natives  of  Cattaraugus 
county,  New  York,  the  father  there  following  the  occupation  of  farming.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fowler  have  been  born  five  children :  Roy  H.,  who  is  a  salesman 
for  the  Fowler  Grocery  Company;  Mae  F.  and  Florence,  both  at  home;  Arthur, 
who  is  employed  in  his  father's  office ;  and  Julia,  also  at  home. 

Mr.  Fowler  holds  membership  in  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen 
and  with  the  United  Commercial  Travelers.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  Waterloo  and  is  interested  in  every  plan  and  project  for  the  upbuilding 
and  benefit  of  his  city.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  democratic  party 
but  he  has  never  sought  nor  desired  public  office.  His  religious  faith  is  indi- 
cated in  his  membership  in  the  First  Baptist  church.  His  life  has  indeed  been 
a  busy  and  useful  one,  characterized  by  the  wise  use  of  the  opportunities  which 
have  come  to  him.  He  has  displayed  sound  judgment  in  placing  a  valuation 
upon  his  chances  and  in  judging  those  things  which  make  up  his  life's  contacts 
and  experiences.  In  all  of  his  business  career  he  has  quickly  discriminated 
between  the  essential  and  the  non-essential  and  his  efforts  have  ever  been  of  a 
character  which  have  contributed  to  public  progress  as  well  as  to  individual 
success. 


JAMES  I-I.  GOODRICH. 

James  FI.  Goodrich  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  in  Waterloo,  buy- 
ing, selling  and  exchanging  property.  He  was  born  in  the  old  town  of  Charles- 
town,  now  a  part  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  October  i,  1857,  a  son  of  James  H. 
and  Janette  (Field)  Goodrich,  who  were  natives  of  New  York  and  Vermont 
respectively.  The  father  came  to  Iowa  in  1867,  the  family  following  in  1869, 
when  they  joined  him  in  the  estabHshment  of  a  home  in  Waterloo.  He  was  a 
bookkeeper  by  profession  and  for  several  years  was  employed  in  Farwell's 
Bank  of  this  city.     He  afterward  turned  his  attention  to  the  insurance  business, 


178  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

which  he  conducted  to  the  time  of  his  death  in  1900.  His  wife  survived  for 
several  years,  passing  away  in  1909.  In  their  family  were  four  children:  Cor- 
nelia, now  the  wife  of  J.  M.  Kirkpatrick,  a  resident  of  Ashland,  Oregon;  Leon, 
living  in  Waterloo;  Lizzie  B.,  whose  home  is  in  Mound,  JNIinnesota;  and  James  H. 
The  last  named  attended  the  schools  of  A'ermont  and  of  Massachusetts  until 
he  reached  the  age  of  twelve  years  and  following  the  removal  of  the  family  to 
this  state  continued  his  studies  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  AVaterloo  to 
the  age  of  eighteen  years.  He  afterward  secured  a  situation  as  a  clerk  in  Water- 
loo and  was  similarly  employed  in  Cedar  Rapids,  thus  spending  his  time  to  the 
age  of  twenty-one  years,  when  he  went  to  southwestern  Nebraska  and  took  up 
government  land,  residing  thereon  until  he  had  proved  up  his  claim.  In  the 
meantime  he  was  elected  treasurer  of  Redwillow  county,  Nebraska,  and  occu- 
pied that  position  for  five  years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  went  to 
Lincoln,  that  state,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  for  about 
three  years.  He  next  located  at  Holdrege.  Nebraska,  where  he  conducted  a 
real-estate  and  loan  business  for  two  years,  after  which  he  purchased  a  large 
ranch  of  five  thousand  acres  and  engaged  in  the  live-stock  business  for  two 
years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  returned  to  Iowa  and  accepted  a  position  as 
traveling  salesman,  spending  two  years  upon  the  road. 

In  1900  Mr.  Goodrich  embarked  in  the  grocery  business  in  Waterloo  and 
for  six  years  was  connected  with  that  line  of  business  but  bought  and  sold  sev- 
eral times  in  that  period.  He  next  returned  to  the  real-estate  field  and  in  con- 
nection with  the  purchase  and  sale  of  property  began  speculative  building  in 
1906.  He  first  erected  the  brick  building  on  Third  street  known  as  the  Third 
Street  Grocery.  He  also  built  a  large  apartment  house  at  the  corner  of  Third 
and  Locust  streets  which  he  now  owns,  occupying  one  of  the  apartments.  He 
has  built  and  sold  about  thirty-five  residences  in  that  section  of  Waterloo  and 
has  thus  contributed  much  to  the  improvement  of  the  city,  transforming  un- 
sightly vacancies  into  a  fine  residential  district.  In  addition  he  owns  and  rents 
one  thousand  acres  in  Minnesota  and  an  improved  farm  of  eighty  acres  in  low^a. 
He  follows  the  most  progressive  business  methods  and  has  done  much  toward 
the  upbuilding  of  Waterloo.  He  is  thoroughly  acquainted  with  property  values, 
which  enables  him  to  make  judicious  investments  and  profitable  sales,  and  as 
the  years  have  gone  on  his  efl^orts  have  been  an  element  in  public  progress  as 
well  as  individual  prosperity. 

Mr.  Goodrich  has  been  married  twice.  In  September.  1S85.  he  wedded  Miss 
Eva  Bishop,  a  native  of  Iowa  and  a  daughter  of  George  Bishop,  of  La  Porte 
City,  this  state,  who  there  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  but  is  now  deceased. 
Mrs.  Goodrich  passed  away  in  June,  1893,  leaving  a  son,  Paul  K.,  who  is  now 
engaged  in  the  grocery  business  in  Waterloo.  In  1901  Mr.  Goodrich  was  again 
married,  his  second  union  being  with  Miss  Carrie  Hitchcock,  a  daughter  of 
Nelson  and  Mary  Hitchcock.  In  addition  to  the  son  of  his  first  marriage  Mr. 
Goodrich  has  an  adopted  daughter.  Lucy  Whitney,  now  eleven  years  of  age. 

lames  H.  Goodrich  is  a  member  of  the  Congregational  church  and  he  was 
reared  in  that  faith,  his  father  having  been  a  deacon  of  the  church  for  twenty- 
five  years.  In  his  political  views  Mr.  Goodrich  is  a  repubHcan  and  for  two 
years  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  Indianola,  Nebraska,  but  since 
coming  to  Waterloo  has  never  sought  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  ener- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  179 

gies  upon  his  business  affairs  which,  carefully  conducted,  have  brought  to  him 
substantial  and  gratifying  success.  He  belongs  to  the  blue  lodge  and  chapter 
in  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  has  held  some  of  the  offices  in  those  organizations. 
Before  the  era  of  the  automobile  he  was  a  lover  of  fine  horses  but  since  the  in- 
troduction of  the  car  he  has  taken  an  intense  delight  in  motoring  and  greatly 
enjoys  a  good  run.  He  has  long  been  actively  interested  in  church  work,  con- 
tributes generously  to  the  cause,  and  for  a  number  of  years  has  served  as  trustee 
in  his  church.  In  a  word,  his  influence  is  always  on  the  side  of  right,  truth  and 
justice,  of  progress,  reform  and  improvement.  He  is  practical  in  all  that  he 
undertakes  and  while  he  holds  to  high  ideals,  uses  the  most  practical  methods 
to  secure  their  adoption. 


JUDSON  LAUGHLIN,  A.  M.,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Judson  Laughlin,  a  well  known  resident  of  Waterloo,  was  born  at  College 
Springs,  Iowa,  on  the  i6th  of  July,  1868,  a  son  of  James  Birney  and  Sarah  A. 
(Cross)  Laughlin,  both  of  whom  were  born  near  Bloomington,  Illinois.  The 
father  was  a  nurseryman  and  horticulturist  and  in  1854  removed  to  Iowa, 
locating  in  College  Springs.  Immediately  upon  his  arrival  there  he  established 
a  nursery  and  continued  to  conduct  it  with  growing  success  until  his  death, 
which  occurred  on  the  20th  of  January,  191 1.  His  wife  had  passed  away  many 
years  before,  as  she  was  called  to  her  reward  in  1877.  He  was  not  remiss  in 
his  duties  as  a  citizen  and  was  always  interested  in  anything  pertaining  to  the 
public  welfare  but  never  aspired  to  offfce. 

Dr.  Laughlin  is  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  six  children  and 
received  excellent  educational  advantages.  After  attending  the  public  schools 
of  College  Springs  he  became  a  student  at  Amity  College,  graduating  in  June, 
1890,  and  he  subsequently  entered  the  Ensworth  Central  Medical  school  at  St. 
Joseph,  Missouri,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  in 
1896.  Amity  College  conferred  upon  him  the  degree  of  A.  M.  in  1897.  Dr. 
Laughlin  was  married  in  1890  to  Miss  Ella  McCann,  who  was  born  and  reared 
in  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  and  belonged  to  a  prominent  family.  This  beloved  com- 
panion and  wife  was  called  to  her  reward  April  29,  1892.  Dr.  Laughlin  com- 
menced business  as  a  fruit  grower  near  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  and  so  continued 
for  about  eighteen  months.  It  was  after  this  that  he  began  his  professional 
studies  and  immediately  after  completing  his  medical  course  in  1896  he  began 
practice  at  Blanchard,  Iowa,  where  he  remained  for  two  years.  He  then  spent 
three  years  at  Grinnell,  Iowa,  and  was  for  thirteen  years  a  general  practitioner 
at  Ledyard,  Iowa.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  came  to  Waterloo  with  the  inten- 
tion of  opening  a  wholesale  drug  house  here  but  has  since  decided  to  establish 
it  at  Mason  City,  Iowa,  instead.  ITe  is  not  only  a  successful  physician  but  he 
also  is  an  excellent  business  man,  and  the  combination  of  detailed  and  technical 
knowledge  of  drugs,  their  composition  and  use,  and  sound  judgment  in  financial 
matters  should  insure  the  success  of  the  concern  which  he  intends  to  establish. 

Dr.  Laughlin  was  married  on  the  27Lh  of  June,  1895,  to  Miss  Anna  Roy, 
who  was  born  at  Palmyra,  Missouri,  and  was  left  an  orphan  when  a  mere  child. 


180  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

To  Dr.  and  Airs.  Laughlin  were  born  five  children,  Birney  Roy,  James  Byron, 
Geraldine,  Judson  M.  and  William  R.  The  wife  and  mother  passed  away  on 
the  24th  of  November,  1910,  and  on  the  21st  of  February,  191 2,  the  Doctor  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elsie  M.  Simpson,  a  native  of  Mason  City,  Iowa,  and 
a  daughter  of  John  Simpson,  a  prominent  farmer  of  Rake,  Iowa. 

Dr.  Laughlin  is  a  republican  in  political  matters,  gives  his  religious  adherence 
to  the  Congregational  church,  and  fraternally  is  connected  with  the  Modern 
Woodmen  of  America,  the  Yeomen,  and  the  blue  lodge  of  the  Masonic  order. 
His  professional  interest  is  attested  by  his  membership  in  a  number  of  medical 
societies,  including  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  the  Iowa  State 
Medical  Society,  the  Austin  Flint,  Cedar  A'alley  Medical  Society  of  Iowa,  the 
Tri-State  Medical  Society  of  Iowa,  Illinois  and  Missouri,  and  he  is  a  Fellow  of 
the  American  Medical  Association.  Although  at  present  not  in  active  practice. 
Dr.  Laughlin  intends  to  maintain  his  professional  standing  with  regular  physi- 
cians and  the  medical  profession  by  constantly  reading  his  medical  journals  and 
diligently  keeping  up  his  membership  in  the  best  medical  societies,  which  has 
been  his  hobby  for  the  past  nineteen  years.  Through  his  association  with  other 
])hysicians  in  these  organizations  he  keeps  informed  as  to  the  consensus  of 
opinion  in  medical  circles  and  is  also  able  to  give  others  the  benefit  of  his  experi- 
ence and  observation.  The  same  spirit  of  progressiveness  and  willingness  to 
cooperate  characterizes  his  relations  with  his  fellowmen  in  all  phases  of  life  and 
to  this  is  due  in  a  large  measure  his  success. 


CFIARLES  B.  SANTEE. 

Charles  B.  Santee  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Santee  Brothers,  conducting  an 
extensive  real-estate  business  in  the  handling  of  farm  lands  in  Iowa  and  the 
northwest.  He  was  born  in  Butler  county,  this  state,  near  Kesley,  November  6, 
1864,  a  son  of  Joseph  Laughery  and  Jane  (Nixon)  Santee.  The  father  was 
born  in  the  state  of  New  York,  October  8,  1827,  and  the  mother's  birth  occurred 
in  the  north  of  Ireland  in  1832.  In  early  life  Joseph  L.  Santee  engaged  in  the 
operation  of  a  sawmill  and  subsequently  cleared  a  farm  in  Ohio.  In  1855  he 
came  to  Iowa,  settling  at  Cedar  Falls  and  afterward  he  went  to  Butler  Center, 
where  he  built  the  first  house.  Still  later  he  took  up  his  abode  upon  a  farm 
seven  miles  west  of  the  town  and  there  the  children  of  the  family  were  born.  He 
resided  upon  the  farm  until  the  spring  of  1890,  when  he  again  removed  to  Cedar 
Falls,  where  he  spent  his  remaining  days,  passing  away  in  April,  1908.  His  wife 
had  previously  died  in  1900,  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years.  He  held  various 
local  ofhces,  including  those  of  justice  of  the  peace,  trustee  and  school  director, 
and  was  ever  faithful  to  the  trust  reposed  in  him.  In  his  family  were  five  chil- 
dren. The  mother  had  been  previously  married  and  had  three  children  by  the 
first  union.  The  father  had  also  been  married  before  and  had  one  child  by  his 
first  marriage. 

Charles  B.  Santee  attended  school  in  Mount  Vernon  and  continued  his 
education  in  the  State  Normal  school  at  Cedar  Falls,  now  known  as  the  State 
Teachers'  College.     He  remained  with  his  father  until  he  attained  his  majority 


J 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  181 

Hiid  in  early  manhood  devoted  the  winter  months  to  school  teaching  and  the 
summer  seasons  to  farm  wori<,  spending  his  time  in  that  way  until  twenty-five 
years  of  age.  He  then  went  to  Cedar  Falls  with  the  intention  of  reading  law 
but  changed  his  plans  and  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business,  in  which  he  has 
since  continued.  He  is  now  associated  with  his  brother,  Robert  A.  Santee,  under 
the  hrm  name  of  Santee  Brothers.  They  will  have  continued  business  under  that 
style  for  twenty-five  years  on  the  loth  of  April,  191 5.  They  buy,  handle  and 
sell  Iowa,  Minnesota,  Dakota  and  Canada  lands  and  have  a  good  clientage. 
They  have  disposed  of  thousands  of  acres  and  have  also  bought  and  sold 
mortgages  and  negotiated  loans.  Their  business  has  long  been  a  growing 
and  profitable  one  and  they  are  today  among  the  best  known  real-estate  men 
in  this  section  of  Iowa.  Moreover,  they  are .  large  stockholders  in  all  of  the 
different  factories  m  Cedar  Falls  and  their  sound  judgment  and  cooperation 
are  factors  in  the  business  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  city. 

On  the  5th  of  April,  1899,  Mr.  Santee  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lulu 
Probert,  of  Shell  Rock,  Butler  county,  Iowa.  The  father  died  during  the  early 
girlhood  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Santee,  and  the  mother  now  resides  in  Waterloo 
with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  A.  R.  Walker.  Mrs.  Santee  is  the  third  in  a  family 
of  six  children  and  by  her  marriage  has  become  the  mother  of  five  children, 
Harriet  Mary,  Leslie  Carleton,  Donald  Probert,  Margaret  Elizabeth  and  Paul 
Joseph. 

Mr.  Santee  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  camp  and  also  has  mem- 
bership with  the  Yeomen.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican,  interested  in  the  growth 
and  success  of  his  party.  He  has  served  as  recorder  of  Black  Hawk  county 
for  six  years  and  has  been  a  member  of  the  city  council.  He  was  a  delegate 
to  the  national  convention  in  191 2  and  favored  the  nomination  of  Cummins. 
He  is  now  serving  on  the  board  of  education  of  Cedar  Falls  and  the  cause  of 
public  schools  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  champion.  He  believes  in  progress  in 
all  things  and  does  everything  in  his  power  to  promote  advancement  and  upbuild- 
ing along  lines  that  will  contribute  to  the  general  good.  His  has  been  an 
active,  useful  and  well  spent  life.  He  has  accomplished  much  that  he  has 
undertaken  and  his  labors  have  by  no  means  been  concentrated  upon  efforts 
solely  for  his  own  benefit,  for  as  a  citizen  he  has  done  much  to  further  the 
public  welfare. 


EDWARD  H.  McCOY. 


In  a  profession  where  advancement  depends  entirely  upon  individual  merit 
and  ability,  Edward  H.  McCoy  has  made  continuous  progress  until  he  stands 
today  among  the  foremost  lawyers  of  Waterloo,  practicing  alone  and  having 
now  a  large  and  distinctively  representative  clientage.  He  is  one  of  Iowa's  native 
sons,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Butler  county  on  the  14th  of  February,  1881, 
a  son  of  John  and  Anna  (Coyle)  McCoy,  of  Waterloo.  The  father,  a  native  of 
Ireland,  became  a  resident  of  Butler  county,  Iowa,  in  1859  ^-ud  was  there  engaged 
in  farming  until  i860,  when  he  went  to  Chicago.  In  1861  he  responded  to  the 
country's  call  for  aid,  enlisting  as  a  member  of  Company  G,  Twenty-third  Illinois 


182  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Infantry,  which  was  known  as  Mulligan's  Irish  Brigade  of  Chicago.  With  that 
command  he  served  for  three  years  and  was  then  wounded  and  honorably  dis- 
charged because  of  disability.  He  was  subsequently  engaged  in  farmmg  in 
Butler  county  for  forty-four  years  or  until  190C),  when  he  came  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  is  now  residing. 

Edward  H.  McCoy  pursued  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Butler  county  and 
in  the  Iowa  City  Academy,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1899.  He  afterward 
entered  the  University  of  Iowa,  where  he  won  the  degrees  of  Ph.  B.  and  LL.  B. 
In  June,  1904,  he  was  admitted  to  the  Iowa  bar  and  in  September  of  the  same 
year  opened  his  office  in  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  engaged  in  practice.  He 
practices  in  all  the  courts  of  the  state  and  in  the  federal  courts  and  is  a  member 
of  the  State  and  American  Bar  Associations.  He  is  a  close  and  discriminating 
student  and  quickly  determines  what  is  essential  and  what  is  nonessential  in  the 
matter  of  evidence.  He  is  always  courteous  to  and  considerate  of  witnesses  and 
gives  to  the  court  that  deference  which  is  its  due. 

On  the  I2th  of  June,  1907,  Mr.  McCoy  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary 
F.  Kelly,  of  Sigourney,  Iowa.  They  hold  membership  in  St.  Joseph's  Catholic 
church  and  Mr.  McCoy  is  also  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  which 
organization  is  formed  of  those  of  the  Catholic  faith.  He  likewise  has  member- 
ship with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  with  the  Waterloo  Commer- 
cial Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  the  Town  Criers  Club.  For  ten  years  a  prac- 
titioner of  law  in  Waterloo,  he  has  become  widely  and  favorably  known  both  in 
professional  and  social  connections  and  has  gained  for  himself  a  creditable  place 
at  the  bar  of  Black  Hawk  count  v. 


HON.  HENRY  W.  GROUT. 

The  activities  of  Hon.  Henry  W.  Grout  touch  in  many  ways  the  general  in- 
terests of  society  and  have  been  an  element  in  advancing  progress  and  improve- 
ment along  various  lines.  His  sound  judgment  has  been  a  factor  in  furthering 
the  business  advancement,  his  public  spirit  has  been  manifest  in  official  service  and 
he  is  identified  with  plans  and  projects  which  are  ever  looking  to  the  benefit  and 
upbuilding  of  city,  state  and  nation.  Waterloo  numbers  him  among  her  native 
sons,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  this  city  in  1858,  his  parents  being  Samuel  B. 
and  Harriet  Augusta  (Whittemore)  Grout,  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased. 
Both  the  father  and  mother  were  natives  of  Massachusetts  and  in  the  year  1856 
they  removed  westward  to  Iowa,  settling  in  Black  Hawk  county,  where  the  father 
was  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits  throughout  his  remaining  days.  He  passe4 
away  in  1882,  having  for  a  brief  period  survived  his  wife,  who  died  in  1881. 

Reared  under  the  parental  roof,  Henry  W.  Grout  was  educated  in  the  schools 
of  Black  Hawk  county  and  in  Field  Seminary  of  Waterloo,  in  which  he  studied 
for  a  year.  When  not  busy  with  his  text-books  he  gave  his  time  to  farm  work, 
aiding  in  the  development  of  the  fields.  He  was  thus  busily  employed  until  he 
reached  his  majority,  when  he  went  to  the  west,  where  he  engaged  in  mining  for  a 
year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  returned  and  took  up  railroad  work, 
which  he  followed  until  his  father's  death,  when  he  once  more  located  upon  the 


mnawyatgwiiyiiMi^Mj 


HON.   HENRY   W.   GROUT 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  185 

farm  and  continued  its  cultivation  for  seven  years,  or  until  1889,  when  he  went 
upon  the  road  as  a  traveling  salesman,  devoting  the  ensuing  twelve  years  to  that 
business.  He  has  since  been  engaged  in  dealing  in  real  estate  and  has  negotiated 
many  important  property  transfers  and  has  himself  become  the  owner  of  con- 
siderable valuable  property.  He  likewise  has  other  business  connections,  for  he 
is  now  one  of  the  stockholders  and  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
First  National  Bank  and  also  of  the  Waterloo  Saddlery  Company.  In  fact,  he 
has  been  one  of  the  leading  spirits  in  many  of  the  city's  business  enterprises  and  is 
now  the  president  of  the  Fairview  Cemetery  Association.  He  is  a  man  of  un- 
faltering determination  and  in  his  vocabulary  there  is  no  such  word  as  fail,  for 
energy  and  ambition  prompt  him  to  carry  forward  to  successful  completion  what- 
ever he  undertakes. 

Mr.  Grout  is  recognized  as  an  active  factor  in  political  circles,  stanchly  advo- 
cating the  principles  of  the  republican  party.  He  served  on  the  board  of  park 
commissioners  and  in  that  connection  made  a  creditable  record.  He  was  elected 
to  represent  his  district  in  the  thirty-fourth  and  thirty-fifth  general  assemblies 
of  Iowa  and  in  November,  1914,  was  elected  state  senator  from  the  thirty-eighth 
district,  comprising  Black  Hawk  and  Grundy  counties,  for  four  years.  He  is  very 
popular  and  makes  friends  wherever  he  is,  not  only  among  the  followers  of  the 
republican  party,  but  among  those  who  are  opposed  to  him  politically.  His  con- 
stituents feel  that  there  is  a  brilliant  public  career  before  him.  He  has  ever  been 
a  public-spirited  citizen  and  in  office  has  made  a  creditable  record  through  his 
unfaltering  devotion  to  duty  and  the  capability  with  which  he  has  met  the  tasks 
required  of  him.  He  is  descended,  from  Revolutionary  ancestry  in  both  the 
paternal  and  maternal  lines  and  is  now  the  president  of  the  Iowa  State  Society 
of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution. 

Mr.  Grout  has  been  married  twice.  He  first  wedded  Mrs.  Olive  Wright  Wil- 
son, who  died  four  years  ago,  and  on  the  3d  of  September,  1914,  he  was  joined  in 
wedlock  to  Miss  Agnes  A.  Perry,  a  daughter  of  James  B.  and  Arlette  (Tuttle) 
Perry  of  McHenry,  Illinois.  They  attend  the  Baptist  church  and  Mr.  Grout  holds 
membership  in  the  Masonic  fraternity,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second 
degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and 
Board  of  Trade,  and  he  cooperates  in  all  movements  that  he  deems  of  benefit  and 
value  to  the  community  and  to  the  commonwealth,  while  in  his  public  service  he 
has  subordinated  personal  aggrandizement  and  advancement  to  the  public  good. 


FRANCES  AUGUSTA  GROUT. 

In  connection  with  educational  and  charitable  work  in  Black  Hawk  county 
the  name  of  Miss  Frances  Augusta  Grout  is  indeed  widely  known  and  honored. 
She  is  a  daughter  of  Samuel  B.  and  Harriet  Augusta  ( Whittemore)  Grout,  and 
a  sister  of  Senator  Henry  W.  Grout.  When  only  three  years  old  she  was 
brought  to  Waterloo  by  her  parents,  her  birth  having  occurred  in  McHenry 
county,  Illinois.  She  acquired  her  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Waterloo  and  afterward  supplemented  it  by  study  in  summer  schools  until  she 
reached  the  age  of  twenty  years,  when  she  entered  upon  the  profession  of  teach- 
voi.  n— 18 


186  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

ing,  being  paid  for  her  services  during  her  first  term  at  Dewar  eighteen  dollars 
per  month.  Her  life  thereafter  was  devoted  to  that  work  until  1912,  when  she 
retired.  Her  career  as  a  teacher  was  marked  by  continuous  progresN  and  improve- 
ment and  she  did  much  to  further  the  interests  of  public  education  in  Iowa. 
She  was  appointed  principal  of  the  Hawthorne  school,  with  which  she  was 
connected  for  nine  years,  and  afterward  became  principal  of  <,he  John  Fisk 
school,  her  entire  service  in  East  Waterloo  schools  covering  twenty-six  years. 

W^aterloo,  indeed,  owes  much  to  her  efforts,  which  have  been  both  practical 
and  progressive.  She  has  been  largely  instrumental  in  introducing  manual  train- 
ing and  has  assisted  in  establishing  manual  training  classes  and  in  introducing 
advanced  work  in  other  lines,  her  efforts  at  all  times  working  for  the  general 
betterment  of  the  Waterloo  public  schools.  She  is  spoken  of  in  terms  of  highest 
praise,  as  none  have  questioned  her  fidelity  or  had  doubt  as  to  her  efificiency. 
She  has  the  remarkable  record  during  all  the  years  of  her  service  in  connection 
with  the  schools  of  Waterloo  of  never  having  been  tardy  or  never  missing  a 
day's  attendance  on  account  of  illness. 

Miss  Grout  is  now  devoting  much  time  to  charitable  and  religious  work. 
She  is  very  active  in  connection  with  the  Young  Women's  Christian  Associa- 
tion, of  which  she  is  the  vice  president.  She  rightfully  believes  that  religion  is 
the  avenue  along  which  one  should  be  improved  physically,  mentally  and  morally 
and  she  has  been  greatly  interested  in  organizing  classes  among  the  working 
girls,  enabling  them  to  acquire  better  educations.  She  has  largely  solved  some 
of  the  problems  of  the  philanthropic  worker  for  which  others  have  found  no 
solution.  In  a  word,  as  Zona  Gale  puts  it,  she  has  learned  that  factory  workers, 
as  well  as  those  in  other  avenues  of  life,  are  "folks,"  and  that  the  secret  of 
helping  one's  fellows  is  not  to  work  for  them  but  to  work  with  them,  thus  obliter- 
ating the  distinction  of  class  which  produces  the  feeling  of  inferiority  and 
dependence.  Miss  Grout  is  also  an  active  member  of  Waterloo  Chapter,  D.  A.  R., 
is  chairman  of  the  Board  of  Associated  Charities,  is  vice  president  of  the  local 
Woman's  Christian  Temperance  Union  and  is  prominent  in  the  work  of  the 
First  Baptist  church,  constantly  broadening  her  efforts  along  those  lines.  Her 
labors  have  been  attended  with  far-reaching  and  beneficial  results  and  there  are 
many  in  Waterloo  who  have  cause  to  bless  her  for  her  timely  aid,  her  word  of 
encouragement  and  her  work  of  practical  assistance. 


CLAUDE  E.  CULLEY. 


Claude  E.  CuUey  is  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Kemble  Floral  Company 
of  Waterloo  and  devotes  his  entire  time  to  the  business,  which  is  now  liberally 
patronized  and  ranks  with  the  leading  establishments  of  this  character  in  Black 
Hawk  county.  A  native  of  Jefferson,  Iowa,  Mr.  Culley  was  born  August  30, 
1881,  a  son  of  Charley  H.  and  Ida  M.  (Keeler)  Culley.  The  father  was  the 
first  white  child  born  at  Jefferson  and  in  early  life  became  connected  with  mer- 
cantile interests,  as  did  his  father  before  him.  When  a  young  man  he  embarked 
in  business  in  Jefferson  and  later  went  to  Fort  Dodge,  Iowa,  where  he  continued 
in  the  same  line.     About   1893  he  became  a  resident  of  Marshalltown,  Iowa, 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  187 

where  he  established  a  retail  grocery  store  and  is  still  actively  engaged  in  the 
conduct  of  that  business.  Practically  all  his  life  has  been  devoted  to  mercan- 
tile interests  and  his  close  application  and  unremitting  energy  have  been  the 
salient  features  in  his  success.  His  wife,  who  was  born  in  Warren,  Illinois, 
also  survives. 

Claude  E.  Culley  is  the  eldest  in  their  family  of  six  children  and  in  the 
acquirement  of  his  education  he  attended  the  public  schools  of  Marshalltown, 
passing  through  consecutive  grades  until  he  became  a  high-school  pupil.  Through 
the  period  of  his  youth  he  gave  considerable  time  to  assisting  his  father.  Later 
he  spent  some  time  in  clerical  work  and  afterward  was  assistant  cashier  with 
one  of  the  large  business  houses  of  Chicago.  Because  of  his  father's  health, 
however,  he  returned  home  and  became  his  assistant  in  the  business  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  firm,  being  thus  connected  with  the  grocery  trade  in  Marshalltown 
until  January  i,  1914,  when  he  removed  to  Waterloo  and  entered  the  Kemble 
Floral  Company  as  one  of  the  stockholders  and  as  the  secretary  and  treasurer. 
He  now  devotes  his  entire  attention  to  the  business,  looking  after  the  sales  and 
otherwise  managing  the  interests  of  the  house. 

On  the  5th  of  February,  1914,  Mr.  Culley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Esther  L.  Seerley,  her  father  being  Ilomer  H.  Seeriey,  president  of  the  Iowa 
State  Teachers'  College  at  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa.  Mr.  Culley  is  an  advocate  of 
temperance  and  gives  his  political  support  to  the  prohibition  party.  His  life 
has  ever  been  honorable  and  upright  and  his  course  has  been  guided  by  manly 
principles.  Laudable  ambition  has  prompted  him  in  his  business  affairs  and 
in  his  removal  to  Waterloo,  Black  Flawk  county  gained  an  enterprising,  valuable 
and  public-spirited  citizen. 


HON.  CATO  SELLS. 


The  Hon.  Cato  Sells,  formerly  of  La  Porte  City,  is  acceptably  serving  as 
commissioner  of  Indian  afifairs  and  is  demonstrating  his  fitness  to  discharge 
duties  carrying  with  them  great  responsibility.  He  was  born  at  Vinton,  Iowa, 
on  the  6th  of  October,  1859,  a  son  of  Captain  George  W.  Sells,  a  lawyer  of 
marked  ability,  who  was  for  many  years  the  law  partner  of  ex-Governor  Sher- 
man. Removing  to  La  Porte  City  during  the  boyhood  days  of  the  subject  of 
this  review.  Captain  Sells  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  here  until 
his  death  in  December,   1873. 

After  the  death  of  his  father  Cato  Sells  was  given  employment  as  a  clerk 
in  the  B.  ^.  Stanton  hardware  store  and  he  attributes  much  of  his  success  to 
Mr.  Stanton,  who  gave  him  an  excellent  business  training  and,  moreover,  took 
a  personal  interest  in  his  welfare.  At  the  age  of  sixteen  years  Mr.  Sells  entered 
Cornell  College  at  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa,  and  three  years  later,  in  1878,  returned 
to  La  Porte  City  and  entered  the  office  of  Judge  C.  A.  Bishop,  where  he  took  up 
the  study  of  law.  After  two  years  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  in  1880  began 
the  practice  of  his  profession.  In  the  same  year  he  was  elected  city  recorder  of 
La  Porte  and  after  serving  in  that  capacity  for  two  years  was  given  still  greater 
honor,  as  he  was  chosen  mayor.     He  served  for  many  years  as  city  solicitor  and 


188  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

also  practiced  law  privately,  gaining  a  representative  and  lucrative  clientage. 
He  has  been  an  active  force  in  politics  for  many  years,  as  when  a  boy  of  nine- 
teen he  took  the  stump  for  the  democratic  party,  and  the  effectiveness  of  his 
speeches  and  his  youth  gained  him  the  name  of  the  "boy  orator."  His  interest 
in  public  affairs  grew  with  his  knowledge  of  statecraft,  and  his  fitness  for  office 
was  recognized  in  1886,  when  he  became  the  democratic  nominee  for  secretary 
of  state,  but  was  defeated  at  the  election.  In  1889  ^^  transferred  his  residence 
to  Mnton,  Iowa,  and  about  the  same  time  was  made  a  member  of  Governor 
Boies'  staff",  serving  in  that  capacity  for  four  years.  In  1892  he  was  elected  to 
fill  Governor  Dysart"s  place  on  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Iowa  State  College 
of  Agriculture  and  Mechanic  Arts  but  at  the  end  of  that  time  declined  reelection. 
He  was  twice  elected  state's  attorney  of  Benton  county  and  gamed  a  reputation 
as  one  of  the  most  able  and  vigilant  public  prosecutors  the  county  ever  had. 
In  1894  he  was  appointed  United  States  district  attorney  for  the  northern  district 
of  Iowa  and  proved  equally  efficient  and  aggressive  in  this  larger  field  of  action. 
He  subsequently  removed  to  Texas  and  while  living  there  was  appointed  com- 
missioner of  Indian  affairs,  which  position  he  still  holds,  now  living  at  Wash- 
ington, D.  C.  While  a  resident  of  Iowa  he  was  prominent  in  the  councils  of 
the  democratic  party,  representing  the  Dubuque  district  on  the  democratic  state 
committee  for  many  years,  while  in  1893  ^^^  ^^'^^  made  chairman  of  the  Iowa 
state  convention.  In  1892  he  was  honored  by  the  democratic  national  conven- 
tion, which  made  him  its  secretary.,  Mr.  Sells  is  well  remembered  in  La  Porte 
City,  where  he  began  his  public  career,  and  the  characteristics  of  integrity, 
keenness  of  insight  and  initiative  which  marked  him  in  his  relations  with  men 
here  have  enabled  him  to  win  advancement  in  state  and  national  affairs. 


ALBERT  R.  FERGUSON. 

Albert  R.  Ferguson,  partner  in  the  F"ergu5on  Manufacturing  Company,  which 
manufactures  all  kinds  of  well  drilling  machinery  and  supplies  at  No.  118  Rath 
street.  Waterloo,  was  born  in  Black  Hawk  county,  October  21,  1868,  his  parents 
being  Edward  and  Isabelle  ( Cummings )  Ferguson,  who  at  an  early  period  in 
the  development  of  this  section  of  Iowa  came  from  Pennsylvania  and  cast  in 
their  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Black  Hawk  county,  establishing  their 
home  eight  miles  northeast  of  Waterloo,  where  the  father  began  farming.  His 
remaining  days  were  devoted  to  the  further  development  and  cultivation  of  that 
place  and  his  death  occurred  in  1874.  The  mother  continued  to  reside  upon  the 
home  farm  with  her  family  until  about  1894,  when  they  came  to  Waterloo,  where 
Mrs.  Ferguson  still  makes  her  home.  By  her  marriage  she  became  the  mother 
of  six  children:  George  C.  who  is  interested  in  the  Ferguson  Manufacturing 
Company ;  Robert,  in  business  alone  in  Waterloo ;  Albert  R.,  of  this  review ; 
Stephen,  who  resides  in  Waterloo  and  acts  as  salesman  for  the  Ferguson  Man- 
ufacturing Company ;  Charles,  who  is  also  connected  with  the  firm ;  and  lona, 
the  wife  of  J.  W.  Noble,  who  is  assistant  postmaster  at  Manitou.  Colorado. 

Albert  R.  Ferguson  attended  the  district  schools  near  his  boyhood  home 
until    nineteen    years   of    age   and    afterward    pursued    a    commercial    course    in 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  189 

Waterloo.  Through  the  periods  of  vacation  his  attention  was  given  to  the 
work  of  the  farm  and  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years  he  rented  the  old  home- 
stead and  continued  the  further  cultivation  and  improvement  of  the  farm  for 
about  two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Waterloo  and 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Kelley  &  Tannehill  Company,  with  whom  he  continued 
for  about  six  or  seven  years,  during  which  time  he  gained  a  comprehensive 
knowledge  of  and  training  in  mechanical  pursuits  and  developed  his  latent 
powers,  thus  greatly  increasing  his  ability.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he,  with 
his  three  brothers,  organized  the  Ferguson  Manufacturing  Company  for  the 
manufacture  of  all  kinds  of  well  drilling  machinery  and  supplies.  They  have 
a  well  equipped  factory  supplied  with  the  latest  improved  machinery  necessary 
to  their  line  at  No.  ii8  Rath  street.  Mr.  Ferguson  is  secretary  of  the  company, 
with  three  of  his  brothers  as  partners,  and  he  devotes  his  entire  time  to  the 
factory.  He  now  owns  valuable  real  estate  in  Waterloo,  including  an  attractive 
residence  property  at   No.   150  Harrison  street. 

On  the  loth  of  October,  1894,  Mr.  Ferguson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Myrtle  Rodifer,  who  was  bom  in  Waterloo  in  a  house  which  then  stood  on 
the  site  of  the  present  Ellis  Hotel,  at  which  time  her  father  owned  the  entire 
block.  She  is  a  daughter  of  George  and  Mary  (Harrod)  Rodifer,  who  were 
among  the  early  and  highly  respected  residents  of  the  county.  The  father  here 
engaged  in  the  building  business  as  a  contractor  and  both  he  and  his  wife  died 
in  Waterloo.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ferguson  have  three  children.  Ruby  Lucille,  Leila 
Maud  and  Donald  E.,  all  at  home. 

Mr.  Ferguson  holds  membership  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America 
and  the  rules  which  govern  his  conduct  are  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  a 
member  of  the  Walnut  Street  Baptist  church,  to  the  teachings  of  which  he 
consistently  adheres.  In  politics  he  is  independent,  nor  has  he  ever  aspired  to 
public  office.  He  has  always  given  his  undivided  attention  to  his  business 
affairs  and  it  is  well  known  that  he  has  never  been  afraid  of  hard  work.  Energy 
and  close  application  have  been  the  salient  features  in  his  success  and  he  has 
advanced  step  by  step,  proving  his  worth  and  ability  in  concentrated  and  intel- 
ligently directed  effort. 


CHARLES  WARREN  HELLEN. 

Charles  Vv^arren  Hellen  early  displayed  the  business  ability  that  has  carried 
him  into  important  relations  as  president  of  the  Dart  Motor  Truck  Company, 
manufacturers  of  motor  trucks  in  Waterloo.  In  this  connection  he  is  shaping 
the  policy  and  directing  the  interests  of  a  most  important  enterprise  and  its  con- 
tinuous growth  is  largely  the  result  of  his  business  ability  and  keen  discrimina- 
tion. He  was  born  upon  a  farm  in  Winnebago  county,  Illinois,  near  Rockford, 
on  the  7th  of  October,  1882,  a  son  of  John  G.  and  Bertha  (Thompson)  Hellen, 
the  former  a  native  of  Iowa  and  the  latter  of  Illinois.  The  paternal  grand- 
father, Norval  Hellen,  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  about  1842  came  to 
Iowa,  being  among  the  first  of  the  pioneers  of  Hamilton  county,  in  which  locality 
he  spent  his  remaining  days,  there  passing  away  in  1909  at  the  advanced  age  of 


190  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

eighty-nine  years.  Both  he  and  the  maternal  grandfather  of  Charles  W.  Hellen 
were  forty-niners  of  the  California  gold  rush,  both  going  overland  with  wagon 
trains.  Mr.  Hellen  returned  by  the  same  route,  while  Mr.  Thompson  made  the 
return  trip  by  way  of  the  Isthmus.  The  latter  is  still  living  and  now  makes  his 
home  in  Webster  City,  Iowa,  being  in  vigorous  health  at  the  advanced  age  of 
eighty-nine  years. 

John  G.  Hellen  is  a  medical  graduate  and  for  several  years  practiced  his 
profession  in  Pecatonica,  Illinois,  but  for  the  past  fifteen  years  has  been  prom- 
inently identified  with  the  real-estate  business  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota. 

Charles  Warren  Hellen,  spending  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental  roof, 
acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  W^ebster  City,  but  as  early  as  his 
twelfth  year  went  to  work  for  the  Iowa  Telephone  company  at  that  place  and 
when  fifteen  years  of  age  was  made  manager  for  the  company,  which  a  year 
later  was  merged  with  the  E.  H.  Martin  Telephone  Company.  The  new  organ- 
ization also  controlled  the  Postal  Telegraph  office  in  Webster  City  and  while 
there  engaged  Mr.  Hellen  learned  telegraphy.  The  same  year  he  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Company  and  on  the  ist  of  September, 
1898,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Litchfield  Manufacturing  Company  of  Web- 
ster City,  manufacturers  of  agricultural  implements.  He  entered  the  employ 
of  that  company  at  a  salary  of  twenty  dollars  per  month  and  from  a  humble 
position  he  worked  his  way  steadily  upward  until  he  became  assistant  manager 
of  the  business  and  subsequently  was  made  credit  man  for  the  firm.  On  the 
removal  of  the  firm  to  Waterloo  in  1903  Mr.  Hellen  came  with  them  and  was 
identified  with  the  business  for  eleven  years,  having  within  that  time  become  a 
stockholder  in  the  company. 

In  1908,  in  connection  with  Lore  Alford,  Jr.,  Mr.  Hellen  established  the 
Black  Hawk  Abstract  Company  and  in  1909  he  sold  his  interest  to  his  partner. 
On  the  15th  of  September  of  the  same  year  he  went  to  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania, where  he  became  associated  with  the  C.  H.  Geist  Company,  operating 
a  line  of  gas  and  electric  light  plants  throughout  the  east.  He  was  placed  in 
charge  of  the  Wilmington.  Delaware,  office  and  when  three  months  later  the 
company  bought  out  two  plants  in  Atlantic  City,  Mr.  Hellen  purchased  an  inter- 
est in  these  plants  and  was  installed  as  office  manager  there.  In  1910  he  sold  his 
interest  in  that  business  and  in  connection  with  William  Galloway  purchased 
the  business  of  the  Dart  Manufacturing  Company  at  Anderson,  Indiana,  and 
removed  the  plant  to  Waterloo,  where  Mr.  Hellen  had  charge  of  the  erection  of 
the  buildings  and  the  installation  of  the  new  plant.  In  December,  1910,  he  was 
elected  president  and  manager  of  the  company  and  has  since  continued  at  the 
head  of  this  business,  which,  under  his  direction,  has  enjoyed  continuous  growth. 
On  the  1st  of  August,  1914,  the  company  was  reorganized  and  incorporated  as 
the  Dart  Motor  Truck  Company,  Mr.  Hellen  continuing  as  president  and  man- 
ager. This  company  builds  three  sizes  of  motor  trucks  and  ships  its  output 
all  over  the  world.  The  business  has  been  a  constantly  growing  one  and  is  now 
one  of  the  leading  manufacturing  enterprises  of  the  city. 

On  the  nth  of  October,  191 1,  Mr.  Hellen  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Ethel  M.  Miller,  a  daughter  of  W.  W.  Miller,  president  of  the  Commercial 
National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  daughters,  Mar- 
garet Louise  and  Elizabeth  Miller.     Politically  Mr.  Hellen  is  a  republican  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  191 

at  the  present  time  is  filling  the  office  of  river  front  commissioner  of  East 
Waterloo.  He  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Helmet 
Lodge,  No.  52,  K.  P. ;  and  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  290,  B.  P.  O.  E.  He  is  like- 
wise a  member  of  the  Illinois  Athletic  Club  of  Chicago.  He  belongs  to  the 
Waterloo  Commercial  Club,  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Commercial  National  Bank 
and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  The  steps  in 
his  orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible  and  since  starting  out  in  life  on 
his  own  account  at  the  early  age  of  twelve  years  he  has  worked  his  way  steadily 
upward,  advancing  continuously  and  thus  winning  at  all  times  a  broader  outlook. 
No  unusual  opportunities  have  come  to  him,  but  with  characteristic  energy  he 
has  improved  each  one  as  it  has  been  presented  and  thus  he  has  gained  the 
creditable  and  enviable  place  in  business  circles  that  he  today  occupies.  More- 
over, his  record  has  at  all  times  been  one  of  unfaltering  diligence  and  of  unques- 
tioned integrity,  proving  that  success  and  an  honored  name  may  be  won  simul- 
taneously. 


H.  D.  MOSES. 


H.  D.  Moses  was  for  a  long  period  identified  with  farming  interests  in 
Iowa  although  he  did  not  become  a  resident  of  Black  Hawk  county.  He  made 
his  home  in  Benton  county  and  was  one  of  its  pioneer  settlers.  His  birth 
occurred  in  March,  1839,  his  parents  being  Alfred  and  Catherine  (Perrine) 
Moses,  who  became  pioneer  residents  of  Illinois. 

H.  D.  Moses  was  reared  in  Illinois  and  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  sys- 
tem of  that  state  for  the  educational  privileges  which  he  received.  He  there 
engaged  in  farming  and  continued  his  residence  in  that  state  until  he  came  to 
Iowa  at  an  early  period  in  the  settlement  and  development  of  Benton  county. 
Subsequent  to  his  arrival  in  this  state  he  purchased  land  and  at  once  began  its 
cultivation  and  improvement.  In  the  course  of  years  he  transformed  the  place 
into  a  highly  improved  farm  and  made  his  home  thereon  throughout  his  remain- 
ing days,  his  death  occurring  in  October,  1881. 

Twenty  years  before,  or  in  October,  1861,  Mr.  Moses  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Rhoda  Williams,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Sarah  A.  (Drake)  Wil- 
liams, who  were  natives  of  New  York.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion and  always  followed  that  pursuit  in  the  Empire  state,  continuing  his  resi- 
dence there  until  he  was  called  to  his  final  rest  in  1880.  His  wife  survived 
him  for  about  nine  years,  passing  away  in  1889.  In  the  family  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Moses  there  were  six  children:  Albert,  a  resident  of  Nebraska;  Elmer,  who  is 
living  in  Washington;  Arthur,  who  makes  his  home  in  Montana;  John,  who 
resides  in  Nebraska ;  Minnie,  the  wife  of  R.  E.  Berry,  a  resident  of  Tama  county, 
Iowa ;  and  Libby,  the  youngest  of  the  family,  who  died  in  1892. 

Mr.  Moses  was  a  Mason  and  in  his  hfe' exemplified  the  beneficent  spirit  of 
the  craft.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  the  democratic  party  but  he  did 
not  seek  nor  desire  public  ofiice,  preferring  always  to  give  his  undivided  atten- 
tion to  his  farm  work,  whereby  he  provided  a  comfortable  living  for  his  family. 


192  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  the  year  1889  his  widow,  Mrs.  Rhoda  Moses,  became  the  wife  of  Henry 
Clark,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneer  farmers  of  Black  Hawk  county.  Settling 
here  at  an  early  day.  he  witnessed  the  greater  part  of  the  growth  and  development 
of  this  section  of  the  state  and  was  closely  associated  with  its  progress  along 
agricultural  lines.  At  the  time  of  his  arrival  he  secured  land  and  from  that 
day  until  his  death  was  connected  with  farming  interests.  He  died  upon  his 
farm  in  Spring  Creek  township  in  1908,  since  which  time  Mrs.  Clark  has 
removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where  she  has  since  made  her  home.  She  owns  con- 
siderable property  here  and  from  her  real-estate  holdings  derives  a  substantial 
annual  income.  She  is  now  seventy-nine  years  of  age  and  much  of  her  life 
has  been  passed  in  Iowa,  so  that  her  memory  forms  a  connecting  link  between 
pioneer  times  and  the  present.  She  has  seen  great  changes  and  can  relate  many 
interesting  incidents  concerning  the  early  days.  She  is  now  well  known  in 
La  Forte  City  and  in  other  sections  of  Black  Hawk  county  and  has  a  large 
circle  of  warm  friends. 


ARTHUR  C.  COLE. 


Arthur  C.  Cole,  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  and  in  speculative  build- 
ing in  Waterloo,  has  done  much  to  improve  the  city  architecturally  and  along 
the  lines  of  general  development  and  advancement.  He  was  bom  at  Yorkville, 
Illinois,  January  31,  1871,  a  son  of  William  G.  and  Martha  C.  (Casburn)  Cole, 
who  were  natives  of  England,  born  in  1833  ^"^  ^^3^  respectively.  In  early  life 
the  father  devoted  his  attention  to  merchandising.  About  1S68  he  and  his  wife 
crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world,  settling  in  Illinois,  where  they  continued 
to  make  their  home  until  1883,  when  they  came  to  Waterloo.  The  father  had 
practically  retired  from  business  at  that  time  and  he  continued  to  reside  here  in 
the  enjoyment  of  a  well  earned  rest  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1898. 
His  widow  now  resides  at  No.  626  Randolph  street  in  Waterloo. 

Arthur  C.  Cole  is  one  of  a  family  of  eight  children.  He  attended  public 
schools  in  Illinois  and  in  Waterloo  and  was  a  graduate  in  the  class  of  1900. 
with  the  degree  of  Ph.  B.,  of  the  university  at  Iowa  City.  He  was  eighteen 
years  of  age  when  he  entered  the  railway  mail  service  on  the  Rock  Island, 
running  between  Burlington  and  Albert  Lea,  Minnesota.  He  continued  for 
nineteen  years  in  the  service  and  during  that  period,  from  1896  until  1900,  pur- 
sued his  four  years'  course  in  college,  attending  school  during  his  lay-ofif  periods 
and  keeping  up  his  studies  while  absent  from  his  classes.  What  he  accomplished 
was  considered  very  remarkable  by  his  preceptors  and  it  indicated  the  strength 
of  his  character  and  his  laudable  ambition  along  the  line  of  intellectual  develop- 
ment. After  nineteen  years'  continuous  connection  with  the  mail  service,  in 
which  he  reached  the  highest  class  then  attainable,  he  turned  his  attention  to 
speculative  building  and  to  the  real-estate  business.  He  buys  vacant  property, 
plats  his  land  and  thereon  erects  houses  for  sale.  He  is  still  successfully  engaged 
along  this  line  and  his  efiforts  have  been  an  important  element  in  improving  and 
beautifying  various  sections  of  Waterloo.  In  his  building  operations  he  studies 
comfort,  convenience,  utility  and  beauty  and  he  has  erected  some  of  the  most 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  193 

attractive  modern  residences  of  Waterloo.  He  is  likewise  a  director  of  the 
Peoples  Building  «&  Loan  Association. 

In  June,  1908,  Mr.  Cole  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Anna  Holmes,  who 
was  born  at  Aurora,  Hamilton  county,  Nebraska,  a  daughter  of  Frank  and 
Lydia  (Bickley)  Holmes,  the  former  a  native  of  Manchester,  England,  and  the 
latter  of  Somerset  county,  Pennsylvania.  The  father  came  to  America  when 
a  lad  of  five  years  and  made  farming  his  life  work.  He  lived  first  in  Wisconsin, 
but  came  to  Iowa  in  1864.  Later  he  removed  to  Nebraska,  where  he  remained 
for  one  year,  and  then  returned  to  Black  Hawk  county,  settling  on  a  farm  near 
Hudson,  where  he  successfully  engaged  in  tilling  the  soil.  Later  he  took  up  his 
abode  in  Waterloo,  where  he  lived  retired  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in 
the  year  1896.  Lie  served  as  a  trustee  of  the  township  in  which  he  lived  and 
was  a  valued  and  representative  citizen  of  that  locality.  His  widow  still  lives 
in  Waterloo,  at  827  Randolph  street.  Their  daughter,  Mrs.  Cole,  was  the  second 
in  order  of  birth  in  their  family  of  six  children.  She  attended  the  public  schools 
of  West  Waterloo  and  is  a  graduate  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa  in  the 
class  of  1907  v;ith  the  degree  of  B.  S.  By  her  marriage  she  has  become  the 
mother  of  four  children,  Arline,  Erma  and  Virginia,  all  at  home,  and  Richardine, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  nine  months. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cole  are  members  of  the  First  Baptist  church  and  Mrs.  Cole 
also  belongs  to  the  Fortnightly  Literary  Club.  Mr.  Cole  holds  membership  with 
the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  also  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Town 
Criers  Club.  The  determination  and  strength  of  character  which  he  displayed 
in  acquiring  an  education  under  odds  which  would  have  utterly  discouraged 
many  a  man  indicates  much  of  his  nature.  He  has  ever  been  a  man  of  strong 
purpose,  resourceful,  energetic  and  determined.  In  his  business  he  has  seen 
the  opportunities  for  advancing  his  own  success  and  at  the  same  time  aiding  in 
the  development  and  improvement  of  the  city,  and  the  one  afifords  him  just  as 
great  pleasure  as  the  other,  for  he  is  a  public-spirited  citizen  and  gives  his  aid 
and  influence  to  the  side  of  improvement  and  advancement  along  all  the  lines 
which  contribute  to  Waterloo's  welfare. 


WILLIAM  KOBER. 


William  Kober,  president  of  the  Waterloo  Sash  &  Fixture  Works,  was  born 
in  Wheaton,  Illinois,  March  3,  1872,  a  son  of  August  and  Charlotte  Kober, 
who  now  reside  in  Charles  City,  Iowa,  to  which  place  they  removed  when  their 
son  William  was  a  little  lad  of  but  four  summers.  It  was  there  that  he  was 
reared  and  educated  as  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools.  As  early  as  his  fourteenth 
year,  however,  he  entered  upon  an  apprenticeship  to  the  carpenter's  trade,  work- 
ing during  the  summer  months  and  attending  school  in  the  winter  seasons.  His 
life  has  ever  been  one  of  unfaltering  industry  and  in  1888  he  returned  to 
Wheaton,  where  he  completed  his  apprenticeship  and  worked  at  his  trade  until 
1894.  He  then  again  went  to  Charles  City  and  secured  a  position  in  a  sash 
and  door  factory,  where  he  was  employed  until  the  spring  of  1900,  when  he 
came  to  Waterloo  and  secured  a  position  with  the  Cedar  Valley  Manufacturing 


194  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Company,  remaining  in  the  employ  of  that  organization  for  about  eighteen 
months. 

Mr.  Kober  afterward  spent  about  a  year  at  the  plant  of  the  Nauman  Com- 
pany and  in  1902  he  engaged  in  business  on  his  own  account,  purchasing  the 
interest  of  Stephen  Saulsbury  in  the  Novelty  Wood  Works.  He  became  a 
partner  in  the  last  named  corporation  which  in  1906  was  reincorporated  and 
reorganized  under  the  name  of  the  Waterloo  Sash  &  Fixture  Works,  at  which 
time  the  capital  stock  was  increased  from  ten  thousand  to  twenty-five  thousand 
dollars.  The  officers  of  the  company  are:  William  Kober,  president;  Harry 
Parks,  vice  president ;  Phillip  Koester,  secretary ;  and  Fred  Burk,  treasurer. 
In  191 1  the  business  had  increased  in  volume  to  such  an  extent  that  a  reorgan- 
ization of  the  company  and  an  increase  of  its  capital  stock  were  found  neces- 
sary, at  which  time  the  latter  was  increased  to  fifty  thousand  dollars.  This  is 
one  of  the  important  manufacturing  industries  of  Waterloo,  conducting  an 
extensive  and  growing  business,  their  trade  relations  now  covering  a  wide  ter- 
ritory. They  have  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best 
advertisement  and  their  efiforts  to  please,  combined  with  honorable  business 
dealings  and  the  excellence  of  their  product,  have  been  the  chief  factor  in  their 
growing  prosperity. 

In  1894  Mr.  Kober  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Anna  Zeas,  a  native  of 
Germany,  who  came  to  the  United  States  in  1890,  being  then  in  young  woman- 
hood. They  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children:  Edgar  Irving,  who  is 
attending  the  University  of  Illinois ;  and  Frances  Emma,  a  student  in  the  Water- 
loo high  school. 

Mr.  Kober  belongs  to  the  Brotherhood  of  American  Yeomen,  the  Modern 
Woodmen  of  America,  the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees,  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose, 
and  to  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.  He  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in 
support  of  the  men  and  measures  of  the  republican  party,  but  the  honors  and 
emoluments  of  office  have  had  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  has  always  preferred 
to  devote  his  attention  to  his  business  affairs  and  other  outside  interests,  which 
he  considers  more  vital  to  his  life  than  holding  office.  He  and  his  wife  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  their  many  good  traits  of  character 
have  firmly  established  them  in  the  high  respect  and  good-will  of  their  fellow 
citizens. 


J.  G.  McAL\TN,  M.  D. 


Dr.  J.  G.  McAlvin,  physician  and  surgeon  of  Waterloo,  well  qualified  for 
the  onerous  duties  of  the  profession  by  a  broad  course  of  study  in  the  State 
University  of  Iowa  and  subsequent  post-graduate  work  in  New  York  city  and 
the  leading  medical  centers  of  Europe,  has  engaged  in  practice  in  Waterloo 
since  1910.  He  was  born  in  Farmersburg  near  McGregor,  Iowa,  October  16, 
1869,  a  son  of  Dr.  James  McAlvin,  who  was  a  native  of  Scotland,  and  was  a 
graduate  in  medicine,  having  acquired  his  education  in  the  Edinburgh  Univer- 
sity. He  was  one  of  the  early  practitioners  in  northeastern  Iowa  and  was  one 
of  the  first  doctors  in  the  United  States  to  open  the  abdomen  in  the  region  of 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  195 

the  appendix  for  the  treatment  of  abscess  and  inflammation  of  the  bowels,  not 
realizing  that  he  was  opening  an  abscess  of  the  appendix. 

Dr.  J.  G.  McAlvin  spent  his  youthful  days  in  his  parents'  home  and  supple- 
mented his  early  educational  privileges  by  study  in  the  State  Normal  school  at 
Cedar  Falls  and  in  the  State  University  of  Iowa,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
in  the  class  of  1895  with  the  degree  of  Ph.  B.  Subsequently  he  pursued  his 
medical  course  in  the  same  institution  and  won  his  professional  degree  as  a 
member  of  the  class  of  1897.  Following  his  graduation  he  went  immediately  to 
New  York  city  and  continued  his  studies  in  the  New  York  Post  Graduate  school. 
Thus  splendidly  equipped  for  professional  duties  and  responsibilities,  he  located 
for  practice  in  Grundy  Center  in  the  spring  of  1898.  Success  attended  his 
efforts  during  the  six  years  of  his  residence  there  and  in  the  spring  of  1904  he 
went  abroad,  taking  special  work  in  the  line  of  his  profession  in  London  and  in 
Edinburgh,  spending  some  eight  months  in  study.  In  1905  he  returned  to 
Iowa,  settling  at  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  resided  until  1910,  when  he  came  to 
Waterloo,  seeking  a  broader  held  of  labor.  In  the  intervening  years  to  the 
present  he  has  built  up  an  extensive  practice,  being  ranked  among  the  success- 
ful physicians  of  the  city.  He  is  able  and  conscientious  in  the  performance  of 
professional  duties,  is  most  careful  in  the  diagnosis  of  cases  and  at  all  times 
is  keenly  interested  in  the  investigations  w^hich  throw  light  upon  the  complex 
mystery  which  we  call  life. 

In  1899  Dr.  McAlvin  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Clara  Grace  Hurst, 
of  Cedar  Falls,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children:  Helen  Mar  and 
James  Hurst.  Dr.  McAlvin  is  well  known  in  Masonic  circles  as  a  member  of 
Emerald  Lodge,  No.  334,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  Ionic  Chapter,  No.  100,  R.  A.  M., 
both  of  Grundy  Center.  Both  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Order 
of  the  Eastern  Star,  and  Mrs.  McAlvin  is  a  member  of  the  Congregational 
church.  They  are  highly  esteemed  for  their  many  attractive  social  qualities 
and  during  the  period  of  their  residence  in  Waterloo  have  gained  many  warm 
friends,  the  hospitality  of  many  of  the  best  homes  being  freely  accorded  them. 


LE  CLAIR  MARTIN. 


Le  Clair  Martin,  attorney  at  law  of  Cedar  Falls,  was  born  in  Paola,  Kansas, 
on  the  29th  of  November,  1870,  a  son  of  Dr.  Charles  M.  Martin,  a  native  of 
Miami  county,  Ohio,  who  for  thirty-five  years  was  prominent  in  the  medical 
profession  in  Illinois  and  Iowa.  At  the  present  time,  however,  he  is  living 
retired  in  Denver,  Colorado.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Hortense 
Bell,  was  the  first  white  child  born  in  Knox  county,  Illinois,  and  her  death 
occurred  in  April,  1910. 

Le  Clair  Martin  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  at  the  Hull  Educa- 
tional Institute  at  Hull,  Iowa,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of 
1888.  In  1891  he  entered  the  University  of  Michigan,  in  which  he  spent  two 
years.  In  1893  his  parents  removed  to  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa,  and  he  attended 
Cornell  College  the  following  year.  He  was  graduated  from  that  institution 
with  the  Ph.  B.  degree  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1894,  after  which  he  returned 


196  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

to  Ann  Arbor  and  took  up  the  study  of  law  and  completed  his  course  in  the 
University  of  Michigan,  where  again  the  Ph.  B.  degree  was  conferred  upon 
him  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1895.  In  that  institution  he  continued  his  law 
studies  and  received  the  LL.  B.  degree  upon  graduation  with  the  class  of  1896. 
In  the  autumn  of  the  same  year  he  came  to  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  entered  into 
a  law  partnership  with  Herman  C.  Hemenway,  which  connection  existed  until 
the  time  of  Mr.  Hemenway "s  retirement  on  the  ist  of  October,  191 3.  The  same 
month  Mr.  Martin  became  a  partner  of  Harry  B.  Turnipseed,  a  relationship 
that  has  since  been  maintained.  The  firm  is  one  of  the  foremost  at  the  bar  of 
Cedar  Falls  and  is  accorded  a  clientage  that  is  not  only  large  but  distinctively 
representative.  Mr.  Martin  is  regarded  as  a  very  able  lawyer  and  he  prepares 
his  cases  with  that  thoroughness  and  precision  which  must  always  be  the  fore- 
runner of  success  in  the  courts. 

In  October,  1901,  Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  White 
Kinne,  of  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan,  a  daughter  of  Judge  Edward  D  Kinne,  who 
for  twenty-seven  years  has  sat  on  the  district  bench  of  \\'ashtenaw  county, 
Michigan.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin  are  the  parents  of  a  son  and  two  daughters, 
Edward  Kinne,  Mary  Grace  and  Helen  Hortense. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Martin  is  a  stalwart  republican,  giving  earnest 
support  to  the  party  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise.  He 
served  in  the  years  1899  and  1900  as  city  attorney  but  has  never  been  an  aspirant 
for  public  office.  He  belongs  to  Red  Cedar  Lodge,  No.  83,  K.  of  P. ;  to  the 
Cedar  Falls  Commercial  Club  and  the  Oak  Lawn  Golf  Club.  He  is  also  a 
member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Cedar  Falls  public  library.  He  holds 
membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  in  which  he  is  serving  as 
steward,  and  his  wife  is  a  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  He 
takes  the  keenest  interest  in  everything  pertaining  to  the  public  welfare  and  to 
the  upbuilding  and  development  of  city  and  county  and  cooperates  heartily 
with  measures  and  movements  for  the  general  good.  At  the  same  time  he  gives 
careful  attention  to  his  law  practice  and  his  devotion  to  his  clients'  interests  is 
proverbial. 


B.  A.  HASELMAN. 


B.  A.  Haselman  is  a  prominent  factor  in  business  circles  of  Waterloo  as 
the  leading  harness  manufacturer  of  the  city,  being  at  the  head  of  the  Western 
Harness  &  Supply  Company  at  Xo.  615  Commercial  street,  which  was  organ- 
ized in  1902.  He  conducts  both  a  wholesale  and  retail  enterprise,  doing  a  mail 
order  business  and  selling  to  the  farmer  direct.  His  birth  occurred  in  Dubuque 
county,  Iowa,  in  1872,  his  parents  being  Anton  and  Leonore  Haselman,  both 
of  whom  passed  away  in  that  county.  The  father  was  successfully  engaged 
in  business  as  a  contractor  and  builder.  To  him  and  his  wife  were  born  nine 
children,  as  follows :  John,  who  died  when  twenty-seven  years  of  age ;  Fred, 
who  is  a  resident  of  Empire  City,  Minnesota ;  Chris,  living  in  Nashua,  Iowa ; 
Fritz,  of  Wilmont,  Minnesota;  B.  A.,  of  this  review;  Anna,  who  gave  her  hand 
in    marriage    to    Albert    Newman,    of    Dubuque,    Iowa;    Hannah,    the    wife    of 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  197 

Michael  Eckstein,  of  Dubuque,  Iowa;  Kate,  who  is  the  wife  of  Jacob  Smith 
and  resides  in  southern  Minnesota ;  and  Gertrude,  the  wife  of  Asa  Freeman, 
of  Minneapolis,  Minnesota. 

B.  A.  Haselman  obtained  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  his  native 
county  and  after  attaining  his  majority  served  an  apprenticeship  in  the  harness 
business.  Subsequently  he  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account  as  a  manu- 
facturer of  and  retail  dealer  in  harness  at  Norway,  Benton  county,  Iowa.  In 
1901  he  sold  out  and  came  to  Waterloo,  establishing  the  Western  Harness  & 
Supply  Company,  which  was  organized  as  such  in  the  following  year.  Success 
has  attended  his  efforts  and,  as  above  stated,  he  is  now  the  leading  harness 
manufacturer  in  the  city.  He  owns  one  of  the  handsome  homes  of  Waterloo 
and  also  has  residence  property  at  Dyersville,  Iowa. 

In  November,  1898,  Mr.  Haselman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Rose 
liehle.  who  was  born  in  Norway,  Benton  county,  this  state,  and  whose  parents 
died  when  she  was  but  a  child.  She  has  one  brother,  Louie,  and  three  sisters, 
namely:  Minnie,  who  is  the  wife  of  George  Frese,  of  Norway,  Iowa;  Mary, 
the  wife  of  Joseph  Erger,  of  Norway,  this  state;  and  Anna.  Mrs.  Haselman 
is  the  youngest  of  the  family  and  a  high-school  graduate.  By  her  marriage 
she  has  become  the  mother  of  two  sons  and  a  daughter,  as  follows :  Eldred  A., 
who  was  born  in  1901  ;  Roger  F.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  1907;  and  Marlys  R., 
born  in  1913.  Mr.  Haselman  is  identified  fraternally  with  the  Benevolent  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks.  Fie  is  an  active,  intelHgent  and  progressive  business  man 
and  one  of  the  valued  and  representative  citizens  of  Black  Hawk  county. 


JOSEPH  A.  McNAUGHTON. 

Joseph  A.  McNaughton,  a  well  known  resident  of  La  Porte  City,  still  owns 

considerable  land  and  was  for  some  time  actively  engaged  in  farming.     He  was 

born  in  Cedar  township,  Black  Hawk  county,  on  the  5th  of  June,  1862,  a  son 

of  Alexander  and  Jane  McNaughton.    The  father  was  a  native  of  Fort  William, 

Inverness-shire,  Scotland,  and  the  mother  of  Canada,  although  of  Scotch  descent. 

When  a  boy  of  eleven  years  Alexander  McNaughton  accompanied  his  parents 

to  America,'  the  family  locating  in  the  province  of  Quebec,  Canada.     He  learned 

the  carpenter's  trade  and  followed  that  occupation  in  the  Dominion  until  the  fall 

of  1859,  when  he  came  to  the  States  and  made  his  way  by  stage  to  Black  Hawk 

county. '  He  was  accompanied  by  his  wife  and  seven  children  and  on  his  arrival  in 

Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa,  his  capital  consisted  of  but  forty  dollars.     He  cultivated  a 

rented  farm  for  five  years,  after  which  he  purchased  a  place  and  gave  his  attention 

to  its  cultivation  and  development.     He  also  worked  at  his  trade  to  some  extent 

and  was  successful  in  both  lines  of  activity.     On  the  6th  of  January,  1913,  he 

passed  away  at  the  unusual  age  of  ninety-three  years,  having  survived  his  wife 

for  almost  fourteen  years,  as  her  death  occurred  on  the  23d  of  February,  1899. 

Joseph  A.  McNaughton  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  acquired 
his  early  education  in  the  local  schools.  He  later  attended  Tilford  Academy 
at  Vinton,  Iowa,  after  which  he  returned  home  and  remained  upon  the  farm 
until  the  death  of  his  father.     He  then  purchased  the  interests  of  the  other  heirs 


198  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

in  the  homestead  and  became  its  sole  owner.  It  comprises  two  hundred  and 
eighty  acres  in  Cedar  township  and  is  a  valuable  property,  as  the  land  is  naturally 
fertile  and  the  farm  has  been  wisely  developed.  Mr.  McNaughton  also  owns  a 
section  of  land  in  Colorado,  while  the  family  together  hold  title  to  twenty-three 
hundred  acres  and  are  numbered  among  the  extensive  land  owners  of  the  county. 
He  cultivated  the  homestead  for  about  a  year,  or  until  March,  1914,  and  then  left 
the  farm  and  removed  to  La  Porte  City  with  the  intention  of  soon  returning  to 
the  work  of  an  agriculturist.  However,  he  became  interested  along  other  lines 
and  has  now  definitely  taken  up  his  residence  in  La  Porte  City,  where  he  owns 
a  beautiful  home.  He  is  the  republican  candidate  for  county  supervisor  and  is 
devoting  a  great  deal  of  time  to  political  activity.  For  twenty  years  he  served  as 
clerk  of  Cedar  township  and  for  about  twelve  years  was  treasurer  of  the  school 
board.  In  1910  he  was  appointed  census  enumerator  and  performed  accurately 
and  thoroughly  the  duties  of  that  position.  While  upon  the  farm  he  made  a 
specialty  of  raising  Chester  White  hogs  and  Durham  cattle  and  was  known  as  a 
successful  stockman. 

Mr.  McNaughton  is  a  Presbyterian  and  bases  his  rules  of  conduct  upon  the 
teachings  of  that  organization.  Fraternally  he  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias 
lodge  and  the  Knights  of  Luther.  He  is  one  of  the  substantial  and  representa- 
tive citizens  of  the  county  and  is  a  man  of  tried  ability  and  integrity,  respected 
and  esteemed  by  all  who  know  him. 


OLLIE  O.  FOULK. 


Ollie  O.  F'oulk,  a  lifelong  resident  and  substantial  agriculturist  of  Black 
Hawk  county,  makes  his  home  on  section  31,  Cedar  township.  His  birth 
occurred  in  that  township  in  January,  1877,  his  parents  being  W.  H.  and  Cather- 
ine (Myers)  Foulk,  natives  of  Perry  county,  Pennsylvania.  The  year  1867 
witnessed  their  arrival  in  Black  liawk  county,  Iowa,  and  here  the  father  pur- 
chased eighty  acres  of  land  on  sections  30  and  29,  Cedar  township,  at  once 
beginning  the  improvement  of  the  property.  As  time  passed  and  his  financial 
resources  increased,  owing  to  his  untiring  industry  and  capable  business  man- 
agement, he  augmented  his  holdings  by  additional  purchase  until  at  the  present 
time  he  owns  six  hundred  acres  of  valuable  land  on  sections  5,  29,  30  and  31, 
Cedar  township,  all  of  which  he  is  cultivating  and  which  yields  him  a  gratifying 
annual  income.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Foulk,  sixty-eight  and  seventy  years  of  age 
respectively,  have  lived  in  this  county  for  nearly  a  half  century  and  enjoy  a 
very  wide  and  favorable  acquaintance  within  its  borders. 

Ollie  O.  Foulk  was  reared  and  educated  in  Black  Hawk  county,  supple- 
menting his  earlier  training  by  a  three  years'  course  of  study  in  the  Waterloo 
Business  College.  He  remained  under  the  parental  roof  until  twenty-three 
years  of  age  and  then  started  out  as  an  agriculturist  on  his  own  account,  culti- 
vating a  rented  farm  for  one  year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  pur- 
chased a  tract  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  on  section  31,  Cedar  township, 
improved  the  place  and  has  since  been  busily  engaged  in  its  operation.  Later 
he  bought  eighty  acres  of  the  Smith  farm  on  section  29  and  this  he  also  culti- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  199 

vates.  He  is  now  feeding  forty-seven  head  of  cattle  and  annually  feeds  one  or 
two  car  loads,  his  live-stock  interests  adding  materially  to  his  income. 

In  January,  1900,  Mr.  Foulk  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Carrie  M. 
Weigle,  her  parents  being  John  and  Susan  Weigle,  who  were  natives  of  Ger- 
many and  emigrated  to  the  United  States,  locating  in  Black  Hawk  county,  Iowa, 
in  an  early  day.  The  father  purchased  land  in  Eagle  township  and  actively 
continued  its  cultivation  until  called  to  his  final  rest  in  1909.  For  a  number  of 
years  he  had  survived  his  wife,  who  passed  away  about  1893.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Foulk  have  been  born  five  children,  namely:  Harold,  Orie,  Marie,  Edna 
and  Nelda. 

In  politics  Mr.  Foulk  is  a  stanch  republican,  having  supported  the  men  and 
measures  of  that  party  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise. 
For  the  past  four  years  he  has  served  as  school  director  and  at  the  recent  elec- 
tion was  chosen  township  trustee.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Christian 
church.  Fie  has  always  taken  an  interest  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  upbuilding 
or  development  of  the  community  and  gladly  gives  his  support  to  every  measure 
the  adoption  of  which  he  feels  would  promote  the  general  welfare. 


ANSON  THEODORE  HUKILL. 

Anson  Theodore  Hukill  is  superintendent  of  schools  on  the  west  side  of 
Waterloo  and  has  devoted  his  entire  life  to  educational  work,  being  recognized 
today  as  one  of  the  prominent  representatives  of  professional  activity  of  that 
character  in  the  state.  He  was  born  upon  a  farm  in  Belmont  county,  Ohio, 
October  4,  1858,  and  is  of  Holland  lineage,  the  name  having  been  originally 
spelled  Huykl.  Little  is  known  of  the  early  history  of  the  family  in  this  country, 
but  his  paternal  great-grandfather,  Joseph  Hukill,  served  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  His  grandfather,  Joseph  Cochran  Hukill,  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  and 
died  in  Ohio,  in  1870,  at  the  very  venerable  age  of  ninety-three  years.  His 
son,  Joseph  C.  Hukill,  was  born  in  Ohio  and  in  early  manhood  wedded  Mary 
Jane  Hall,  also  a  native  of  that  state.  In  1861  they  came  to  Iowa,  settling  on 
a  farm  in  Iowa  county,  and  in  1890  they  removed  to  Mount  Pleasant,  where 
they  lived  for  ten  years.  In  1900  they  became  residents  of  Cedar  Rapids, 
where  Mrs.  Hukill  still  makes  her  home  but  in  1914  was  called  upon  to  mourn 
the  loss  of  her  husband,  who  passed  away  on  the  21st  of  April  of  that  year. 

Anson  T.  Hukill  was  only  three  years  old  when  the  family  arrived  in  this 
state.  He  pursued  his  education  in  the  country  schools  of  Iowa  county  and 
afterward  attended  the  Iowa  City  Academy,  where  he  prepared  for  entrance  to 
the  Iowa  State  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1887  with  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Philosophy,  while  in  1890  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts  was  con- 
ferred upon  him  by  the  same  institution.  On  leaving  college  he  at  once  took  up 
the  profession  of  teaching,  becoming  superintendent  of  schools  at  West  Branch, 
Iowa,  where  he  remained  for  five  years.  He  afterward  spent  seven  years  at 
Williamsburg,  Iowa,  as  superintendent  of  schools,  and  in  1899  he  accepted  his 
present  position  as  superintendent  of  schools  on  the  west  side  of  Waterloo, 
where  he  has  now  remained  for  fifteen  years.     He  holds  to  high  ideals  in  his 


200  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

profession,  is  ever  advancing  and  improving  his  standards  and  through  practical 
effort  has  greatly  promoted  the  interests  of  public  education  in  this  city  and 
state. 

On  the  30th  of  July,  1887,  at  Iowa  City,  Iowa,  Mr.  Hukill  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Josephine  Van  Meter,  who  passed  away  on  the  7th  of  October, 
1910,  leaving  one  son,  Olin  \'an  Meter.  On  the  17th  of  July,  1913,  at  Waterloo, 
Iowa,  Mr.  Hukill  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Miss  Mary 
E.  Mishler. 

Mr.  Hukill  votes  with  the  republican  party  but  has  never  had  aspiration  for 
political  office.  His  military  record  covers  service  as  captain  of  Company  B 
(University  Battalion),  Iowa  National  Guard,  at  Iowa  City,  during  his  senior 
college  year,  to  which  rank  he  rose  from  that  of  corporal.  In  Masonry  he  has 
attained  the  Knight  Templar  degree  and  he  also  has  membership  with  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  likewise  belongs 
to  the  Fortnightly  Club,  a  literary  society  of  which  he  has  been  the  president, 
and  he  holds  membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church — relations  which 
indicate  the  nature  of  his  interests.  He  correctly  values  life  and  its  opportuni- 
ties, sees  the  chance  for  progress  and  improvement  along  material,  intellectual 
and  moral  lines  and  has  been  an  active  factor  in  the  movement  for  general 
uplift. 


B.  H.  BYVANK. 


B.  H.  Byvank  is  the  president  of  the  Byvank  Transfer  &  Storage  Company 
of  Waterloo.  He  was  born  in  Cook  county,  Illinois,  on  the  27th  of  December, 
i860,  and  is  a  son  of  George  G.  and  Jennie  (Glass)  Byvank.  The  mother  died 
during  the  infancy  of  her  son  and  in  1865  the  father  came  to  Iowa  with  his  family, 
settling  on  a  farm  in  Bennington  township.  Black  Hawk  county,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  reside  until  called  to  his  final  rest. 

B.  H.  Byvank  was  but  five  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  removal  to  this  state 
and  in  the  district  schools  of  Bennington  township  he  pursued  his  education.  At 
the  time  of  his  father's  death  he  was  nineteen  years  of  age  and  upon  him  at  that 
time  developed  the  management  of  the  home  farm.  He  was  married  in  1885  and 
continued  to  engage  in  general  agricultural  pursuits  upon  the  old  homestead  for 
three  or  four  years  longer.  He  then  bought  a  farm  for  himself  in  Bennington 
township,  continuing  its  cultivation  until  1895,  when  he  removed  to  Waterloo 
and  for  six  or  seven  years  was  employed  by  the  Cutler  Hardware  Company,  but 
was  ambitious  to  engage  in  business  on  his  own  account  and  at  the  end  of  that 
time  purchased  a  team  and  dray,  thus  starting  in  the  transfer  business.  From 
that  humble  beginning  has  been  developed  his  present  extensive  drayage  and  trans- 
fer business  until  he  now  utilizes  sixteen  teams  and  wagons  beside  an  auto  truck. 
His  patronage,  which  has  grown  year  by  year,  is  extensive  and  indicates  wise  and 
careful  management  of  his  afifairs  and  reliable  business  methods. 

In  1885,  Mr.  Byvank  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Mary  Reinhardt,  of 
Bremer  county,  Iowa,  by  whom  he^  had  three  children,  two  of  whom  survive, 
namely:    Clarence  A.,  who  is  associated  with  his  father  in  business ;  and  Elsie,  at 


MR.   AND   MRS.   B.   H.   BYVANK 


,0N* 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  203 

home.  He  holds  membership  in  Black  Hawk  Lodge,  No.  ']2,  L  O.  O.  F.,  the 
Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  Yeomen  and  the  Waterloo  Commercial  Club.  All 
this  indicates  the  nature  of  his  interests  and  the  breadth  of  his  public  spirit.  His 
has  been  a  busy  and  active  life  in  which  from  his  school  days  to  the  present  there 
have  been  few  idle  hours.  He  recognized  the  fact  that  in  America  labor  is  king 
and  that  he  who  would  rule  must  win  his  advancement  and  demonstrate  his 
worth. 


JOHN  COOK  GATES. 


John  Cook  Gates,  a  member  of  the  Black  Hawk  county  bar,  practicing  at 
Waterloo  as  the  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Gates  &  Lififring,  was  born  at 
Hopewell,  Ontario  county,  New  York,  February  i6,  1838,  a  son  of  Joseph 
Brown  and  Pamelia  Bishop  (Cook)  Gates,  also  natives  of  the  Empire  state. 
The  son  supplemented  his  public-school  course  by  study  in  Genesee  College  at 
Lima,  New  York,  from  which  in  due  time  he  was  graduated,  winning  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Science. 

In  1864  Mr.  Gates  came  to  Waterloo,  Iowa,  and  entered  the  law  office  of 
Bagg  &  Allen  for  the  study  of  law,  thinking  to  make  its  practice  his  life  work. 
He  also  secured  employment  in  the  office  of  the  county  recorder  and  treasurer 
and  thus  met  his  living  expenses  while  preparing  for  the  bar.  In  1866  he  was 
elected  county  superintendent  of  schools  of  Black  Hawk  county  but  resigned 
in  1867  to  accept  the  office  of  deputy  clerk  of  the  courts,  which  would  bring 
him  into  more  direct  connection  with  the  work  which  he  ultimately  wished  to 
follow.  He  served  in  that  position  and  as  deputy  county  auditor  until  1872, 
when  he  was  elected  clerk  of  the  court,  remaining  as  the  incumbent  of  that 
office  for  four  terms  or  eight  years.  In  1877  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and 
when  he  left  the  office  of  clerk  of  the  courts  he  took  up  the  practice  of  law, 
becoming  the  junior  member  in  1881  of  the  firm  of  Alford  &  Gates,  which 
relation  was  maintained  until  1900,  when  Mr.  Alford  died.  Six  months  later 
the  firm  of  Gates,  Hanson  &  Liffring  was  formed  and  that  association  was 
maintamed  for  two  years,  when  Mr.  Hanson  removed  to  California,  since  which 
time  the  firm  has  been  Gates  &  Liffring.  They  are  accorded  a  liberal  share  of 
the  work  done  in  the  courts  and  their  clientage  is  not  only  large  but  of  a  dis- 
tinctively representative  character,  connecting  them  with  much  important  liti- 
gation. The  thoroughness  with  which  Mr.  Gates  prepares  his  work  is  one  of 
the  strongest  elements  in  his  success.  He  is  especially  efficient  in  probate  cases, 
and  many  times  he  has  been  executor  or  attorney  for  executors  in  the  settle- 
ment of  estates.  Aside  from  his  professional  interests  and  duties  he  is  a  director 
of  the  Fairview  Cemetery  Association,  a  director  of  the  Sans  Souci  Associa- 
tion, and  a  director  and  treasurer  of  the  Waterloo  Chautauqua  &  Bible  Institute. 

On  the  1 6th  of  March,  1864,  in  Wayne  county,  New  York,  Mr.  Gates  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Adelia  St.  John,  one  of  his  classmates  in  Genesee 
College.  To  them  were  born  five  children,  two  of  whom  survive:  John  Howard 
Gates,  a  graduate  of  Iowa  University,  who  is  now  one  of  the  judges  of  the 
supreme  court  ot  South  Dakota ;  and  Fanny  Cook  Gates,  a  graduate  of  North- 


Vol.  II— 11 


204  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

western  University  of  Evanston,  Illinois,  of  the  class  of  1894.  Later  Bryu 
Mawr  College  conferred  upon  her  the  Ph.  D.  degree.  In  1898  she  became  pro- 
fessor of  physics  in  Goucher  College  at  Baltimore,  Maryland,  and  after  twelve 
years  spent  in  that  connection  she  entered  the  Chicago  University  for  further 
study.  In  19 13  she  was  made  dean  of  women  in  Grinnell  College  at  Grinnell, 
Iowa,  where  she  still  remains.  Mrs.  Adelia  Gates  passed  away  February  1, 
1874,  and  on  the  17th  of  May,  1877,  in  Rochester,  New  York,  Mr.  Gates  was 
again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Miss  Sarah  Frances  Rumsey,  who 
was  an  intimate  friend  of  his  first  wife.  They  have  an  adopted  daughter,  Helen 
Teresa  Gates,  a  graduate  of  Iowa  State  Teachers  College,  later  a  kindergarten 
teacher  in  Galesburg,  Illinois,  and  now  a  student  in  Chicago  Kindergarten  College. 
Mr.  Gates  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and  meas- 
ures of  the  republican  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Middle  West  Chapter 
of  Alden  Kindred  of  xA.merica,  being  a  direct  descendant  of  John  Alden.  He 
belongs  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  since  1865  has  served  on  the 
official  board  of  Grace  church,  while  for  a  third  of  a  century  he  was  secretary 
of  the  board  and  recording  steward.  He  has  been  a  generous  contributor  to 
the  support  of  the  church  and  has  done  everything  in  his  power  to  further  its 
interests  and  extend  its  influence.  He  was  for  fifteen  years  a  member  of  the 
Waterloo  school  board  and  for  nine  years  of  that  time  he  was  its  president. 
He  is  interested  in  all  those  plans  and  projects  for  the  uplift  and  benefit  of  human- 
ity. His  life  has  ever  been  actuated  by  broad  humanitarian  principles  that  have 
prompted  him  on  many  occasions  to  extend  a  helping  hand.  He  is  today  one 
of  the  old-time  residents  of  Waterloo,  inasmuch  as  his  connection  with  the  city 
covers  a  half  century,  and  throughout  the  entire  period  he  has  been  a  helpful 
factor  in  all  that  has  pertained  to  its  upbuilding. 


ANDREW  McELHINNEY. 

In  presenting  the  life  record  of  Andrew  McElhinney  we  give  to  our  readers 
the  history  of  one  who  was  widely  and  favorably  known  in  Black  Hawk  county. 
Although  of  Scotch  ancestry,  Mr.  McElhinney  was  born  in  Donegal,  Ireland, 
March  13,  1829,  and  was  one  of  a  family  of  eight  children,  the  only  survivor 
being  his  brother,  Charles  McElhinney,  of  Waterloo.  Until  he  was  fourteen 
years  old  he  attended  the  local  schools,  performed  duties  required  in  the  house- 
hold and  grew  up  with  the  rude  health  an  active  busy  life  on  a  farm  produces. 
He  made  the  best  use  of  the  limited  opportunities  for  education,  which  he 
acquired  through  reading  and  contact  with  aftairs. 

In  the  spring  of  1850  Andrew  and  his  brother  David  left  the  old  home  and 
three  months  later  landed  in  Philadelphia.  From  May  until  August  they  worked 
on  a  farm  at  seven  dollars  a  month  and  then  went  to  Oil  Creek,  where  they 
were  accepted  as  employes  in  the  White  Oak  Mills,  where  they  worked  at  lum- 
bering for  two  years.  Their  success  brought  two  other  brothers,  Patrick  and 
William,  to  join  them,  and  all  worked  together  at  Wild  Cat  Mills  for  six  years. 
There  is  no  doubt  that  Andrew  was  the  moving  spirit  which  brought  with  him 
Patrick  and  William  on  a  prospecting  tour  to  the  west  in  1855.     ^'^  business 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  205 

instinct  suggested  to  him  the  purchasing  of  a  tract  of  the  fertile  land  which 
rolled  miles  and  miles  away  over  the  prairie,  and  the  three  brothers  together 
secured  a  section  of  land  in  Tama  county,  Iowa,  Andrew  entering  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  in  Geneseo  township,  at  one  dollar  and  twenty-five  cents  an 
acre.  He  then  went  back  to  the  lumber  regions  but  returned  to  his  property 
in  the  spring  of  1858,  broke  his  land  and  engaged  George  Slade,  another  pioneer, 
to  assist  in  the  building  of  what  was  the  first  frame  house  put  up  in  the  town- 
ship. That  fall  found  him  back  again  in  the  Pennsylvania  lumber  regions.  His 
return  in  the  following  year  was  with  his  wife,  and  they  settled  on  his  farm  in 
Tama  county,  which  remained  their  home  for  thirty-one  years. 

A  man  so  self-reliant,  fearless  and  capable  soon  took  his  natural  place 
among  his  fellow  citizens,  and  during  his  residence  in  that  part  of  the  county 
Mr.  McElhinney  filled  every  local  office.  He  served  as  postmaster,  assessor, 
trustee  and  school  director  and  declined  other  positions  of  greater  responsibility, 
his  personal  affairs  having  commenced  to  weigh  heavily  upon  his  time.  Having 
added  to  his  holdings  from  time  to  time  he  became  the  owner  of  eight  hundred 
and  eighty  acres  of  as  fine  land  as  could  be  found  in  Tama  county  and  this  he 
brought  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  added  to  it  many  modern  improve- 
ments. 

With  the  desire  to  better  educate  his  children  and  still  keep  them  in  the  fam- 
ily circle  he  retired  from  the  farm  in  1890  and  removed  to  Waterloo,  where  he 
purchased  what  was  known  as  the  Mabie  home  on  the  corner  of  Lime  and  High 
streets,  but  in  July,  1890,  he  bought  the  Krapfel  home  at  427  East  Fifth  street, 
where  he  lived  until  his  death  and  which  is  now  owned  and  occupied  by  his 
youngest  daughter  Tressa. 

It  was  back  in  Pennsylvania  that  Mr.  McElhinney  first  met  his  wife  and 
was  married  January  11,  1859,  to  Nancy  Achsah  Smith,  at  Tidioute,  Pennsyl- 
vania. She  was  an  only  daughter  of  Peter  Smith  and  had  two  brothers,  Hugh, 
now  living  at  Reeds  Springs,  Missouri ;  and  John,  who  died  at  Guys  Mills,  Penn- 
sylvania, December  21,  191 2.  Mrs.  McElhinney  was  a  descendant  of  the  original 
Smiths  of  Virginia.  She  was  born  in  Tidioute,  Pennsylvania,  June  21,  1834,  and 
passed  away  at  the  family  home  in  Waterloo,  Iowa,  November  9,  1914,  leaving 
two  sons  and  two  daughters,  while  three  of  her  children  passed  away  in  infancy. 
Estella  J.,  the  eldest,  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  H.  H.  Hanna  of  Waterloo.  Fayette  F., 
the  oldest  son,  was  married  October  12,  1905,  to  Dessie  Anderson  and  lives 
in  Waterloo.  Byron  W.  lives  at  Goldfield,  Iowa,  and  was  married  July  3,  1899, 
to  Fanny  Agnes  King.     Tressa,  the  youngest,  is  single  and  lives  in  the  old  home. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  McElhinney  was  a  stalwart  republican,  as  are  also 
his  two  sons.  Fraternally  he  was  a  Mason,  having  joined  the  order  in  1868, 
at  La  Porte  City,  where  he  was  made  a  Master  Mason.  After  coming  to 
Waterloo  he  transferred  his  membership  to  the  Waterloo  lodge  and  until  failing 
health  prevented  he  was  a  regular  attendant,  believing  in  its  principles  and 
adopting  them  as  one  of  his  charts  of  life.  A  man  of  strict  integrity,  his  busi- 
ness was  conducted  "on  the  square."  He  was  a  man  of  upright  life  and  clean 
past.  He  will  always  be  recalled  as  he  was  in  his  last  moments — kind,  genial 
and  even  gay,  concerned  for  the  comforts  of  others  rather  than  himself.  In 
his  charming  home,  where  he  was  seen  at  his  best,  he  spent  many  happy,  restful 
hours,  when  with  the  cares  of  business  laid  aside,  he  would  show  those  attrac- 


206  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

tive  attributes  which  made  him  so  dearly  beloved  by  his  family  and  admired  by 
the  hosts  of  friends  whom  it  was  his  pleasure  to  hospitably  entertain.  From 
boyhood  he  had  been  a  consistent  member  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church, 
and  had  long  been  one  of  the  vestrymen  of  Christ  church,  Waterloo,  and  one 
of  its  most  liberal  benefactors. 

Air.  McElhinney  was  one  of  the  original  stockholders  in  the  Union  Mill 
Company  and  served  as  a  director  of  that  corporation  from  1873,  when  the  com- 
pany was  reorganized,  until  the  time  of  his  death  and  for  many  years  was 
president.  He  was  also  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Waterloo,  of 
which  financial  institution  he  was  for  many  years  vice  president.  He  was  also 
a  stockholder  of  the  Waterloo  Improvement  Company,  which  controlled  and 
improved  the  Logan  House  property,  which  is  now  owned  and  occupied  by  the 
James  Black  Dry  Goods  Company.  He  had  other  large  interests  in  various 
business  ventures  in  Waterloo.  An  important  financial  interest  was  the  Citizens 
State  Bank  of  Goldfield.  Iowa,  which  he  founded  and  of  which  he  was  president, 
his  successor  being  his  son  Fayette  until  about  four  years  ago,  when  Tressa  was 
elected  president  and  Byron  W'.  cashier,  and  they  are  still  serving  in  that 
capacity. 

Mr.  McElhinney  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to  come 
to  America  when  a  young  man  of  twenty-one  years.  He  had  no  unwarranted 
opinion  that  fortune  was  to  be  had  here  for  the  asking,  but  he  became  familiar 
with  the  eternal  principle  that  industry  wins,  and  he  made  industry  the  beacon 
light  of  his  life.  As  he  passed  on  his  energy  and  determination  overcame  many 
difficulties  and  obstacles  in  his  path  and  the  honesty  of  his  purpose  commanded 
for  him  the  respect,  confidence  and  goodwill  of  all.  His  memory  is  cherished 
by  those  who  knew  him,  for  he  was  not  only  a  progressive  and  reliable  business 
man  but  was  a  faithful  friend,  a  loyal  citizen  and  a  devoted  husband  and  father. 
His  wife,  too,  shared  in  the  high  respect  which  was  uniformly  accorded  to  Mr. 
McElhinney  and  was  indeed  a  true  helpmate.  Much  of  his  success  he  attributed 
to  his  loving  wife,  and  they  both  did  many  good  deeds  for  those  who  need 
assistance  on  life's  journey.  Mr.  McElhinney  passed  away  at  his  home  July  3, 
1903. 

Mr.  McElhinney  was  ably  assisted  in  his  work  by  his  youngest  daughter  Tressa, 
who  assisted  him  for  years  in  looking  after  his  financial  interests,  and  as  he 
grew  more  feeble  she  more  and  more  largely  assumed  the  responsibility  in 
business  matters  and  readily  showed  her  splendid  executive  ability,  unfaltering 
enterprise  and  keen  insight.  She  acquired  her  early  education  in  the  country' 
school  and  afterward  attended  the  Toledo  high  school,  of  which  she  is  a  gradu- 
ate. Later  she  pursued  a  course  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College,  from  which 
she  gradviated,  and  she  completed  a  four  years  Chautauqua  and  scientific  course, 
doing  the  reading  in  her  own  home.  In  1907  finding  the  need  for  a  practical 
banking  experience  she  procured  employment  at  the  Black  Hawk  National 
Bank,  having  charge  of  the  savings  department.  She  always  felt  this  was  a 
great  benefit  to  her  in  her  private  interests  as  it  gave  her  a  broader  knowledge 
of  business.  She  had  charge  of  her  mother's  business  and  her  own  and  has 
large  financial  interests  in  Waterloo.  She  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Waterloo  & 
Cedar  Falls  Union  Mill  Company,  and  one  of  the  largest  stockholders  in  the 
First   National    Bank ;   also   has   stock   in   Rath    Packing   Company   and   in   the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  207 

Black  Hawk  National  Bank  and  in  the  Citizens  State  Bank  of  Goldfield,  Iowa, 
being  president  of  the  last  named.  She  has  worked  some  in  real  estate,  having 
built  and  now  owns  a  number  of  residences  which  she  rents,  deriving  therefrom 
a  substantial  annual  income.  She  has  a  half  interest  in  the  home  farm  of  eight 
hundred  and  eighty  acres,  her  brother  Byron  owning  the  other  half.  She  is 
resourceful,  alert  and  sagacious  and  is  seldom  if  ever  at  fault  in  matters  of  busi- 
ness judgment.  She  readily  discerns  the  possibiHties  of  a  situation  and  advances 
steadily  toward  the  goal  for  which  she  set  out. 

She  possesses  a  singular  modesty  and  simplicity  of  manner.  There  is  no 
ostentation  about  anything  she  says  or  does.  When  she  does  a  kindness  or 
performs  a  duty  she  finds  the  sufficient  reason  for  it  in  her  own  breast  and  has 
no  desire  to  have  it  heralded  abroad.  She  is  prominent  in  club  and  social 
circles,  having  been  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Woman's  Club,  and  she  is 
now  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  fine  arts  department  of  the  Woman's  Club 
and  was  president  of  the  Westminster  guild  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  has 
filled  dififerent  offices  in  the  Eastern  Star. 


ALFRED  A.  HOFFMANN,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Alfred  A.  Hofifmann  is  practicing  in  Waterloo  as  a  member  of  the  well 
known  and  prominent  firm  of  O'Keefe,  Brown  &  Hofifmann.  His  ability  as  a 
physician  has  gained  him  high  rank  and  his  skill  is  being  constantly  augmented  by 
further  reading  and  broad  experience.  He  was  born  in  Dubuque,  Iowa,  Feb- 
ruary II,  1891,  a  son  of  Mathias  and  Mary  (Voelker)  Hofi'mann,  both  of  whom 
were  natives  of  Dubuque,  in  which  city  the  father  conducted  one  of  the  pio- 
neer undertaking  establishments,  having  now  been  engaged  in  business  there  for 
thirty-five  years.  He  is  a  past  president  of  the  Iowa  Funeral  Directors  Asso- 
ciation. His  wife  also  survives  and  they  were  the  parents  of  nine  children: 
Leo  A.,  who  is  now  engaged  in  the  undertaking  business  in  Omaha,  Nebraska ; 
Martha,  the  wife  of  Dr.  H.  R.  Thill,  of  Dubuque,  Iowa  ;  Mary,  the  wife  of 
M.  J.  Grace,  a  deputy  clerk  of  the  courts  in  Dubuque;  Sister  Mary  Jeanette, 
of  the  Franciscan  Convent  of  Dubuque;  Mathias  M.,  who  has  joined  the  priest- 
hood and  is  assistant  pastor  of  St.  Francis  church  at  Dyersville,  Iowa:  Alfred 
A.;  Herbert  J.,  a  law  student  in  the  lowa  University  at  Iowa  City;  Alois  M., 
who  is  attending  Dubuque  College:  and  Txlartin  H.,  also  a  student  in  that  insti- 
tution. 

Dr.  Hoftmann  was  reared  in  Dubuque  to  the  age  of  eighteen  years  and  was 
a  student  in  St.  Joseph's  College  to  the  age  of  seventeen.  He  then  began  prepa- 
ration for  his  profession  in  the  department  of  medicine  of  the  Creighton  Uni- 
versity at  Omaha,  Nebraska,  where  he  remained  as  a  student  for  four  years 
and  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1912.  The  M.  D.  degree  was  then  con- 
ferred upon  him,  after  which  he  went  to  Denver,  Colorado,  and  was  an  interne 
in  St.  Anthony's  Hospital  for  a  year,  gaining  broad  practical  experience  through 
hospital  practice  with  its  varied  opportunities  and  demands.  He  then  came  to 
Waterloo  and  entered  the  St.  Francis  Hospital  as  an  interne,  remaining  in 
that  position  for  a  year.    On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  joined  Dr.  O'Keefe 


208  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  Dr.  Brown  in  a  partnership  that  led  to  the  adoption  of  the  present  firm  name 
of  O'Keefe,  Brown  &  Hofifmann.  He  now  has  charge  of  the  X-ray  department 
at  the  St.  Francis  Hospital  at  Waterloo  in  connection  with  the  conduct  of  a 
general  practice  which  is  now  extensive  and  important.  The  offices  of  the 
firm  are  located  in  a  suite  of  rooms  in  the  Commercial  Bank  building. 

Dr.  Hofifmann  holds  membership  in  the  Catholic  church  and  with  the  Knights 
of  Columbus.  He  comes  of  a  family  that  has  adhered  to  the  democratic  faith 
in  politics  and  he,  too,  is  an  advocate  of  the  party.  He  belongs  to  the  Phi  Beta 
Pi,  a  medical  fraternity,  and  along  strictly  professional  lines  is  connected  with 
the  Waterloo  Medical  Society  and  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society. 
Although  but  a  young  man,  he  has  already  attained  a  most  creditable  position 
in  professional  circles  that  many  an  older  practitioner  might  well  envy. 


GEORGE  S.  FERGUSON. 

It  is  an  unusual  thing  that  four  brothers  of  a  family  should  continue  in  busi- 
ness together,  for  conditions  and  individual  tastes  usually  separate  them.  How- 
ever, in  the  Ferguson  family,  which  has  been  represented  in  this  county  since 
1868,  there  are  four  brothers  who  are  partners  in  the  ownership  of  the  business 
conducted  under  the  name  of  the  Ferguson  Manufacturing  Company.  One  of 
these  brothers  is  he  whose  name  introduces  this  review  and  who  throughout  the 
greater  period  of  his  active  business  life  has  been  connected  with  industrial 
pursuits.  He  was  born  m  Bradford  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1862,  a  son  of 
Edward  and  Isabelle  (Cummings)  Ferguson,  who  are  mentioned  at  length  on 
another  page  of  this  work  in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  Albert  R.  Ferguson. 
The  family  arrived  in  this  county  in  1868,  when  George  S.  Ferguson  was  but  a 
little  lad,  and  their  home  was  established  on  a  farm  eight  miles  northeast  of 
Waterloo. 

George  S.  Ferguson  attended  the  district  schools  of  Bennington  township 
and  afterward  became  a  student  in  the  Prairie  Home  Seminary.  He  worked  in 
the  fields  when  not  busy  with  his  text-books  and  remained  at  home  until  twenty- 
one  years  of  age,  when  he  went  to  South  Dakota,  where  he  took  up  a  claim  and 
in  connection  with  its  development  operated  a  well  drilling  machine  for  one 
year.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  returned  to  Iowa,  where  he  engaged  in  the 
creamery  business  for  about  three  years.  He  next  purchased  a  drilling  machine 
and  devoted  the  succeeding  five  years  to  drilling  wells.  At  the  end  of  that  time 
he  was  employed  as  a  traveling  salesman  by  the  Kelley  &  Tannehill  Company 
and  represented  that  house  upon  the  road  for  about  fifteen  years,  his  long  con- 
tinued connection  with  the  business  indicating  his  capability  and  his  faithfulness 
to  the  trust  reposed  in  him  by  his  employers.  Others  of  the  family  w^ere  also  in 
the  employ  of  the  firm,  to  whom  the  name  of  Ferguson  stood  as  a  synonym  for 
reliability  and  capability.  On  leaving  the  road  George  S.  Ferguson  joined  his 
l)rothers  in  the  organization  of  the  Ferguson  Manufactviring  Company  and  has 
since  been  general  manager  of  the  business,  which  is  that  of  manufacturing  well 
drilling  machinery  and  supplies.  His  early  experience  in  well  drilling  stands 
him  in  good  stead  in  this  connection,  having  brought  to  him  a  practical  knowl- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  209 

edge  of  the  work  to  be  done  by  the  machinery  which  his  company  now  manu- 
factures. He  concentrates  his  energies  upon  this  business  and  his  close  appli- 
cation and  keen  insight  have  been  factors  in  its  growing  success. 

On  the  23d  of  December,  1894,  Mr.  Ferguson  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Katherine  Lemper,  who  was  born  in  Galena,  Illinois,  a  daughter  of  Paul 
and  Anna  (Cawthorn)  Lemper,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Illinois,  whence 
they  came  to  Iowa  when  Waterloo  was  a  village  and  gave  little  promise  of  ever 
reaching  its  present  metropolitan  size  and  conditions.  However,  they  took  up 
their  abode  in  Waterloo  and  the  father  engaged  in  the  hardware  business,  in 
which  he  continued  until  a  few  years  prior  to  his  death,  which  occurred  in  the 
latter  '80s.  His  widow  still  resides  in  Waterloo,  occupying  the  old  home  on 
Franklin  street.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ferguson  have  one  son,  Paul  L.,  who  is  now  a 
high-school  pupil.  They  occupy  an  attractive  residence  at  No.  302  Mobile 
street  which  Mr.  Ferguson  owns,  together  with  other  real  estate  in  this  city. 

He  belongs  to  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Brotherhood  of 
American  Yeomen.  He  usually  votes  the  democratic  ticket  although  he  is  inde- 
pendent in  his  political  views  and  actions.  At  one  time  he  served  as  township 
clerk  of  Bennington  township,  but  he  cares  little  for  public  office,  preferring  to 
concentrate  his  efforts  and  attention  upon  other  interests.  He  belongs  to  Grace 
Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  high  and  honorable  principles  guide  him  in  all 
life's  relations. 


HENRY  F.  HOPPE. 


Henry  F.  Hoppe  is  the  owner  of  a  valuable  property  of  one  hundred  and 
eighty-six  acres  situated  on  sections  4  and  5,  Spring  Creek  township.  He  also 
has  other  real-estate  holdings  in  the  county  and  his  land  is  the  visible  evidence 
of  a  life  of  well  directed  energy  and  thrift.  He  was  born  in  Germany,  October 
5,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  Carl  L.  and  Christina  (Tebbe)  Hoppe,  who  are  men- 
tioned in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  C.  F.  Hoppe,  on  another  page  of  this 
work. 

The  usual  experiences  of  the  farm  lad  fell  to  the  lot  of  Henry  F.  Hoppe 
during  his  boyhood  and  youth.  He  was  but  five  years  of  age  when  his  parents 
came  to  the  new  world  and  therefore  he  was  practically  reared  as  well  as  edu- 
cated in  Black  Hawk  county,  attending  the  parochial  and  district  schools.  He  re- 
mained at  home  until  he  reached  the  age  of  thirteen  years  and  then  started  out 
in  life  on  his  own  account,  living  by  working  as  a  farm  hand.  He  was  thus 
employed  for  eight  years,  during  which  time  he  practiced  frugality  as  well  as 
industry  and  acquired  the  capital  that  enabled  him  to  purchase  eighty  acres  of 
land  in  Spring  Creek  township.  For  five  years  he  resided  upon  that  farm  and 
continued  its  cultivation,  after  which  he  removed  to  Waterloo,  where  he  engaged 
in  teaming  for  a  year  and  a  half.  He  next  entered  the  employ  of  the  W.  E. 
Closson  Medicine  Company  as  traveling  agent  and  was  for  five  years  thus  en- 
gaged. He  then  resumed  agricultural  pursuits,  returning  to  Spring  Creek  town- 
ship. At  that  time  he  purchased  the  old  Seaman  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
eighty-six  acres  on  sections  4  and  5  and  in  the  intervening  years  he  has  culti- 


210  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

vated  this  place  and  has  added  to  it  various  modern  improvements  which  make 
it  one  of  the  splendid  farm  properties  of  the  district.  It  presents  a  neat  and 
thrifty  appearance  and  the  well  tilled  fields  annually  return  golden  harvests. 
The  place  is  well  fenced  and  is  divided  into  fields  of  convenient  size  in  which  are 
raised  exxellent  crops  of  corn,  wheat  and  other  cereals.  Mr.  Hoppe  still  owns 
his  original  eighty  acres  on  section  9  and  from  his  property  derives  a  substantial 
annual  income. 

Mr.  Hoppe  is  the  secretary  for  La  Porte  City  district  of  the  Maxfield  Insur- 
ance Company.  He  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  democratic  party  and  keeps  well  informed  on  the  questions  and 
issues  of  the  day  and  is  ever  ready  to  support  his  position  by  intelligent  argu- 
ment. He  does  not  seek  office,  however,  preferring  that  others  should  win  the 
political  positions.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Lutheran  church.  He  is 
truly  a  self-made  man,  for  from  the  early  age  of  thirteen  years  he  has  been 
dependent  upon  his  own  resources.  At  a  period  when  most  boys  are  in  school 
he  was  earning  his  living  and  smce  that  time  he  has  had  few  idle  hours,  his  dili- 
gence, determination  and  sound  business  judgment  bringing  to  him  the  success 
which  he  now  enjoys. 


JOHN  SMELSER. 


For  the  past  two  decades  John  Smelser  has  lived  retired  in  La  Porte  City, 
but  for  a  number  of  years  he  was  energetically  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits.' 
He  was  born  in  Tennessee  in  October,  1826,  a  son  of  Henry  and  Betsy  (King) 
Smelser,  natives  of  Tennessee  and  \'irginia  respectively.  The  father  was^a 
farmer  and  cultivated  land  in  the  Big  Bend  state  for  some  time.  He  subse- 
quently removed  to  Indiana  with  his  family  and  eventually  to  Benton  county, 
Iowa,  arriving  there  when  that  region  was  still  scarcely  touched  by  civilization! 
He  continued  to  devote  his  energies  to  farm  work  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  1889.     His  wife  died  in  La  Porte  City  in   1882. 

John  Smelser  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  Hoosier  state  and  when  a 
young  man  of  twenty  years  was  there  married  and  began  farming  upon  his  own 
account.  In  1852  he  came  to  this  county  and  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  land,  later  adding  an  additional  forty  acres.  He  improved  his  prop- 
erty, a  part  of  which  is  situated  over  the  line  in  Benton  county,  and  operated 
his  farm  successfully  until  1894,  when  he  retired  and  removed  to  La  Porte  City, 
where  he  has  since  resided,  enjoying  the  leisure  made  possible  by  his  labor  in 
former  years. 

Mr.  Smelser  was  married  in  October,  1846,  to  Miss  Mary  A.  Hogshire,  and 
they  became  the  parents  of  five  children:  John,  a  resident  of  Sioux  Falls,  South 
Dakota ;  Nettie,  who  died  when  an  infant  of  eighteen  months ;  Ernest,  who  lives 
in  Minnesota;  Henry,  residing  in  La  Porte  City  ;  and  a  child  who  died  in  infancy. 
The  wife  and  mother  was  called  to  the  home  beyond  in  1893  and  five  years  later 
Mr.  Smelser  married  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Dooley,  of  La  Porte. 

Mr.  Smelser  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  in  good  standing 
and  contributes  of  his  means  to  the  carrying  on  of  its  work  and  the  spread  of 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  211 

its  influence.  Since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  suffrage  he  has  voted 
the  repubhcan  ticket  and  held  a  number  of  local  offices  while  living  upon  his 
farm,  including  that  of  township  trustee.  As  an  agriculturist  he  was  alert, 
progressive  and  industrious,  and  his  farm  repaid  his  care  and  labor  by  yielding 
abundant  crops,  which  brought  a  good  price  upon  the  market.  His  personality 
is  one  that  inspires  respect  and  confidence,  and  his  probity  and  honor  are  never 
questioned. 


JOSEPH  LEWIS  POWERS,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Joseph  Lewis  Powers,  one  of  the  most  venerable  citizens  of  Iowa,  passed 
away  in  Waterloo  on  the  29th  of  October,  1914,  when  in  the  ninety-first  year  of 
his  age,  but  his  memory  remains  as  a  benediction  and  an  inspiration  to  all  with 
whom  he  came  in  contact,  so  high  were  his  principles,  so  exalted  his  ideals,  so 
generous,  kindly  and  helpful  his  acts.  He  was  born  near  Schenectady,  New 
York,  December  11,  1823,  his  parents  being  Lewis  and  Mehitable  (Whitehead) 
Powers,  natives  of  Vermont.  He  was  three  years  of  age  when  his  parents 
removed  to  Newstead,  New  York,  and  was  a  youth  of  eleven  years  at  the  time 
of  their  emigration  westward  to  Ohio  in  1835.  At  the  age  of  seventeen  years 
he  purchased  his  time  from  his  father  and  through  the  following  two  years 
worked  upon  the  farm. 

Not  content  with  the  educational  opportunities  he  had  thus  far  received,  he 
attended  the  schools  of  Ashland,  Ohio,  and  also  Granville  College,  and  subse- 
quently he  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching.  W'hile  thus  engaged  he  devoted 
his  leisure  hours  to  the  study  of  medicine  and  in  further  preparation  for  prac- 
tice he  attended  the  Starling  Medical  College  at  Columbus,  Ohio,  in  the  years 
1847  a"d  1848.  He  afterward  began  the  practice  of  medicine  at  Blendon,  near 
Columbus,  and  in  1850,  attracted  by  the  discovery  of  gold  in  California,  he  made 
the  long  journey  across  the  plains  to  the  Pacific  coast,  where  he  arrived  after 
traveling  for  one  hundred  and  ten  days.  During  the  succeeding  year  and  a  half 
he  conducted  a  medical  and  surgical  hospital  in  addition  to  his  work  as  a  miner. 
He  then  decided  to  return  to  his  Ohio  home  and  started  eastward  with  eighteen 
hundred  dollars  in  gold,  the  savings  of  his  year  and  a  half.  He  returned  by 
way  of  San  Francisco  and  the  Isthmus  route  to  New  Orleans,  proceeded  up  the 
Mississippi  to  St.  Louis  and  thence  made  his  way  to  Morrow  county,  Ohio, 
where  he  invested  in  two  hundred  acres  of  land.  He  then  rented  his  farm  and 
afterward  started  on  a  three  hundred  mile  horseback  ride  to  the  home  of  his 
affianced  wife,  Jannette  S.  Byam,  who  was  then  living  in  Iowa.  They  were 
married  at  Andrew,  this  state,  on  the  30th  of  December,  1852,  and  immediately 
returned  to  Ohio  to  begin  their  domestic  life  in  a  new  log  house  which  had 
been  erected  on  the  farm.  They  occupied  that  place  for  seven  years  and  there 
their  older  children  were  born.  At  the  end  of  that  time  they  removed  westward 
to  Iowa,  settling  in  Homer  township,  Benton  county,  where  Dr.  Powers  resumed 
the  practice  of  medicine  in  connection  with  the  development  and  improvement 
of  his  farm.  There  he  lived  for  seven  years,  after  which  he  went  to  Irving, 
Iowa,  and  opened  an  office,  concentrating  his  energies  upon  his  practice.     In 


212  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

1876  he  was  graduated  from  the  Keokuk  Medical  College,  which  at  that  time 
was  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Iowa.  In  1878  he  removed  to 
Reinbeck,  where  he  followed  his  profession  for  many  years,  but  after  the  death 
of  his  wife  he  retired  from  active  practice  and  spent  his  last  years  with  his 
children. 

Dr.  Powers  had  two  sons  and  three  daughters :  Dr.  F.  W.  and  L.  E.  Powers, 
both  of  Waterloo;  Mrs.  J.  H.  Welch,  of  Belle  Plaine;  Mrs.  S.  H.  Cranmer,  of 
Minneapolis:  and  Mrs.  J-  A.  \\'ebb.  of  Waterloo,  at  whose  home  he  was  staying 
when  death  called  him. 

Dr.  Powers  was  a  man  of  strong  Christian  faith  and  spirit.  He  thought 
little  of  himself  or  his  own  interests  but  devoted  his  life  to  service  for  his  fam- 
ily and  for  the  uplift  of  humanity.  When  forty-five  years  of  age  he  joined  the 
Methodist  Episcopal  church  at  Irving  and  from  that  time  forward  was  a  very 
active  church  worker,  making  his  religion  a  part  of  his  everyday  existence  and 
not  merely  a  matter  of  Sunday  observance.  On  removing  to  Reinbeck  he  be- 
came a  charter  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  of  that  place  and 
he  ever  endeavored  to  make  his  life  the  expression  of  his  Christian  belief  and 
of  the  teachings  of  Him  who  came  not  to  be  ministered  unto  but  to  minister. 

That  his  life  broadened  in  its  outlook,  in  its  perceptions  and  in  its  purposes 
is  indicated  by  excerpts  from  letters  which  he  wrote  or  from  things  that  he  said. 
At  the  time  of  the  celebration  of  his  silver  wedding  anniversary,  in  responding 
to  the  felicitations  and  best  wishes  of  the  friends  that  had  gathered,  in  addressing 
his  wife  upon  the  part  which  she  had  filled  so  faithfully,  he  said,  among  other 
things,  "As  we  enter  another  quarter  of  a  century  in  the  great  race  of  life,  if  we 
fail  to  reach  the  golden  anniversary  of  our  wedded  life,  may  we  with  these 
friends  receive  a  rich  and  abiding  crown  in  the  Great  Beyond."  Twenty  years 
later,  upon  reaching  his  seventy-fifth  birthday,  in  writing  a  letter  to  one  of  his 
daughters,  he  said:  "As  we  stand  at  the  open  door  of  the  unwritten  future 
with  responsibilities  pressing  hard  for  a  satisfactor)^  solution,  our  riper  experi- 
ence would  dictate  that  duty  performed  may  bring  responsibility,  but  never 
failure  nor  dishonor.  Live  on  the  bright  side  of  life,  pressing  hard  to  the  right, 
that  honest  thought,  abiding  purpose  and  Christian  living  shall  be  an  inspiration 
as  we  make  toward  the  other  shore."  Five  years  later,  at  the  age  of  eighty,  on 
the  occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  golden  wedding  anniversary  of  his  wedded 
life,  in  responding  to  the  greetings  of  friends,  he  said:  "There  are  times  when 
sentiment  lingers  at  the  threshold  of  thought  and  the  tongue  falters ;  and  we 
are  almost  mute  in  attempting  to  put  into  words,  at  such  a  time  as  this,  a  proper 
appreciation  of  abiding  confidence  and  friendship.  Pleasant  memories  remind 
us  that  twenty-five  years  ago  a  number  of  this  company  called  upon  us  and  left 
tokens  of  good-will  on  the  occasion  of  our  silver  wedding.  At  that  time  we 
thought  we  were  nearing  Pisgah's  height  of  human  Hfe;  but  tonight  as  memory 
sweeps  over  a  quarter  of  a  century,  the  flashlight  of  experience  and  duty  reminds 
us  that  we  were  then  only  in  the  foothills  of  life's  mission.  As  I  stand  in  the 
twilight  in  the  coveted  height  of  four  score  years  and  view  the  plain  below,  I 
am  reminded  that  the  heart  treasures  are  the  brightest  pictures  hanging  on  the 
walls  of  memory,  and  richest  fruitage  is  gathered  from  friendship's  altar.  Stand- 
ing at  the  open  door  of  the  unknown  future  and  scanning  the  horizon  of  human 
life,  I  am  glad  that,  amid  all  its  failures,  life  is  not  all  a  dream,  but  is  big  with 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  213 

possibilities  and  hope.  We  must  remember  that  it  is  individual  purpose  and 
effort — leaning  hard  to  the  right — that  gives  coloring  to  character  and  makes 
history  worthy  of  a  place  on  the  tablet  of  memory."  Later,  at  the  age  of  eighty- 
seven,  he  took  some  pleasure  in  composing  a  poem  of  eight  verses  on  "The 
Voyage  of  Life,''  which  he  has  left  to  the  family  in  his  own  handwriting.  One 
of  the  verses  reads  as  follows : 

"Shadows  may  o'ertake  you,  on  the  way. 
And  thus  you  wander,  may  go  astray, 
Bethlehem's  star,  a  light  for  thee, 
To  brighten  hope,  a  guide  at  sea."    ' 

The  year  following  the  death  of  his  wife  he  wrote:  'T  am  floating  on  the 
current  of  time,  and  in  the  passmg  of  my  eighty-eighth  birthday,  I  am  abiding 
my  time  for  the  call  to  come  up  higher."  Upon  the  celebration  of  his  ninetieth 
birthday,  which  was  held  December  ii,  1913,  upon  which  occasion  many  friends 
called  and  extended  their  best  wishes  for  his  future  health  and  happiness,  he 
said,  among  other  things  worthy  of  repetition:  "Self  is  a  mighty  poor  master; 
self  is  the  worst  devil  to  contend  with.  My  advice  to  the  young  is  first,  honesty, 
and  a  high  regard  for  Christianity,  for  their  own  betterment  and  the  betterment 
of  society." 

At  all  times  Dr.  Powers  held  to  the  highest  ideals  and  constantly  put  forth 
effort  for  their  adoption.  The  consensus  of  public  opinion  is  that  his  was  a 
most  earnest  and  consistent  Christian  character.  Llis  presence  as  much  as  his 
professional  aid  constituted  a  stimulus  and  a  blessing  in  the  sick  room.  He  held 
friendship  inviolable ;  he  was  loyal  to  every  duty  and  certainly  the  world  is 
better  for  his  having  lived.  He  came  to  an  honored  old  age  with  few  pages  in 
his  life  record  that  he  might  wish  to  erase ;  on  the  contrary  his  history  is  one 
which  should  serve  to  inspire  and  encourage  others,  as  it  points  out  the  value  of 
character,  of  noble  living  and  of  honorable  purpose. 


T.  C.  KOENEKE. 


J.  C.  Koeneke  is  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Iowa  Real  Estate  &  Invest- 
ment Company  of  Waterloo  and  belongs  to  that  class  of  men  whose  ready  recog- 
nition and  improvement  of  opportunities  have  led  to  their  success.  His  birth 
occurred  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  in  1886,  and,  spending  his  boyhood  and  youth 
there,  he  supplemented  his  early  educational  training  by  study  in  the  Waverly 
high  school  and  afterward  entered  the  State  Agricultural  College  at  Ames,  being 
graduated  from  the  dairy  department  of  that  institution  with  the  class  of  1905. 
He  was  afterward  appointed  milk  inspector  for  the  large  creamery  plant  at 
Litchfield,  Minnesota,  where  he  remained  for  a  year,  and  later  he  became  asso- 
ciated with  his  uncle,  who  was  assistant  dairy  food  commissioner  of  Illinois. 
Some  time  later  he  became  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Iowa  Real  Estate  & 
Investment  Company  of  Waterloo,  which  handles  its  own  property,  building 
factories,    homes   or   any   structure   that   prospective   purchasers    require.      The 


214  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

business  of  the  firm  is  extensive  and  important  and  has  constituted  one  of  the 
effective  and  forceful  elements  in  the  upbuilding  and  progress  of  the  citv.  Me 
has  never  ceased  to  feel  an  interest  in  that  line  of  work  for  which  his  college 
training  qualified  him  and  he  is  now  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
Dairy  Cattle  Congress. 

In  1909  ]\Ir.  Koeneke  was  married  to  Aliss  Hazel  M.  Cass,  a  daughter  of 
J.  F.  Cass,  vice  president  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad 
Company,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Mrginia  Louise. 

Mr.  Koeneke  holds  membership  with  the  Evangelical  church.  His  interest 
in  public  affairs  also  extends  beyond  the  moral  aspect  to  the  upbuilding  of  those 
forces  which  contribute  to  the  welfare  and  progress  of  the  city  along  material 
lines.  To  this  end  he  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade 
and  of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  He  is  a  young  man  of  capability,  alert  and  ener- 
getic, and  has  made  for  himself  a  creditable  position  in  the  business  world. 


L.  P.  SINNARD. 


America  has  aptly  been  termed  the.  land  of  opportunity.  In  a  country  where 
effort  is  unhampered  by  caste  or  class  diligence  and  determination  can  always 
win  recognition.  A  resident  of  Waterloo  for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century, 
having  arrived  in  this  city  in  1888,  L.  P.  Sinnard  is  now  well  known  as  one 
of  the  partners  in  the  firm  of  Sinnard  Brothers,  leading  grocers  of  this  section 
of  the  state. 

Iowa  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Kellogg,  Jas- 
per county,  in  1870.  He  is  a  son  of  Cyrus  and  Emily  Sinnard  and  in  his  early 
boyhood  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal  to  Eddyville.  Iowa,  where  he 
was  reared  to  the  age  of  seventeen  years.  He  afterward  spent  a  year  in  Omaha, 
Nebraska,  and  at  the  age  of  eighteen  came  to  A\'aterloo,  where  he  has  now  resided 
for  twenty-six  years.  He  has  only  been  out  of  the  state  twice  since  that  time 
and  his  close  application  to  business  and  his  unfaltering  energy  have  brought 
him  to  a  conspicuous  and  honorable  position  in  the  trade  circles  of  his  adopted 
city. 

Almost  immediately  after  his  arri\al  here  Air.  Sinnard  entered  the  employ 
of  Morrell  &  Turner,  grocers,  with  whom  he  continued  for  about  five  years. 
He  was  afterward  in  the  employ  of  other  firms  until  the  2d  of  June.  1908,  but 
throughout  the  entire  period  was  actuated  by  a  laudable  desire  of  one  day  en- 
gaging in  business  on  his  own  account.  This  hope  soon  saw  its  fulfilment  when, 
in  1908,  he  and  his  brother  formed  a  partnership  under  the  firm  style  of  Sinnard 
Brothers  and  embarked  in  the  grocery  trade  on  their  own  account  in  Waterloo, 
where  the  firm  name  has  since  become  a  household  word.  They  began  business 
in  a  little  room  on  East  Fifth  street  in  the  Ellis  Hotel  block  and  from  the  begin- 
ning success  attended  their  eft'orts  because  of  their  unremitting  diligence,  their 
earnest  desire  to  please  their  patrons  and  their  thoroughly  reliable  business 
methods.  On  the  ist  of  August,  1912.  they  bought  out  the  grocery  business  of 
A.  H.  Pinkerton  at  No.  216  West  Fourth  street  and  L.  P.  Sinnard  took  charge 
of  this  store  and  there  developed   the  largest   retail  grocery  business   in   West 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  215 

Waterloo.  On  the  ist  of  July,  191 3,  they  removed  their  East  Waterloo  store  to 
the  present  location  at  No.  320  East  Fourth  street,  where  they  have  very  com- 
modious quarters.  That  business  is  in  charge  of  R.  C.  Sinnard,  mention  of 
whom  appears  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  The  Sinnard  Brothers  employ  on  an 
average  of  twenty-eight  salesmen  and  others  to  take  care  of  their  business.  They 
have  four  delivery  wagons  on  the  west  side  and  two  wagons  and  a  large  auto 
truck  for  delivery  on  the  east  side.  Their  trade  has  now  reached  extensive 
proportions,  making  them  the  leading  grocers  of  Waterloo.  They  carry  a  most 
attractive  stock  of  staple  and  fancy  groceries,  furnishing  everything  known  to 
the  trade  in  their  line,  and  their  stock  equals  in  kind  any  to  be  found  in  the 
largest  cities.  In  fact,  their  establishment  would  be  a  credit  to  a  city  of  much 
greater  size  than  Waterloo.  They  have  always  been  most  careful  in  the  stand- 
ard of  goods  carried,  in  the  personnel  of  the  house  and  in  the  treatment  ac- 
corded patrons,  and  as  a  result  of  their  methods  their  business  has  grown  year 
by  year. 

In  1893  Mr.  Sinnard  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Emma  Duke,  who  passed 
away  in  June,  1910,  leaving  three  children:  Marie,  Duke  and  Margery.  Mr. 
Sinnard  belongs  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  to  the  Tribe  of  Ben 
Hur,  to  the  Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security  and  the  Modern  Brotherhood  of 
America.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  the  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association.  He  is,  moreover,  a  public-spirited  citizen  and,  strong  in 
his  individuality,  he  never  lacks  the  courage  of  his  convictions.  He  is  well 
known  for  the  sterling  integrity  and  honor  of  his  character,  which  have  naturally 
gained  for  him  the  respect  and  confidence  of  men.  He  is  widely  and  favorably 
known  throughout  Waterloo  and  Black  Flawk  county  and  his  worth  well  merits 
the  high  regard  which  is  uniformly  given  him. 


JESSE  O.  BURGESS. 


Jesse  O.  Burgess,  one  of  the  honored  veterans  of  the  Civil  war  who  has 
lived  in  well  earned  retirement  at  La  Porte  City  since  1908,  was  for  more  than 
four  decades  actively  and  successfully  identified  with  agricultural  pursuits  in 
Black  Hawk  county.  His  birth  occurred  in  Virginia  on  the  3d  of  December, 
1835,  his  parents  being  Edward  and  Catherine  (Pixler)  Burgess,  the  former  a 
native  of  Pennsylvania  and  the  latter  of  the  Old  Dominion.  They  came  to 
Iowa  in  an  early  day  and  after  residing  for  some  time  in  Allamakee  county  re- 
moved to  Waterloo,  Black  Hawk  county,  the  father  being  here  engaged  in  agri- 
cultural pursuits.  Subsequently  he  returned  to  Allamakee  county,  where  his 
demise  occurred  in  1894,  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  1884. 

Jesse  O.  Burgess  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  state  of  his  nativity  and 
was  a  young  man  of  about  twenty-two  years  when  in  1857  he  removed  with 
his  parents  to  Allamakee  county,  Iowa.  At  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the 
Civil  war  he  enlisted  for  service  with  the  Union  army  as  a  member  of  Company 
I,  Twenty-seventh  Iowa  Infantry,  and  remained  with  that  command  for  three 
years,  holding  the  rank  of  sergeant.     He  participated  in  a  number  of  hotly  con- 


216  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  • 

tested  engagements  and  made  a  most  creditable  military  record,  never  faltering 
in  the  performance  of  any  task  assigned  him.  Following  the  period  of  his  army 
service  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  and  here  carried  on  general  agricultural 
pursurts  continuously  and  successfully  until  1908,  when  he  put  aside  the  active 
work  of  the  fields  and  took  up  his  abode  in  La  Porte  City,  where  he  purchased 
an  attractive  residence  and  has  since  made  iiis  home.  He  also  owns  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Colorado  and  is  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the 
substantial  and  esteemed  citizens  of  his  community. 

On  the  23d  of  August,  1862,  Mr.  Burgess  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Aliss 
Alary  L.  Dibble,  whose  parents  w^ere  natives  of  Vermont  and  New  York  re- 
spectively and  passed  away  in  Pennsylvania.  The  father  devoted  his  time  and 
energies  to  farming  throughout  his  active  business  career.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burgess 
became  the  parents  of  six  children,  namely :  Reuben  A. ;  Lura ;  Otto ;  Cora, 
who  is  deceased;  James;  and  Charles,  a  barber  of  La  Porte  City. 

Mr.  Burgess  has  always  exercised  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the 
men  and  measures  of  the  republican  party,  believing  firmly  in  its  principles. 
In  religious  faith  he  is  a  Alelhodist,  and  he  still  maintains  pleasant  relations 
with  his  old  army  comrades  as  a  member  of  F.  M.  Thompson  Post,  G.  A.  R. 
He  has  now  passed  the  seventy-ninth  milestone  on  life's  journey  and  enjoys  the 
respect  and  veneration  which  should  ever  be  accorded  one  who  has  traveled  thus 
far  on  this  earthly  pilgrimage  and  whose  career  has  been  at  all  times  upright 
and  honorable. 


A.  M.  PLACE. 


A.  M.  Place,  the  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank,  has  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Waterloo  since  1871  and  in  the  intervening  period  of  forty-three  years 
has  advanced  steadily  in  business  circles,  worth  and  ability  winning  him  promo- 
tion trom  time  to  time  until  he  has  reached  his  present  enviable  place  among  the 
financiers  of  Black  Hawk  county.  Fie  was  born  in  Dubuque,  Iowa,  in  1862,  a 
son  of  Thomas  W.  and  Mary  J.  (Alyers)  Place,  who  came  to  Black  Hawk 
county  in  1871  and  are  still  residing  within  its  borders. 

A.  M.  Place  was  at  that  time  a  lad  of  nine  years.     He  at  once  entered  the 
public  schools  of  Waterloo  and  when  his  text-books  w'ere  put  aside  he  imme- 
diately  started   upon   his   business   career,   entering   the   employ   of   the   Illinois 
Central   Railroad   Company   as   telegraph   operator.      He   was    from    1881    until 
1912  associated  with  various  lines  of  railroad  work.     Each  step  in  his  career  was 
a    forward  one   and  each  change  brought  him   larger  responsibilities   and  also 
wider  opportunities.     In  1912  he  was  called  to  the  vice  presidency  of  the  First 
National  Bank  and  is  thus  connected  with  one  of  the  strongest  financial  institu- 
tions of  the  county.     He  is  also  the  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank 
Building    Company    and    is    treasurer   of    the    Marsh-Place    Building    Company, 
which  has  recently  erected  one  of  the  finest  business  structures  of  the  city.     He 
is  likewise  a  director  in  the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Company  and  is  thus  actively 
and  extensively  connected  with  some  of  the  most  important  business  concerns 
of  the  city.     His  worth  and  capability  are  more  and  more  widely  recognized  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  217 

his  cooperation  has  accordingly  been  sought,  while  his  judgment  has  constituted 
an  element  in  the  successful  conduct  of  different  business  institutions. 

In  1900  Mr.  Place  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Madge  Manson,  who  was 
born  and  reared  in  Waterloo.  They  attend  the  Presbyterian  church  and  their 
lives  are  guided  by  high  and  honorable  principles.  Mr.  Place  also  conforms  its 
teachings  to  the  beneficent  spirit  of  Masonry  and  he  has  membership  with  the 
Elks,  with  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  with  the  Country 
Club  of  Waterloo.  His  record  in  every  relation  has  been  so  honorable  that  he 
has  gained  the  confidence  and  goodwill  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been  brought 
in  contact  and  he  is  justly  accorded  a  place  among  the  prominent  and -repre- 
sentative residents  of  Black  Hawk  county. 


CHARLES  J.  BROAD. 


Charles  J.  Broad  is  numbered  with  that  class  of  citizens  in  whose  lives  effort 
and  determination  spell  success.  He  had  no  special  advantages  at  the  outset  of 
his  career  but  he  possessed  determination  and  ambition,  which  are  perhaps  bet- 
ter than  capital,  and  gradually  he  has  worked  his  way  upward  until  he  now 
ranks  with  the  prosperous  farmers  of  Spring  Creek  township.  His  farm  is  on 
sections  25  and  26  and  comprises  one  hundred  and  seventy-five  acres  of  excel- 
lent land,  the  soil  being  very  arable. 

Mr.  Broad  is  a  native  son  of  Wisconsin,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  that 
state  on  the  8th  of  August,  1857,  his  parents  being  J.  M.  and  Polly  (Wells) 
Broad,  the  former  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  the  latter  of  Ohio.  The  father 
was  a  blacksmith  by  trade  and  went  to  Wisconsin  in  an  early  day.  He  there 
engaged  in  blacksmithing  until  i860,  when  he  came  with  his  family  to  Black 
Hawk  county,  Iowa,  and  subsequently  established  his  home  near  Brandon, 
Buchanan  county,  where  he  again  worked  at  his  trade  until  his  health  failed. 
He  then  retired  from  active  business  life  and  lived  upon  a  thirteen-acre  tract 
of  land  which  he  owned  near  the  home  of  his  son,  Charles  J.,  remaining  there 
to  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  March,  1891,  when  he  was  seventy 
years  of  age.  Plis  widow  survives  and  is  now  living  upon  that  place  at  the  very 
advanced  age  of  eighty-five  years. 

Charles  J.  Broad  spent  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Iowa,  being 
a  lad  of  but  three  years  when  the  family  left  Wisconsin  and  came  to  this  state. 
He  attended  the  public  schools  and  at  an  early  age  began  providing  for  his  own 
support  in  working  as  a  farm  hand,  thus  spending  several  years.  But  he  was 
ambitious  to  engage  in  business  on  his  own  account  and  at  the  age  of  sixteen 
years  he  rented  land  which  he  cultivated  until  he  had  attained  his  majority. 
During  that  period  he  carefully  saved  his  earnings  and  his  industry  and  economy 
brought  him  the  capital  that  enabled  him  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  to  purchase  a 
small  tract  of  land  on  section  26,  Spring  Creek  township.  To  this  he  kept  adding 
from  time  to  time  as  his  financial  resources  increased  until  within  the  boundaries 
of  his  farm  are  comprised  one  hundred  and  seventy-five  acres  of  fine  land 
situated  on  sections  25  and  26,  the  buildings  being  upon  the  former  section. 
When  the  first  small  tract  came  into  his  possession  he  at  once  began  to  cultivate 


218  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  develop  it  and  has  since  given  his  undivided  attention  to  the  work  of  the 
farm  with  the  result  that  his  labors  have  been  crowned  with  a  gratifying  measure 
of  success.  He  annually  harvests  good  crops  and  he  employs  the  most  modern 
methods  in  tilling  the  soil  and  caring  for  the  harvests.  He  also  has  good  grades 
of  stock  upon  his  place  and  the  farm  is  today  a  valuable  property.  He  is  like- 
wise a  stockholder  in  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Interurban  Railroad 
Company. 

In  April,  1885,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Broad  and  Miss  Celestia  Cramer, 
a  daughter  of  George  and  Lydia  (Parker)  Cramer,  the  former  a  native  of  New 
York  and  the  latter  of  Pennsylvania.  They  came  to  La  Porte  City,  Iowa,  about 
i860,  having  in  the  meantime,  however,  lived  for  a  time  in  Wisconsin.  The 
father  was  a  stonemason  and  worked  at  his  trade  throughout  the  period  of  his 
residence  in  this  county.  He  died  in  November,  1894,  at  the  age  of  sixty  years, 
while  his  wife  passed  away  in  September,  1883,  at  the  age  of  forty-four  years. 
Their  daughter,  Mrs.  Broad,  was  born  in  La  Porte  City  in  October,  1865,  and 
by  her  marriage  became  the  mother  of  four  children :  Fred,  who  is  a  farmer 
of  Spring  Creek  township,  this  county;  Vera,  who  died  March  8,  1904,  at  the 
age  of  sixteen  years ;  Harry,  who  is  married  and  is  operating  a  farm  in  Spring 
Creek  township ;  and  Myrta,  who  is  engaged  in  teaching  school  in  Spring  Creek 
township. 

The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church  and  the 
political  belief  of  Mr.  Broad  is  in  harmony  with  the  platform  of  the  republican 
party.  He  and  his  family  are  widely  and  favorably  known  and  the  hospitality 
of  the  best  homes  of  their  section  of  the  county  is  freely  accorded  them.  They 
display  many  good  traits  of  heart  and  mind  and  have  gained  a  large  circle  of 
warm  friends. 


GEORGE  S.  MORNIN. 


Ability  will  come  to  the  front  anywhere  and  enterprise  is  an  indomitable 
quality  that  will  win  success  in  the  face  of  the  strongest  difficulties.  These 
qualities  are  numbered  among  the  characteristics  of  George  S.  Mornin,  whose 
well  formulated  plans  for  business  have  been  carried  forward  to  successful 
completion,  bringing  him  to  the  presidency  of  the  Security  Trust  &  Savings 
Bank,  of  Cedar  Falls,  which  is  one  of  the  leading  financial  institutions  of  Black 
Hawk  county.  He  was  born  December  4,  1864,  in  the  city  in  which  he  still 
makes  his  home,  his  parents  being  Peter  D.  and  Caroline  (Noll)  Mornin.  The 
father  was  born  in  the  suburbs  of  Dublin,  Ireland,  and  the  mother  was  born  in 
Pennsylvania  and  came  of  Pennsylvania-Dutch  parentage. 

In  the  year  1854  Peter  D.  Mornin  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  United  States. 
He  was  then  a  young  man  and  following  his  arrival  here  became  associated  with 
John  FI.  Osborn  as  a  sub-contractor  on  the  building  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Read- 
ing Railroad.  He  was  married  in  Newmanstown,  Pennsylvania,  and  in  1858 
came  west  to  Iowa,  traveling  by  stage  from  Dunleath,  at  that  time  the  terminus 
of  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad,  to  Cedar  Falls,  crossing  the  river  here  on  a 
pontoon  bridge.     He  found  but  a  small  village  containing  only  a  few  white  peo- 


GEORGE  S.  MOENIN 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  221 

pie  and  many  Indians.  He  worked  at  whatever  he  could  do  that  would  give  him 
a  living  for  himself  and  wife.  In  later  years  he  was  street  commissioner  of 
Cedar  Falls  for  seven  years  and  for  six  years  served  as  a  member  of  the  city 
council.  He  died  in  July,  1913,  when  more  than  eighty-five  years  of  age,  while 
his  wife  passed  away  in  1906  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years. 

They  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  of  whom  only  George  S.  Mornin 
survives.  He  was  reared  in  Cedar  Falls  and  attended  its  schools,  passing  through 
consecutive  grades  until  he  became  a  high-school  pupil.  When  a  youth  of  seven- 
teen years  he  went  to  work  for  the  Alexander  Graham  Milling  Company,  with 
which  he  was  identified  until  the  mill  was  destroyed  by  fire.  He  afterward  found 
employment  with  F.  L.  Morgan  in  the  drug  business  at  a  salary  of  one  hundred 
and  fifty  dollars  per  year,  and  eventually  passed  the  examination  as  a  pharmacist 
before  the  state  board  without  having  pursued  a  college  course.  This  was  three 
years  after  he  had  undertaken  work  in  Lliat  line.  Later  he  engaged  in  the  drug 
business  on  his  own  account  and  subsequently  organized  the  Cedar  Falls  Drug 
Company,  which  was  developed  under  his  management  to  one  of  the  leading 
business  concerns  of  the  city.  In  1907  he  sold  that  business  to  advantage  and 
in  company  with  F.  W.  Paulger,  on  the  20th  of  January,  1908,  organized  the 
Security  Savings  Bank,  which  was  changed  to  the  Security  Trust  &  Savings 
Bank  after  the  state  legislature  passed  the  bill  allowing  all  banks  to  act  as 
trustees  of  estates.  Mr.  Mornin  was  made  president  of  the  institution  at  the 
time  of  its  organization  and  has  since  served  in  that  capacity. 

Mr.  Mornin  was  married  in  1897  to  Miss  Delia  A.  Dayton,  a  daughter  of 
M.  A.  Dayton,  one  of  the  foremost  residents  of  Cedar  Falls.  Mr.  Mornin  holds 
membership  in  Black  Hawk  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  also  with  the  Ancient  Order 
of  LInited  Workmen,  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of 
the  Cedar  Falls  Commercial  Club  and  ranks  with  the  city's  leading  residents. 
His  business  ability  finds  practical  demonstration  in  his  success.  He  started 
out  in  life  empty-handed,  resolving  that  he  would  win  for  himself  a  creditable 
place  in  business  circles.  He  has  never  allowed  difficulties  or  obstacles  to  dis- 
courage him ;  on  the  contrary  he  has  regarded  them  rather  as  an  impetus  for 
renewed  effort  on  his  part  and  today  he  is  classed  with  those  men  for  whom 
opportunity  has  spelled  success  and  who,  in  promoting  their  own  advancement, 
have  also  contributed  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  district  in  which  they  live. 


CLAYTON  L.  HOLDEN. 

A  city  that  is  growing  as  rapidly  as  Waterloo  and  has  such  excellent  business 
advantages  and  opportunities  naturally  must  have  first  class  hotels  in  order  to 
meet  the  demands  of  the  traveling  public.  Waterloo  is  not  lacking  in  this  par- 
ticular and  two  of  the  excellent  hostelries  of  the  city  are  under  the  control  of 
the  Horton-Holden  Hotel  Company,  of  which  Clayton  L.  Holden  is  the  secre- 
tary and  treasurer.  He  is  acting  as  manager  of  the  Ellis  Hotel  and  has  for 
four  years  been  well  known  as  a  factor  in  the  business  life  of  the  community. 

He  was  born  near  Erie,  Pennsylvania,  and  was  reared  in  that  state,  while 

its  public  schools  afforded  him  his  educational  privileges.     He  was  about  twenty- 
voi.  n— 12 


222  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

two  years  of  age  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Reed  House  of  Erie,  and 
later  was  connected  with  the  Palace  Hotel  of  North  East,  Pennsylvania.  From 
his  initial  step  he  made  constant  advancement  and  at  dififerent  periods  success- 
fully conducted  hotels  in  Cleveland  and  Conneaut,  Ohio,  and  in  Chicago.  He 
afterward  managed  a  hotel  for  the  Phelps  Dodge  Company  at  Morenci,  Arizona. 
Going  to  Omaha,  Nebraska,  he  there  had  charge  of  the  Country  Club.  He  was 
also  made  manager  of  the  Midlothian  Country  Club  of  Chicago  and  has  been  in 
charge  of  the  Ellis  Hotel  in  Waterloo  since  its  establishment.  In  hotel  manage- 
ment he  displays  many  of  the  methods  of  the  pioneer  in  that  he  introduces  new 
ideas  and  with  initiative  spirit  meets  changing  conditions.  He  is  always  courteous 
and  obliging  to  the  patrons  of  the  hotel  and  at  the  same  time  is  most  careful 
and  businesslike  in  management  and  control. 

In  1912  Mr.  Holden  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Helen  Nelson,  of  Chi- 
cago, and  they  have  gained  many  friends  during  the  period  of  their  residence 
in  W^aterloo.  Mr.  Holden  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of 
Trade.  His  business  interests  have  made  him  widely  known  throughout  the 
country  and  he  has  the  happy  faculty  of  winning  the  friendship  and  high  regard 
of  all  with  whom  he  is  brought  in  contact.  Waterloo  has  reason  to  be  con- 
gratulated upon  winning  him  to  the  ranks  of  its  citizens  and  hotel  life  here  has 
become  much  more  pleasing  and  attractive  because  of  his  identification  there- 
with, as  long  experience  has  taught  him  the  needs  and  demands  of  the  traveling 
public. 


JOHN  GOODFELLOW. 


John  Goodfellow  is  now^  living  retired  in  La  Porte  City,  enjoying  a  rest 
which  he  has  truly  earned  and  richly  deserves,  for  through  forty  years  he  has 
been  actively  identified  with  farming  interests  in  Black  Hawk  county  and  has 
won  his  prosperity  through  unfaltering  industry  and  the  capable  management 
of  his  business  affairs.  He  was  born  in  Ireland  in  December,  1838,  a  son  of 
George  and  Ann  (McCormack)  Goodfellow,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Ireland,  in  which  country  the  father  followed  the  occupation  of  farming.  He 
always  remained  a  resident  of  that  country  and  the  mother  also  passed  aw^ay  on 
the  green  isle  of  Erin. 

John  Goodfellow  was  reared  and  educated  in  Ireland  and  at  the  age  of 
nineteen  years  bade  adieu  to  friends  and  native  country  and  sailed  for  America 
in  1857.  He  settled  first  on  Long  Island,  where  he  remained  for  two  years, 
and  at  the  end  of  that  time  removed  to  the  Mississippi  valley,  establishing  his 
home  in  Ogle  county,  Illinois.  There  he  secured  employment  as  a  farm  hand, 
working  in  the  fields  until  after  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war.  He  watched 
with  interest  the  progress  of  events  in  the  south  and  felt  that  the  Confederacy 
had  no  right  to  attempt  the  overthrow  of  the  Union.  Accordingly,  his  patriotic 
spirit  aroused,  he  enlisted  in  August,  1862,  as  a  member  of  Company  H.  Thirty- 
fourth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served  until  July  31,  1865.  He  was 
wounded  in  the  left  hip  and  also  lost  a  finger  in  battle.     He  participated  in  a 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  223 

number  of  hotly  contested  engagements  and  never  hesitated  to  follow  the  nation's 
starry  banner,  making  a  most  creditable  record  by  his  valor  and  loyalty. 

After  the  war  Mr.  Goodfellow  returned  to  Freeport,  Illinois,  and  was  there 
married.  Subsequently  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  and  purchased  one  hun- 
dred and  twenty  acres  of  land  which  he  at  once  began  to  cultivate  and  improve. 
He  operated  the  farm  for  four  years  and  then  sold  it,  removing  to  Tama  county, 
where  he  purchased  a  farm  which  he  continued  to  cultivate  for  practically  forty 
years.  His  life  was  characterized  by  diligence  and  determination.  He  was  not 
afraid  of  hard  work  and  year  by  year  he  tilled  his  fields  and  cared  for  his  crops. 
Success  attended  him  as  time  passed  on  and  he  is  now  numbered  among  the 
men  of  affluence  in  Black  Hawk  county.  He  retired  and  removed  to  La  Porte 
City,  where  he  purchased  a  fine  residence  near  the  business  district  and  there  he 
has  since  lived,  surrounded  by  many  comforts  and  luxuries  which  have  been 
secured  entirely  through  his  own  efiforts. 

In  January,  1866,  Mr.  Goodfellow  Vv^as  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ann  Fay, 
a  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Winnifred  (Kelly)  Fay,  who  were  natives  of  Ireland 
and  came  to  the  LTnited  States  in  1842.  They  settled  first  at  Albany,  New  York, 
where  they  remained  for  seven  years,  after  which  they  removed  westward  to 
Freeport,  Illinois,  where  Mr.  Fay  operated  a  farm  throughout  his  remaining 
days.  His  death  occurred  July  i,  1905,  while  his  wife  passed  away  Janaury  10, 
1890.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goodfellow  were  born  eight  children,  George,  John,  Jr., 
Mary  E.,  Anna,  William,  Jennie,  Winnifred  and  Alice.  Of  these  Anna  died  in 
1871. 

Mr.  Goodfellow  is  still  the  owner  of  valuable  farming  property,  including 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Tama  county  and  a  quarter  section  across 
the  road  in  Benton  county,  and  from  this  property  he  derives  a  substantial  annual 
income.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Episcopal  church,  while  his  wife  be- 
longs to  the  Catholic  church.  Politically  he  is  a  republican,  having  always  in- 
dorsed that  party  since  coming  to  the  new  world  and  taking  out  his  naturaliza- 
tion papers.  Fie  belongs  to  F.  M.  Thompson  Post,  G.  A.  R.,  and  has  ever  been 
as  true  and  loyal  to  his  country  as  when  he  followed  the  old  flag  upon  southern 
battlefields.  He  has  never  regretted  his  determination  to  come  to  the  new  world, 
for  he  has  found  here  the  opportunities  which  he  sought  and  in  their  employ- 
ment has  worked  his  way  steadily  upward  until  he  is  numbered  today  among 
the  men  of  affluence  in  Black  Hawk  county.  His  record  may  well  serve  to  in- 
spire and  encourage  others  who  must  start  out  in  life  as  he  did — practically 
empty-handed. 


JAMES  G.  CLARK. 


James  G.  Clark  is  the  junior  partner  in  the  law  firm  of  Williams  &  Clark,  of 
Waterloo.  This  firm  has  been  in  continuous  existence  since  the  ist  of  January, 
1912,  and  has  been  accorded  a  liberal  share  of  the  work  of  the  courts.  Mr. 
Clark  was  born  in  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  in  1886  and  is  a  son  of  F.  G.  and  Jessie 
(Olds)  Clark.    The  father  is  also  a  native  of  this  state,  his  birth  having  occurred 


224  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

in  Floyd  county,  and  for  thirty  years  he  has  been  an  active  and  representative 
business  man  of  Waverly. 

Spending  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental  roof  James  G.  Clark  attended 
the  public  schools  of  Waverly  until  graduated  from  the  high  school  with  the 
class  of  1905.  He  afterward  spent  one  year  in  the  State  University  of  Iowa, 
pursuing  a  course  in  the  liberal  arts  department,  after  which  he  entered  the  law 
department  of  the  same  institution  and  was  graduated  therefrom  with  the  LL.B. 
degree  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1910.  The  same  year  he  was  admitted  to 
practice  in  the  courts  of  Iowa  and  opened  an  office  in  Waverly,  becoming  con- 
nected with  the  firm  of  Dawson  &  Wehrmacher,  with  which  he  was  associated 
from  June,  1910,  until  January,  191 1,  when  he  camie  to  Waterloo  and  entered 
the  office  of  J.  E.  W^illiams,  who  admitted  him  into  a  partnership  a  year  later, 
since  which  tmie  the  firm  of  Williams  &  Clark  has  enjoyed  a  growing  clientage 
here.  Their  practice  is  now  extensive  and  of  an  important  character  and  there 
are  few  prominent  cases  heard  in  the  courts  with  which  this  firm  is  not  connected. 

In  June,  191 3,  Mr.  Clark  was  joined  in  wedlock  with  Miss  Florence  Davis, 
of  W^aterloo.  a  daughter  of  F.  R.  Davis,  of  this  city,  and  they  are  well  known 
socially,  having  a  large  circle  of  warm  friends  here.  They  have  a  son,  Charles 
Edward,  born  December  21.  1914.  ^Ir.  Clark  still  retains  his  membership  in 
the  Episcopal  church  of  Waverly  and  while  there  residing  served  for  two  years 
as  deputy  treasurer  of  Bremer  county.  He  has  membership  with  the  Masons, 
the  Elks,  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Black  Hawk 
County  Bar  Association,  the  Waterloo  Club  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 
While  a  young  man  he  has  made  steady  progress  since  entering  upon  active  con- 
nection with  his  profession  and  laudable  ambition  and  determination  are  carry- 
ing him  steadily  forward  and  winning  for  him  a  creditable  record  in  the  practice 
of  law. 


JAMES  EDMUND  ARTHUR. 

An  excellent  farm  of  one  hundred  and  seventy-two  acres  situated  on  section 
7,  Spring  Creek  township,  pays  tribute  to  the  care  and  labor  bestowed  upon  it 
by  its  owner,  James  Edmund  Arthur,  who  is  now  successfully  engaged  in  gen- 
eral farming,  his  place  being  splendidly  improved.  He  was  born  in  Fox  town- 
ship, this  county,  in  July,  i860,  a  son  of  George  W.  and  Nancy  A.  (Peery) 
Arthur,  the  former  a  native  of  Tennessee  and  the  latter  of  Illinois.  The  father 
was  a  farmer  and  came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  Iowa,  in  1852.  He  entered  land 
in  Fox  township,  casting  in  his  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers  of  the  district.  Not 
a  furrow  had  been  turned  nor  an  improvement  made,  but  with  characteristic 
energy  he  began  the  development  of  the  place  with  the  result  that  he  had  trans- 
formed it  into  rich  and  productive  fields  long  before  he  sold  out  in  1884.  In 
that  year  he  removed  to  Raymond,  where  he  purchased  land,  and  to  that  farm 
devoted  his  attention  throughout  the  remainder  of  his  days.  He  passed  away 
in  April.  1910,  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years,  and  is  survived  by  his  wife,  who 
is  living  on  the  old  home  place  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-three  years. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  225 

James  E.  Arthur  spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  his  native 
township  and  remained  with  his  parents  to  the  age  of  twenty-two  years,  when 
he  started  out  in  Hfe  on  his  own  account  by  renting  land,  on  which  he  Hved  for 
a  year.  He  then  removed  to  Sioux  county  and  engaged  in  the  grocery  business 
at  Ireton  in  connection  with  his  brother.  For  four  years  he  was  active  in  the 
conduct  of  the  store  and  then  sold  out,  returning  to  Black  Hawk  county,  where 
he  again  rented  land.  He  continued  to  cultivate  farms  until  19  lo,  when,  having 
carefully  saved  his  earnings,  he  was  enabled  to  purchase  his  present  property, 
comprising  one  hundred  and  seventy-two  acres  on  section  7,  Spring  Creek 
township.  This  he  at  once  began  to  develop  and  improve  and  has  operated  the 
farm  with  excellent  success.  It  is  now  one  of  the  attractive  properties  of  the 
district,  forming  a  most  pleasing  feature  in  the  landscape  by  reason  of  its  sub- 
stantial buildings,  its  well  kept  fields  and  all  the  modern  accessories  which 
indicate  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  owner. 

In  January,  1885,  Mr.  Arthur  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ellen  Campbell, 
a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Isabelle  (Thompson)  Campbell,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Scotland,  whence  they  came  to  the  United  States  in  early  life.  The 
father  worked  at  the  mason's  trade  in  Chicago  when  that  city  was  scarcely  more 
than  a  swamp.  He  afterward  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  and  entered  land 
in  Spring  Creek  township.  This  he  at  once  began  to  cultivate  and  develop  suc- 
cessfully, carrying  on  farm  work  there  until  a  few  years  prior  to  his  death, 
when  he  retired  from  active  business  and  removed  to  Cedar  Falls,  where  he 
died  in  1906,  having  for  four  years  survived  his  wife,  who  passed  away  in  1902. 
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arthur  have  been  born  seven  children,  namely:  Vernal  J., 
Mina  I.,  Flossie  M.,  E.  Grace,  Margaret  J.,  Russell  and  Lloyd,  aged  respectively 
twenty-four,  twenty-two,  twenty-one,  twenty,  eighteen,  fifteen  and  thirteen  years. 

In  addition  to  his  other  interests  Mr.  Arthur  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers 
Creamery  at  La  Porte  City.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian 
church  and  to  its  teachings  he  is  most  loyal.  He  holds  membership  with  the 
Knights  of  the  Maccabees  and  in  politics  is  a  republican,  giving  to  the  party 
stalwart  support.  For  two  years  he  served  as  township  trustee  and  has  also 
filled  the  office  of  constable,  while  he  is  interested  in  everything  pertaining  to 
the  general  welfare  and  his  cooperation  has  been  an  active  and  forceful  factor 
in  advancing  the  public  good  along  various  Hnes.  He  deserves  much  credit  for 
what  he  has  accomplished  in  a  business  way,  for  he  started  out  in  life  empty- 
handed  and  by  determination  and  energy  has  reached  his  present  position  as  one 
of  the  men  of  affluence  in  his  native  county.  He  was  elected  justice  of  the  peace 
in  November,  1914. 


H.  W.  BROWN,  M.  D. 


A  spirit  of  enterprise,  of  progress,  the  dominant  idea  of  going  ahead,  of 
accomplishing  something  greater  than  has  been  done  hitherto  all  find  exemplifi- 
cation in  the  life  and  professional  activities  of  Dr.  H.  W.  Brown,  and  there  is 
no  physician  practicing  in  Waterloo  who  keeps  more  closely  in  touch  with  modern 
scientific  investigation  and  methods  in  medical  and  surgical  practice. 


226  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

He  is  one  of  the  city's  native  sons,  born  in  1880.  His  father,  Dr.  H.  W. 
Brown,  who  passed  away  in  February,  1913,  had  been  a  practitioner  of  medi- 
cine in  Waterloo  for  forty-one  years  and  was  accounted  not  only  one  of  the 
valued  representatives  of  the  profession  but  also  one  of  the  honored  citizens. 
The  son  attended  the  public  schools  until  he  completed  his  course  by  graduation 
from  the  high  school  and  later  he  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  Iowa 
State  University,  where  he  won  his  professional  degree  as  an  alumnus  of  the 
class  of  1906.  He  immediately  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession  with 
his  father  and  the  relation  was  maintained  until  the  latter's  death.  Dr.  Brown 
then  practiced  alone  until  June,  1914,  when  the  present  firm  of  O'Keefe,  Brown 
&  Hoffmann  was  formed.  They  have  an  extensive  practice  and  their  office  is 
supplied  with  all  modern  equipments,  an  X-ray  machine  and  all  the  latest  im- 
proved surgical  instruments  and  apparatus  to  further  their  efforts  for  the  restora- 
tion of  health.  Their  library  is  an  extensive  one  and  Dr.  Brown  has  ever 
remained  a  close  student  of  the  literature  of  the  profession.  Moreover,  he  is  a 
member  of  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical 
Society  and  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Association. 

While  his  professional  activities  are  his  chief  interest  and  no  professional 
duty  is  neglected  for  outside  interests,  he  nevertheless  is  well  known  in  other 
connections  and  heartily  supports  and  cooperates  in  all  of  the  plans  and  move- 
ments of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  is  a  member, 
for  the  upbuilding  and  benefit  of  the  city.  He  likewise  has  membership  with 
the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  is  popular  in  that  organization  and 
among  all  by  whom  he  is  known.  His  entire  life  having  been  passed  in  Waterloo, 
he  has  a  wide  acquaintance  and  goodwill  toward  and  high  regard  for  him  are 
expressed  on  all  sides. 


IDA  G.  RHOADES,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Ida  G.  Rhoades,  secretary  of  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society 
and  a  practicing  physician  and  surgeon  of  Cedar  Falls,  has,  in  keeping  with  the 
tendency  of  the  age  toward  specialization,  largely  concentrated  her  energies 
upon  diseases  of  women  and  children.  She  has  her  office  at  No.  125  West  Sixth 
street  and  she  is  enjoying  a  constantly  growing  practice.  Dr.  Rhoades  is  a 
native  of  Chicago  and  a  daughter  of  J.  M.  Grant,  a  cousin  of  Ulysses  S.  Grant. 
When  fifteen  years  of  age  she  came  to  Iowa  and  after  acquiring  a  broad  and 
liberal  education  she  determined  to  engage  in  the  practice  of  medicine  as  a  life 
work,  and  with  that  end  in  view  entered  the  medical  department  of  Drake  Uni- 
versity, from  which  she  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1909.  She  served  as 
an  interne  in  St.  Joseph's  Hospital  for  one  year  and  thus  put  her  theoretical 
knowledge  to  the  practical  test  and  gained  that  broad  practical  experience  which 
only  hospital  work  can  bring.  At  the  end  of  that  time  she  came  to  Cedar  Falls, 
where  she  has  since  followed  her  profession  as  a  general  practitioner,  although 
specializing  to  a  considerable  extent  in  the  treatment  of  diseases  of  women  and 
children.  Her  knowledge  is  broad  and  her  skill  places  her  among  the  able  mem- 
bers of  the  profession  in  this  section  of  the  state.     She  is  a  member  of  the  Black 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  227 

Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  of  which  she  is  the  present  secretary,  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Women's  Medical  Association,  of  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Society  and 
the  American  Medical  Association. 

In  1899  Miss  Ida  G.  Grant  became  the  wife  of  Charles  B.  Rhoades,  a  native 
of  IlHnois  and  a  son  of  George  T.  Rhoades.  He  is  now  a  retired  traveling  sales- 
man and  is  the  owner  of  a  fine  farm  near  Webster  City,  Iowa,  from  which  he 
derives  a  very  substantial  annual  income.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  high 
rank  and  is  now  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  Dr.  Rhoades  is  connected 
with  the  Eastern  Star  and  also  with  the  Royal  Neighbors.  She  is  a  member  of 
the  Congregational  church  and  is  interested  in  all  good  works.  She  has  one  of 
the  fine  homes  of  Cedar  Falls  and  is  very  popular  socially  as  well  as  profes- 
sionally, enjoying  in  unqualified  measure  the  high  regard  and  goodwill  of  not 
only  the  members  of  the  profession  but  of  ail  who  know  her. 


E.  T.  ALFORD,  M.  D. 


Dr.  E.  T.  Alford,  a  practicing  physician  of  Black  Hawk  county  living  at 
Waterloo,  is  one  of  the  representatives  of  the  profession  who  holds  to  high 
standards  and  has  done  excellent  work  worthy  the  gratitude  and  high  regard 
of  his  fellow  townsmen.  He  is  a  native  son  of  Waterloo,  his  birth  havmg  here 
occurred  thirty-nine  years  ago.  his  father  being  the  Hon.  Lore  Alford.  At  the 
usual  age  the  son  entered  the  public  schools,  passing  from  grade  to  grade  until 
he  was  graduated  from  the  East  Waterloo  high  school  with  the  class  of  1893. 
In  further  preparation  for  the  practical  and  responsible  duties  of  life  he  entered 
the  pharmaceutical  school  of  the  Northwestern  University  of  Illinois,  at  Chicago, 
and  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1896.  His  next  step  toward  a  professional  career 
was  matriculation  in  Rush  Medical  College  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  is  an  alumnus 

of  1901.  .        ,      „,  . 

During  the  years   1902-03  Dr.  Alford  was  house  surgeon   for  the  Chicago 
Baptist  Hospital  and  then  went  abroad   for   further  study,  attending  the  Uni- 
versity of  Vienna  in  1904-05.     He  came  under  the  instruction  of  some  of  the 
most   eminent   physicians   and   surgeons   of   the   old   world   and  attended  many 
clinics    wherein   he   gained   wide   knowledge   of    modern    scientific   methods   of 
medical  practice.    Upon  his  return  to  the  new  world,  he  settled  in  Chicago,  where 
he  opened  an  office  and  followed  his  profession  until  1908.     He  then  came_  to 
Waterloo    where  he  has  since  been  engaged  in  practice,  corifimng  his  attention 
more  and  more  largely  to  surgery  as  the  years  have  passed  on.     His  work  as  a 
surgeon  covers  almost  the  entire  state  and  his  ability  in  that  direction  ranks  him 
among  the  foremost  members  of  the  profession  in  Iowa.     He  is  now  chief  sur- 
geon for  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Cedar  Rapids  Railroad,  is  district  surgeon 
for  the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railroad,  is  surgeon  for  the  Rock  Island  &  Pacific 
Railroad  and  is  surgeon  to  the  Presbyterian  and  St.  Francis  Hospitals. 
■      Dr   Alford  was  married  in  1906  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Wilhston,  of  Manchester, 
and  they  have  become  parents   of   two   children,   Williston   and   Eleanor.     Dr. 
Alford  holds  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  is 
intensely  interested  in  the  city's  welfare  and  upbuilding.     However,  his  atten- 


228  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

tion  is  chiefly  given  to  his  profession,  which  is  constantly  making  greater  de- 
mands upon  him.  He  belongs  to  the  local  medical  society,  the  Iowa  State  Med- 
ical Society,  the  Iowa  Clinical  Surgical  Society,  the  American  Association  of 
Railway  Surgeons  and  the  American  Medical  Association.  He  is  also  a  Fellow 
of  the  American  College  of  Surgeons. 


JOHN.  H.  LUNEMANN. 

John  H.  Lunemann  has  been  officially  connected  with  the  First  National  Bank 
of  La  Porte  City  for  a  number  of  years  and  is  now  serving  as  its  vice  president. 
He  gives  the  greater  part  of  his  attention,  however,  to  his  real-estate  business, 
which  is  very  extensive  and  makes  heavy  demands  upon  his  time.  He  was  born 
in  Waterloo,  on  the  4th  of  September,  1870,  a  son  of  Herman  and  Jantje 
(Plumer)  Lunemann,  both  natives  of  Germany.  Upon  their  emigration  to 
America  they  made  their  way  to  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  where  they  located  in  1864. 
The  father  followed  his  trade  of  blacksmithing  there  for  three  years  and  then 
the  family  removed  to  Waterloo,  which  remained  their  home  for  a  similar  length 
of  time.  At  the  end  of  that  period  they  removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where  the 
parents  lived  during  the  remainder  of  their  lives.  The  father,  who  was  a  resi- 
dent of  La  Porte  City  for  about  forty  years  and  was  widely  known  and  greatly 
respected,  died  in  January,  19 10,  and  the  mother  in  November,   1898. 

John  H.  Lunemann  was  but  an  infant  when  the  family  removed  to  La  Porte 
City  and  his  boyhood  days  were  spent  there.  He  received  his  education  in  the 
city  schools,  being  graduated  from  the  high  school  in  1886,  and  for  five  years 
thereafter  he  clerked,  after  which  he  engaged  in  the  dry-goods  and  clothing 
business  for  himself.  After  ten  years  so  spent,  or  in  1901,  he  removed  to 
Dysart,  Iowa,  and  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  First  National  Bank  at 
that  place.  He  was  the  first  cashier  of  that  institution  but  did  not  serve  in  that 
capacity  long,  as,  in  1902,  he  was  elected  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
La  Porte  City  and  filled  that  position  for  six  and  a  half  years.  Since  that  time 
he  has  been  vice  president  of  the  bank  and  has  devoted  his  energies  chiefly  to 
the  conduct  of  his  large  real-estate  business.  He  handles  Florida  lands  and  is 
vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  National  Land  Company  of  Jackson- 
ville, Florida ;  secretary  and  general  manager  of  the  Florida  Homeseekers  Land 
Company  with  headquarters  at  Melbourne,  Florida ;  and  secretary  of  the  Lune- 
mann Land  Company  of  W^hite  Springs,  Florida.  He  is  also  president  of  the 
Davenport  Land  &  Improvement  Company  of  Davenport.  Iowa.  These  various 
companies  are  prospering  and  doing  a  large  business  and  his  efficiency  and 
ability  are  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  holds  a  responsible  position  in  all  of  them. 

Mr.  Lunemann  was  married  in  December,  1896,  to  Miss  Augusta  Miller,  a 
daughter  of  Rev.  M.  J.  and  Sobina  (Andre)  Miller,  natives  of  Pennsylvania. 
Her  father  was  a  German  Evangelical  minister  and  was  sent  to  Kansas  as  a 
missionary  in  the  pioneer  days  of  that  state  before  the  Civil  war.  He  preached 
many  years  at  diff'erent  places  and  was  for  three  years  stationed  at  La  Porte 
City.  In  1912  he  passed  to  his  reward,  but  his  widow  survives  and  makes  her 
home  here.     To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lunemann  have  been  born  three  children  :     [ohn 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  229 

Miller,  thirteen  years  of  age  who  is  attending  school ;  Mark  Henry,  a  child  of 
eight  who  is  also  attending  school;  and  Roger  Alan,  who  is  two  years  old. 

Mr.  Lunemann  is  a  loyal  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and 
fraternally  is  quite  well  known,  belonging  to  the  Masonic  lodge,  the  Modern 
Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees.  His  political  alle- 
giance is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  has  served  as  mayor  of  the  city 
for  one  term.  He  owns  what  is  probably  the  finest  home  in  the  city  and  his 
real-estate  business  returns  him  annually  a  handsome  profit.  His  fellow  citizens 
not  only  respect  his  ability  as  displayed  in  the  commercial  world,  but  also  esteem 
him  for  his  integrity  and  uprightness  of  character. 


JOHN  FRANCIS  SIMPSON. 

For  a  quarter  of  a  century  John  Francis  Simpson  has  been  a  resident  of 
Waterloo,  where  he  is  now  well  known  as  the  president  of  the  Crystal  Ice  & 
Fuel  Company.  He  was  born  in  Davenport  in  1866,  but  was  reared  in  Paoli, 
Indiana.  On  coming  to  Waterloo  about  twenty-five  years  ago — then  a  young 
man  in  the  early  twenties — he  eagerly  embraced  every  opportunity  that  would 
enable  him  to  earn  an  honest  living  and  finally  entered  the  employ  of  J.  T. 
Burkett,  a  millwright,  with  whom  he  was  connected  during  the  construction  of 
the  mill  of  the  Cedar  A^alley  Manufacturing  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Burkett 
was  an  officer.  He  afterward  spent  seven  years  with  the  Deering  Harvester 
Company  and  still  later  was  for  a  year  in  the  employ  of  the  Iowa  Dairy  Separator 
Company.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  accepted  the  management  of  the  Waterloo 
Ice  &  Fuel  Company.  This  was  in  February.  1902.  Three  years  later,  or  in 
February,  1905,  the  business  was  reorganized  under  the  name  of  the  Crystal 
Ice  &  Fuel  Company  and  Mr.  Simpson  became  manager  of  the  new  concern, 
with  C.  P.  Fedderson  as  the  president,  L.  D.  Miller  as  secretary  and  treasurer, 
and  N.  Federspeil  as  vice  president.  The  business  was  thus  continued  until  the 
following  year,  when  Mr.  Simpson  and  L.  D.  Miller  bought  the  interest  of  the 
other  two  stockholders,  since  which  time  Mr.  Simpson  has  been  the  president 
of  the  company,  with  Mr.  Miller  as  the  secretary  and  treasurer. 

In  1904  Mr.  Simpson,  in  connection  with  H.  E.  Teachout,  of  Des  Moines, 
and  C.  M.  Mohler,  organized  the  Iowa  Ice  Dealers'  Association,  of  which  he 
has  since  been  the  secretary.  He  is  also  fourth  vice,  president  and  director  of 
the  Natural  Ice  Association  of  America.  In  business  affairs  he  seems  to  see 
from  the  circumference  to  the  very  center  of  things  and  recognizes  to  the  utmost 
extent  the  possibilities  of  a  situation.  He  is  energetic,  is  equally  determined, 
and  in  the  conduct  of  his  interests  brooks  no  obstacles  that  can  be  overcome 
by  persistent,  earnest  and  honorable  efifort. 

Mr.  Simpson  has  been  married  twice.  He  first  wedded  Miss  Agnes  Thomp- 
son, who  at  her  death  left  three  children :  Charles  Francis,  now  a  student  in 
the  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology  at  Boston;  and  Arthur  R.  and  Paul 
A.,  who  are  students  in  the  East  Side  high  school  of  Waterloo.  For  his  second 
wife  Mr.  Simpson  chose  Miss  Alice  M.  Shutts.  They  are  well  known  in  Water- 
loo, where  they  have  many  friends. 


230  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Mr.  Simpson  was  reared  a  strict  Presbyterian.  While  not  a  member  of  the 
church  at  the  present  time  his  life  has  ever  been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable 
principles  and  he  is  an  exemplary  representative  of  the  Masonic  fraternity, 
which  has  as  its  basic  principle  a  recognition  of  the  brotherhood  of  mankind. 
He  has  attained  very  high  rank  in  Masonry  and  has  been  honored  with  many 
official  positions.  He  has  served  as  high  priest  of  Tabernacle  Chapter,  No.  52, 
R.  A.  M.;  as  thrice  illustrious  master  of  Crescent  Council,  No.  16,  R.  &  S.  M. ; 
and  as  warden  of  Ascalon  Commandery,  No.  25,  K.  T.  He  has  been  secretary 
of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  K.  &  A.  M.,  for  three  years  and  has  filled  most 
of  the  chairs  in  that  organization.  He  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of 
the  Scottish  Rite  and  he  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Eastern  Star.  He  also  has 
membership  with  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  with  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  belongs  to  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  to  the  Waterloo  Traveling  Men's 
Association.  His  entire  life  has  been  marked  by  a  steady  advance.  His  in- 
dustry and  enterprise  find  tangible  evidence  in  his  success.  He  may  well  take 
pride  in  his  present  achievements,  for  he  has  been  most  true  and  loyal  to  the 
beneficent  teachings  of  the  craft  and  it  has  ever  been  his  rule  to  balance  accounts 
between  acts  and  motives. 


CLARENCE  E.  BENEDICT. 

Clarence  E.  Benedict,  conducting  a  growing  and  profitable  business  in  the 
vulcanizing  of  automobile  tires  and  all  rubber  goods,  was  born  near  Washburn, 
this  county,  on  the  ist  of  June,  1887,  a  son  of  Elial  and  EHzabeth  (Rowbottom) 
Benedict,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Wisconsin,  born  near  Kenosha.  The 
father  made  farming  his  life  work,  following  that  pursuit  in  Wisconsin  until 
1884,  when  he  came  to  Iowa,  settling  on  a  farm  south  of  Washburn,  where  he 
resided  for  about  eighteen  or  twenty  years.  He  then  removed  to  a  farm  west 
of  Waterloo  and  thereon  remained  until  191 1,  when  he  went  to  Saskatchewan, 
Canada,  where  he  is  now  carrying  on  general  agricultural  pursuits,  having  de- 
voted his  entire  life  to  that  vocation.  In  his  family  were  two  children,  the 
elder  being  George,  now  residing  south  of  Waterloo,  where  he  carries  on  general 
farming. 

The  younger  is  Clarence  E.  Benedict,  who  after  attending  the  country 
schools,  in  which  he  mastered  the  elementary  branches  of  learning,  became  a 
student  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College.  Through  the  period  of  his  early 
youth  he  assisted  his  father  in  the  work  of  the  fields  and  at  the  age  of  seventeen 
years  began  working  for  others,  being  thus  employed  up  to  the  time  of  his  mar- 
riage, when  he  began  farming  on  his  own  account  in  Canada.  He  remained  for 
three  years  in  that  country  and  then  returned  to  Black  Hawk  county,  taking  up 
his  abode  in  Waterloo.  For  about  a  year  he  was  employed  at  the  vulcanizing 
business  and  then  embarked  in  the  same  business  on  his  own  account,  since 
which  time  he  has  secured  a  large  patronage  from  the  people  of  Waterloo  and 
the  surrounding  territory.  His  trade  is  growing  week  by  week  and  has  already 
assumed  gratifying  and  profitable  proportions. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  231 

On  the  i6th  of  February,  191 1,  Mr.  Benedict  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Ethel  Fike,  who  was  born  in  Tama  county,  Iowa,  her  parents  being  Emanuel 
and  Ella  (Hill)  Fike.  They  now  reside  in  Waterloo,  the  father  having  retired 
from  active  business.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benedict  have  one  child,  Gerald,  born  on 
May  6,  1914.  Their  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  the 
services  of  which  they  attend.  Mr.  Benedict  is  independent  in  politics,  nor  has 
he  sought  to  figure  prominently  in  any  public  connection,  preferring  to  concen- 
trate his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs.  He  and  his  family  now  reside  at 
No.  219^4  West  Sixth  street. 


•    AMOS  \^AN  V.ALKENBURG. 

For  over  three  decades  Amos  Van  Valkenburg  has  been  cashier  of  the  Union 
State  Bank  of  La  Porte  City  and  he  is  conceded  to  be  one  of  the  financial  leaders 
of  the  place.  He  was  born  in  Sharon,  Schoharie  county.  New  York,  on  the  3d 
of  August,  1848,  a  son  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Van  Valkenburg.  His  ancestry 
has  been  traced  back  for  many  generations  to  the  town  of  Valkenburg,  which  is 
now  within  the  borders  of  Holland,  although  the  German  language  is  spoken 
there.  The  first  of  the  Van  Valkenburg  family  to  emigrate  to  America  were 
Lambert  and  Annetie  Van  Valkenburg,  who  settled  in  Manhattan  prior  to  1643 
and  the  records  show  that  in  that  year  he  was  the  owner  of  "forty  morgans"  of 
land  in  what  later  became  the  great  city  of  New  York.  Later  the  family  settled 
in  the  Schoharie  valley,  New  York.  The  great-grandfather  of  our  subject, 
John  J.  Van  Valkenburg,  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  the  Revolution  from 
the  fall  of  1775  until  the  close  of  the  struggle.  The  maternal  ancestors  of  Mr. 
Van  Valkenburg,  the  Browns,  settled  in  the  Schoharie  valley,  New  York,  about 
the  same  time  as  did  the  Van  Valkenburgs,  and  his  great-grandfather,  John  M. 
Brown,  Avas  likewise  a  soldier  in  the  war  for  independence.  He  was  further 
distinguished  as  the  second  judge  of  Schoharie  county  and  was  an  honored 
member  of  the  judiciary  of  New  York. 

Amos  Van  Valkenburg  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Sharon,  New 
York,  and  in  the  high  school  of  Brookfield,  Missouri.  He  began  teaching  when 
a  young  man  and  followed  that  profession  until  after  his  arrival  in  La  Porte 
City,  Iowa,  in  the  spring  of  1878.  The  following  summer  he  entered  the  City 
Exchange  Bank  as  bookkeeper  and  continued  in  that  capacity  for  five  years,  or 
until  the  suspension  of  the  bank  in  May,  1884.  The  following  month  the  Union 
State  Bank  was  organized  and  he  was  elected  assistant  cashier  and  after  nine 
months  was  promoted  to  cashier.  Throughout  the  many  years  intervening  he 
has  held  a  position  of  responsibihty  and  has  had  practically  the  entire  manage- 
ment of  the  institution.  Such  being  the  case  its  success  must  be  largely  accredited 
to  his  superior  business  ability  and  judicious  direction  of  afifairs.  He  has  been 
cashier  of  the  bank  for  three  decades  and  during  that  time  less  than  five  hundred 
dollars  has  been  lost  through  the  loan  department,  which  is  a  record  very  seldom 
made  by  a  banking  house.  The  funds  of  the  institution  are  so  handled  that  not  only 
is  their  safety  secured  but  the  bank  is  also  enabled  to  pay  a  good  dividend.     Mr. 


232  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Van   Valkenburg  is  accounted  one  of  the  most  successful  bankers  in  this  part 
of  the  country  and  his  advice  upon  financial  matters  is  often  sought. 

Mr.  Van  Valkenburg  was  married  in  1876  to  Miss  Georgie  Ricker,  of 
Empire,  Minnesota,  who  had  been  one  of  his  pupils  while  he  was  a  teacher,  and 
to  them  has  been  born  a  daughter,  Irene.  Mr.  Van  Valkenburg  has  been  called 
upon  to  rill  various  public  positions  and  in  each  instance  has  rendered  efficient 
service.  For  five  terms  he  was  city  recorder  and  served  for  many  years  on  the 
school  board,  being  for  fifteen  years  president  of  that  body,  and  during  that 
time  many  forward  steps  were  taken  in  the  management  of  the  public  schools. 
Fraternally  he  belongs  to  the  Masonic  order  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Commercial  Club  of  La  Porte  City  and  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of 
Trade  of  Waterloo.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and 
he  was  the  chairman  of  the  last  republican  county  convention  held  under  the  old 
caucus  plan.  He  and  his  family  are  adherents  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and 
he  contributes  of  his  means  to  the  furtherance  of  its  work.  He  has  taken  quite 
a  prominent  part  in  the  establishment  of  various  business  enterprises,  being  one 
of  the  organizers  of  the  La  Porte  City  Building  &  Loan  Association,  the  Union 
State  Bank,  the  La  Porte  Improvement  Company,  the  Electric  Light  &  Water 
Company,  the  Iowa  Canning  Company  and  the  Permanent  Sewer  Company. 
His  fine  home  at  No.  626  Commercial  street  is  but  one  evidence  of  his  material 
prosperity  and  he  is  justly  considered  one  of  the  representative  men  of  the  com- 
munity. His  financial  success  is  but  one  phase  of  his  achievement  as  he  has 
accomplished  much  along  lines  that  make  for  the  moral  and  intellectual  advance- 
ment of  the  city. 


WILLIAM  ALBERT  HEY. 

William  Albert  Hey  is  a  member  of  the  Miller-Hey  Construction  Company, 
of  Waterloo,  which  is  widely  known  throughout  this  section  of  the  country  for 
work  in  constructing  concrete  bridges.  He  was  born  near  Topeka,  in  Osage 
county,  Kansas,  on  the  ist  of  August,  1870,  a  son  of  Jacob  and  Jennie  (Andrews) 
Hey,  natives  of  New  York  and  Ohio  respectively.  The  father  is  a  retired  farmer 
living  upon  the  farm  in  Kansas  which  he  entered  as  a  homestead  forty-five  years 
ago.  His  first  wife  passed  away  in  1885.  To  their  union  were  born  five  chil- 
dren:  Delia,  who  died  when  fifteen  years  of  age;  William  Albert,  of  this  re- 
view; Cora,  now  Mrs.  Elmer  Armor,  of  San  Diego,  California;  Denton,  who 
resides  in  Tulsa,  Oklahoma;  and  Anna,  the  wife  of  Stephen  Halstead,  who  lives 
in  Overbrook,  Kansas.  The  father  was  again  married.  Miss  Rose  Frazier  be- 
coming his  wife,  and  they  had  two  children:  Florence,  who  died  when  a  child 
of  three  years;  and  Roscoe,  of  Manhattan,  Kansas. 

William  A.  Pley  remained  in  Kansas  until  he  was  nineteen  years  of  age  and 
attended  the  public  schools  in  the  acquirement  of  his  education.  Upon  leaving 
the  Sunflower  state  he  went  to  Colorado  and  engaged  in  building  steel  bridges, 
beginning  at  the  bottom  of  that  business  and  working  up  as  his  knowledge  in- 
creased. After  a  short  time  he  was  made  assistant  foreman  and  still  later  his 
ability  was  recognized  and  he   was  promoted  to  the  position  of   foreman.      In 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  233 

1893  he  left  the  employ  of  the  company  with  which  he  had  been  connected  for 
a  number  of  years  and  became  associated  with  the  Chicago  Bridge  &  Iron  Com- 
pany of  Chicago,  with  which  he  remained  two  and  one-half  years.  He  then 
went  with  the  Indiana  Bridge  Company  and  continued  in  their  employ  for  about 
a  year  and  a  half,  sub-contracting  for  them  a  part  of  this  time.  He  then  worked 
for  three  years  as  a  miner  and  mining  contractor  in  Cripple  Creek,  Colorado, 
and  Old  Mexico  and  proved  very  successful  in  these  connections.  Following 
this  he  was  with  a  number  of  bridge  companies  in  various  capacities,  but  in 
time  became  connected  Avith  the  Marsh  Bridge  Company  of  Des  Moines,  and 
was  made  superintendent  of  construction,  which  place  he  held  until  June  i, 
1908,  when  he  left  their  employ.  He  then  built  a  home  in  Highland  Park,  Des 
Moines,  and  engaged  in  general  contracting  in  that  city.  In  April  of  the  next 
year,  he  became  a  member  of  the  Advance  Construction  Company,  with  head- 
quarters at  Waukesha,  Wisconsin,  and  was  superintendent  of  construction  in 
the  bridge  building  department.  While  with  that  company  he  built  some  of  the 
largest  and  finest  concrete  bridges  in  this  section  of  the  country,  among  them 
being  that  across  the  Cedar  river  at  Charles  City,  Iowa,  and  one  at  Ypsilanti, 
Michigan,  across  the  Huron  river. 

In  191 1  Mr.  Hey  formed  a  partnership  with  George  W.  Miller  and  they 
purchased  the  bridge  department  of  the  Advance  Construction  Company,  located 
in  Waterloo,  and  continued  its  operation  under  the  firm  name  of  Miller-Hey 
Construction  Company.  They  confine  their  attention  exclusively  to  the  building 
of  concrete  bridges,  combining  strength  and  power  of  resistance  with  beauty  of 
design,  and  the  business  of  the  firm  is  steadily  increasing  as  the  merit  of  their 
work  becomes  more  widely  known. 

Mr.  Hey  was  married  on  the  2d  of  October.  1901,  at  Victoria,  Colorado,  to 
Miss  Hattie  Miller,  a  native  of  Des  Moines  and  a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Ada 
(Likes)  Miller.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hey  have  been  born  four  children:  Jesse 
Parks,  eleven  years  old ;  Wilma  Jeannette,  seven  years  of  age ;  William  Edwin, 
five  years  old ;  and  Ruth  Louise,  a  child  of  two  years. 

Mr.  Hey  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and  has  always 
taken  a  praiseworthy  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  community  in  which  he  re- 
sides. The  Miller-Hey  Construction  Company  is  one  of  the  leading  industrial 
enterprises  of  Waterloo  and  adds  largely  to  the  business  activity  and  growth  of 
the  city.  Much  of  the  success  of  the  company  is  due  to  the  technical  knowledge 
and  the  administrative  ability  of  Mr.  Hey  and  he  is  ranked  among  the  prominent 
men  of  the  city. 


GEORGE  W.  MILLER. 


George  W.  Miller  is  the  secretary-treasurer  of  the  Miller-Hey  Construction 
Company,  builders  of  concrete  bridges,  in  which  connection  the  company  enjoys 
a  most  enviable  reputation  that  has  led  to  contracts  being  awarded  them  in  Iowa 
and  other  states.  Mr.  Miller  was  born  in  Barnes  City,  Mahaska  county,  Iowa, 
April  16,  1881,  a  son  of  John  B.  and  Martha  A.  (Darland)  Miller,  the  former 
a  native  of  Ohio  and  the  latter  of   Indiana.     Mrs.   Miller  was  a  daughter  of 


234  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

John  and  Margaret  (Lowe)  Darland,  who  are  residents  at  this  time  of  the  town 
in  which  George  W.  Miller  was  born.  John  B.  Miller  was  a  son  of  Samuel 
and  Maria  (Braddock)  Miller,  who  arrived  in  Iowa  in  1855,  in  which  year  they 
removed  from  Hancock  county,  Ohio,  to  Keokuk  county,  this  state.  During 
his  early  manhood  John  B.  Miller  engaged  in  teaching  school  and  later  followed 
merchandising  in  Iowa.  In  1853  Martha  A.  Darland  arrived  in  Poweshiek 
county,  Iowa,  with  her  parents,  who,  Hke  the  parents  of  John  B.  Miller,  were 
among  the  early  settlers,  taking  an  active  part  in  the  pioneer  development.  For 
many  years  John  B.  Miller  successfully  carried  on  business  and  in  1896  retired, 
spending  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment  of  a  well  earned  rest  until  death 
called  him  on  the  24th  of  August,  1907.  His  wife  passed  away  August  24, 
1908,  just  a  year  after  his  demise.  They  were  the  parents  of  two  children : 
Lilly  Mae,  the  wife  of  A.  E.  Priem,  a  business  man  of  Seattle,  Washington; 
and  George  W. 

The  latter  attended  school  in  Alontezuma,  Iowa,  where  his  father  was  en- 
gaged in  business.  In  the  pursuit  of  his  education  he  passed  through  consecu- 
tive grades  until  graduated  from  the  Montezuma  high  school  with  the  class  of 
1898.  He  then  entered  Iowa  State  College  at  Ames  in  1899  and  there  pursued 
a  course  in  civil  engineering,  which  he  completed  in  1903,  winning  the  degree  of 
B.  C.  E.  After  his  graduation  he  was  employed  in  the  city  engineer's  office  at 
Des  Moines  until  December  of  that  year,  when  he  became  connected  with  the 
Marsh  Bridge  Company  of  Des  Moines  as  an  engineer,  remaining  with  that 
firm  until  1906.  He  then  returned  to  the  ofifice  of  the  city  engineer,  where  he 
remained  for  one  year  as  assistant  city  engineer  of  Des  Moines,  after  which  he 
again  spent  one  year  in  the  employ  of  the  Marsh  Bridge  Company.  He  next 
went  to  Norwood,  Colorado,  in  April,  1908,  as  chief  engineer  for  the  Empire 
Irrigation  Company.  On  the  1st  of  September  of  the  same  year,  however,  he 
returned  to  the  middle  west,  going  to  Wisconsin,  where  he  became  bridge  engi- 
neer for  the  Advance  Construction  Company.  In  the  spring  of  1909  he  became 
a  stockholder  therein  and  came  to  Waterloo  as  Iowa  representative  of  the  com- 
pany. On  the  1st  of  January,  191 1,  Mr.  Miller  and  W.  A.  Hey  took  over  the 
bridge  department  of  the  Advance  Construction  Company  and  they  then  formed 
a  partnership  under  the  name  of  the  Miller-FIey  Construction  Company,  engi- 
neers and  constructors  of  concrete  bridges.  They  have  secured  various  im- 
portant contracts  resulting  in  building  numerous  bridges  throughout  Iowa  and 
other  states.  Mr.  Miller  thoroughly  understands  the  scientific  principles  which 
underlie  the  business  as  well  as  the  practical  phases  of  the  work  and  is  thus  well 
qualified  to  execute  important  contracts.  He  also  is  interested  in  a  fruit  ranch 
in  Idaho  and  is  the  owner  of  valuable  residence  and  business  property  in 
Waterloo. 

On  the  6th  of  April,  1904,  Mr.  Miller  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Cam- 
mie  L.  Waugh,  a  native  of  Albia,  Iowa,  and  a  daughter  of  John  E.  and  Martha 
(Arnold)  Waugh,  who  were  early  settlers  of  this  state.  Mrs.  Miller's  grand- 
father Waugh  was  killed  at  Nashville,  December  3,  1864,  while  serving  in  the 
Union  army.  Her  mother  died  November  9,  1906,  and  her  father  now  resides 
near  Nampa,  Idaho.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Miller  have  been  born  three  children : 
Kenneth  Arnold,  eight  years  of  age;  Howard  Albert,  who  is  five  years  of  age; 
and  John  Robert,  who  is  but  a  year  old. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  235 

Mr.  Miller  holds  membership  in  both  the  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons 
and  the  Royal  Arch  Masons  and  he  belongs  also  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  but  he  does  not  seek  nor  de- 
sire office,  preferring  to  give  his  undivided  attention  to  his  business  afifairs,  in 
which  he  is  meeting  with  substantial  success  owing  to  his  close  application,  his 
indefatigable  efforts  and  his  honorable  methods. 


E.  A.  SNYDER. 


E.  A.  Snyder,  of  Cedar  Falls,  now  in  his  seventy-seventh  year,  as  student, 
teacher,  soldier,  surveyor,  as  editor  for  thirty-six  years  and  postmaster  for  ten 
years,  filled  over  a  half  century  with  useful  activity.  A  student  at  Wyoming 
Seminary,  Kingston  and  Dickinson  Seminary  of  Williamsport,  Pennsylvania, 
and  in  1858  at  Dixon  College  in  Dixon,  Illinois,  he  was  well  equipped  for  teach- 
ing. His  professional  service  was  broken  by  his  enlistment  at  the  age  of  twenty- 
three  in  the  Dement  Phalanx,  September  i,  1861.  He  was  appointed  adjutant 
of  the  post.  The  demand  for  all  available  soldiers  to  assist  in  taking  Fort 
Donelson  led  to  the  retirement  of  Colonel  Dement,  who  was  a  Black  Hawk  war 
colonel,  and  left  Adjutant  Snyder  to  discharge  the  duties  of  that  position  for  an 
inexperienced  relative  of  his  new  colonel  but  on  a  private's  pay.  He  carried  a 
gun  at  Fort  Donelson  and  both  days  on  Shiloh's  bloody  field,  having  a  number 
of  close  calls  from  shells  and  bullets.  He  participated  in  the  siege  of  Corinth 
and  later  was  promoted  to  second  lieutenant,  "for  meritorious  services,''  as  his 
commission  states.  After  the  battle  of  Hatchie  river,  where  his  colonel,  John 
A.  Davis,  was  mortally  wounded  directly  in  the  rear  of  Lieutenant  Snyder,  the 
latter  was  detailed  as  an  officer  in  the  United  States  Signal  Corps  and  served 
with  the  staff  of  General  Grant  and  later  with  General  Sherman  during  the 
siege  of  Vicksburg,  while  still  later  he  was  with  General  Logan. 

Some  months  after  Mr.  Snyder  returned  from  the  south  he  came  to  Cedar 
Falls  and  in  1870  was  elected  county  surveyor  of  Black  Hawk  county,  in  which 
office  he  served  for  live  years. 

In  1868  he  bought  a  half  interest  in  the  Cedar  Falls  Gazette  and  became  asso- 
ciated with  his  brother,  C.  W.  Snyder,  whose  interest  he  purchased  in  1879, 
continuing  as  editor  until  February  i,  1904.  The  Gazette  was  held  in  high 
esteem  and  its  political,  moral  and  religious  principles  were  not  only  of  the 
highest  type  but  never  was  there  thrown  over  them  a  shadow  of  distrust  or 
uncertainty.  Some  of  the  men  now  engaged  in  the  activities  and  affairs  of  that 
grownng  city  continue  to  tell  him  of  the  interest  with  which  they  devoured  the 
definite,  clear  cut  editorials  and  paragraphs  they  read  when  boys  in  their  only 
newspaper,  the  Gazette.  He  engaged  earnestly  with  pen  and  law  to  promote 
the  interests  of  temperance  and  rid  Cedar  Falls  of  saloons  after  the  passage 
of  the  Iowa  prohibitory  law  and  he  has  the  unusual  record  of  having  instituted 
sixty- four  prosecutions.  The  saloon  men  were  driven  out  and  never  returned, 
but  Mr.  Snyder  remembers  these  as  his  most  trying  years,  notwithstanding 
his  army  service.  He  very  acceptably  filled  the  office  of  postmaster  of  Cedar 
Falls  from  May  i,  1899,  until  May  i,  1909,  exactly  ten  years. 


236  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

From  his  boyhood  Air.  Snyder  has  been  an  active  member  of  the  Methodist 
Society  and  in  1888  was  a  delegate  to  the  general  conference  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church  held  for  one  month  in  New  York  city.  Mr.  Snyder  has  always 
taken  an  interest  in  educational  affairs,  has  served  on  the  school  board  and  has 
contributed  liberally  to  the  educational,  benevolent  and  missionary  interests 
of  church  and  school.  He  very  much  desired  to  see  a  hospital  erected,  recog- 
nizing a  long- felt  want  in  this  connection,  and  in  1908,  by  written  agreement, 
he  promised  to  make  a  donation  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  valuable 
land  in  Canada,  provided  an  equal  sum  was  given  by  citizens  for  the  building 
of  the  hospital.  Delay  in  financing  the  undertaking  continued  until  the  death 
of  Joseph  Sartori,  when  his  son,  J.  F.  Sartori,  of  Los  Angeles,  California,  made 
a  gift  of  thirty  thousand  dollars  to  build  a  hospital  as  a  memorial  to  his  parents. 
As  one  of  the  several  trustees,  Mr.  Snyder  spent  much  time  during  the  summer 
and  fall  of  1914  looking  after  details  of  construction  and  made  contributions 
toward  grounds  and  equipment. 

On  the  24th  of  September,  1867,  Mr.  Snyder  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Mary  A.  Cameron,  of  Cedar  Falls.  Two  daughters  were  born  to  them.  The 
elder,  a  dear  daughter  upon  whom  his  heart  was  set  and  to  whose  memory  he 
desired  to  erect  a  hospital,  died  in  girlhood.  The  younger,  with  her  family, 
lives  in  Long  Beach,  California,  where  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Snyder  are  now  spending 
their  fifth  winter. 


EDWARD  H.  HEADFORD. 

Ability  and  worth  have  constituted  the  foundation  upon  which  Edward  H. 
Headford  has  builded  his  success.  He  is  now  president  of  the  Headford  Brothers 
&  Hitchins  Foundry  Company  and  as  such  is  in  control  of  a  constantly  develop- 
ing business,  which  was  established  in  Waterloo  in  1903.  A  native  of  Dubuque, 
Iowa,  he  was  born  September  4,  1862,  a  son  of  William  and  Elizabeth  (Robin- 
son) Headford,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England.  They  came  to  America, 
however,  in  childhood  days  with  their  respective  parents,  who  settled  with  their 
families  in  Iowa,  the  marriage  of  the  young  couple  being  celebrated  in  Dubuque, 
where  the  families  took  up  their  abode  about  1854.  W'illiam  Headford  was  a 
foundryman  and  was  foreman  of  a  large  plant  in  Dubuque  for  many  years, 
being  thus  actively  identified  with  the  industrial  interests  of  that  city.  He  died 
there  January  9,  1905,  and  is  survived  by  his  widow,  who  makes  her  home  in 
Dubuque. 

Edward  H.  Headford  spent  his  youthful  days  in  his  father's  home  and 
worked  his  way  upward  through  consecutive  grades  in  the  public  schools  until 
he  had  become  a  high-school  pupil.  Afterward  he  studied  in  Bayless  Commercial 
College  of  Dubuque  and  in  1878,  when  sixteen  years  of  age,  he  entered  upon 
an  apprenticeship  to  the  molder's  trade.  He  worked  in  the  Novelty  Iron  Works 
of  Dubuque  until  1887,  when  he  was  offered  and  accepted  the  foremanship  of 
the  Iowa  Iron  Works,  at  that  time  the  largest  establishment  of  the  kind  on  the 
upper  Mississippi  river.  He  continued  to  fill  this  position,  which  was  one  of 
responsibility  and  importance,  for  two  years  but,  ambitious  to  engage  in  business 


EDWARD  H.  HEADFORD 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  239 

on  his  own  account,  he  carefully  saved  his  earnings  and  at  length  joined  his 
brother,  W.  T.  Headford,  in  establishing  a  foundry  of  their  own  at  Dubuque 
under  the  firm  style  of  Headford  Brothers.  In  1892  they  were  joined  by  F.  O. 
Hitchins,  since  which  time  the  business  has  been  conducted  under  the  firm  name 
of  the  Headford  Brothers  &  Hitchins  Foundry  Company.  They  remained  in 
Dubuque  until  1903,  when  the  plant  was  removed  to  Waterloo  and  since  that 
time  their  establishment  has  been  classed  by  reason  of  the  volume  of  their  trade 
and  the  importance  of  their  business  as  one  of  the  leading  industrial  enterprises 
of  the  city. 

In  1886  Mr.  Headford  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lotta  B.  Way,  of 
Warren,  Illinois.  He  is  a  valued  member  of  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.,  and 
he  holds  membership  also  in  the  Royal  Arcanum.  He  and  his  wife  attend 
the  Congregational  church,  of  which  Mrs.  Headford  is  a  member.  His  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  for  one  term  he  served  as  alder- 
man at  large.  He  keeps  well  inform'ed  upon  the  questions  and  issues  of  the 
day  and  is  ever  ready  to  support  his  position  by  intelligent  argument.  In  com- 
munity affairs  he  is  known  as  a  supporter  of  measures  and  movements  for  the 
public  good  and  he  holds  membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  in 
the  Town  Criers  Club  of  Waterloo,  organizations  for  the  benefit  of  the  city 
and  the  expansion  of  its  business  relations.  His  success  is  the  merited  reward 
of  his  industry  and  determination.  Gradually  he  has  worked  his  way  upward 
and  may  truly  be  counted  among  the  self-made  men  of  Waterloo. 


JOHN  ANDREWS. 


John  Andrews  is  president  of  the  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company  and  secretary 
of  the  Shoemaker-Van  Pelt-Mayne  Company  of  Waterloo,  of  which  city  he 
has  been  a  resident  for  the  past  seven  years.  He  is  a  native  of  Wisconsin  but 
during  his  infancy  was  brought  to  Osage,  Iowa.  His  mother  died  during  his 
early  boyhood  and  he  was  taken  to  the  west,  living  in  South  Dakota  for  fifteen 
years.  In  early  life  he  learned  the  printer's  trade  and  has  since  been  connected 
with  sorne  phase  of  the  business.  He  was  engaged  in  publishing  in  South  Dakota 
for  twelve  years  and  also  published  a  newspaper  in  Iowa  at  Osage  and  at  Rice- 
ville  for  six  years.  In  September,  1908,  he  arrived  in  Waterloo  and  became 
interested  in  the  Fred  L.  Kimball  Company.  Mr.  Andrews  has  for  several 
years  been  president  of  the  company,  which  publishes  Kimball's  Dairy  Farmer, 
the  Creamery  Journal,  the  Milk  Trade  Journal  and  the  Egg  Reporter.  In  this 
connection  he  has  done  splendid  work.  These  papers  are  the  connecting  link 
between  a  half  million  readers  and  all  manufacturing  and  trade  interests  along 
those  lines.  They  are  of  great  value  to  the  dairy  farmer  and  breeder,  the 
creameryman,  the  milk  dealer  and  to  the  dealer  in  poultry  and  eggs.  Mr. 
Andrews  is  well  qualified  by  previous  experience  in  the  field  of  publishing  for 
his  present  work  and  in  this  connection  has  become  widely  known  throughout 
the  country. 

About  twenty-five  years  ago  Mr.  Andrews  was  united  in  mariage  to  Miss 
Minnie  Brumley  and  they  have  become  parents  of  five  children:     Dale  E.,  who 


Vol.    11—13 


240  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

took  a  three  years'  special  course  at  Ames  and  is  now  doing  special  work  along 
agricultural  journal  lines;  Merrill,  who  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years;  Maude, 
a  student  in  the  State  Teachers  College  at  Cedar  Falls;  Robert  and  Theodore, 
at  home. 

Mr.  Andrews  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views.  He  belongs  to  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  also  has  membership  in  the  Town 
Criers  Club.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  First  Baptist  church.  His  has 
been  an  active,  useful  and  well  spent  life  and  he  now  occupies  a  creditable 
position  among  the  business  men  of  Waterloo.  His  record  proves  what  can  be 
accomplished  when  energy  and  enterprise  mark  out  the  path,  and  as  the  years 
have  gone  on  his  labors  have  become  of  more  and  more  worth  to  the  world. 


HORATIO  B.  LIZER. 


Horatio  B.  Lizer,  the  owner  and  publisher  of  the  Progress-Review,  an 
up-to-date  and  interesting  weekly  newspaper  published  at  La  Porte  City,  was 
born  in  Buchanan  county,  Iowa,  on  the  19th  of  February,  1864,  a  son  of  John 
H.  and  Emma  (Allen)  Lizer,  natives  of  Ohio  and  New  York  respectively. 
The  father  accompanied  his  parents  to  Buchanan  county,  Iowa,  when  but  thir- 
teen years  of  age,  in  1852.  As  soon  as  old  enough  he  began  farming  for  him- 
self and  in  time  purchased  the  homestead  in  Jefiferson  township.  He  operated 
that  property  until  1894  and  then  retired  from  active  life,  taking  up  his  residence 
at  La  Porte,  where  he  remained  for  four  or  five  years,  when  he  removed  to 
Mnton,  Benton  county.  He  is  seventy-three  years  of  age  and  has  survived  his 
wife  since  July,  1896. 

Horatio  B.  Lizer  was  reared  in  Buchanan  county,  and  his  early  education 
was  gained  in  the  common  schools  of  his  home  neighborhood.  He  later  attended 
the  Iowa  State  Teachers  College  at  Cedar  Falls,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  class  of  1891.  He  had  taught  school  previous  to  taking  his  normal 
course  and  after  completing  it  he  resumed  that  work.  He  taught  at  Winthrop, 
Quasqueton  and  Hubbard,  being  principal  of  the  schools  in  the  latter  place. 
In  the  fall  of  1892  he  came  to  La  Porte  City  and  for  nine  years  held  the  posi- 
tion of  superintendent  of  the  local  schools.  In  1901  he  purchased  the  Progress- 
Review,  a  weekly  newspaper,  which  he  has  since  conducted.  It  has  a  circula- 
tion of  twelve  hundred  copies  and  its  advertising  columns  bring  in  a  substan- 
tial addition  to  its  revenue.  Mr.  Lizer  also  does  a  large  job-printing  business 
and  is  well  equipped  to  fill  orders  promptly.  The  weekly  press  of  the  state 
exercises  a  wide  influence  and  the  Progress-Review  of  La  Porte  City  is  a 
potent  factor  in  determining  public  opinion  in  the  territory  of  which  the  city  is 
the  center.  Mr.  Lizer  possesses  the  necessary  qualifications  of  the  successful 
proprietor  of  such  a  journal,  as  he  has  a  keen  sense  of  the  relative  value  of  news, 
writes  clearly  and  forcefully,  is  alert  and  progressive  and  is  also  an  efficient 
business  man. 

On  the  23d  of  June,  1898,  Air.  Lizer  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Mary 
Fenner,  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Mary  (Lizer)  Fenner,  natives  of  Ohio. 
Her  father  was  a  carpenter  and  contractor  by  trade  and  many  years  ago  removed 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  241 

to  Montezuma,  Iowa,  where  he  taught  school  for  a  time.  He  later  turned  his 
attention  again  to  building  and  contracting  and  was  well  known  in  those  lines 
of  work.  He  passed  away  in  that  place  in  1902  and  his  widow  died  a  year 
later.  Mrs.  Lizer  was  a  school  teacher  previous  to  her  marriage  and  for  some 
time  was  principal  of  the  La  Porte  City  schools.  Altogether  she  taught  school 
in  that  city  for  twelve  years. 

Mr.  Lizer  is  a  stockholder  and  director  in  the  First  National  Bank  and  is 
secretary  of  the  local  Building  &  Loan  Association.  In  political  matters  he 
supports  the  men  and  measures  of  the  republican  party  and  is  at  present  the 
chairman  of  the  republican  county  central  committee,  being  quite  influential  in 
local  republican  circles.  For  twelve  years  he  has  served  upon  the  school  board 
and  is  at  present  the  president  of  that  body  and  is  known  as  an  aggressive  cham- 
pion of  the  public  schools.  He  has  also  served  upon  the  city  council.  Frater- 
nally he  belongs  to  Trowel  Lodge,  No.  216,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  to  the  local  lodge 
of  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  His  religious  belief  is  indicated  in  his  membership 
in  the  Presbyterian  church  and  much  of  the  respect  that  he  commands  is  due 
to  the  fact  that  his  life  is  guided  by  the  underlying  principles  of  Christianity. 
In  the  private  relations  of  life  he  has  proved  always  honorable  and  kindly  and 
as  teacher  and  as  editor  he  has  never  forgotten  the  grave  responsibilities  of 
those  who  are  called  upon  to  train  the  children  of  the  nation  or  to  give  to  the 
people  accounts  of  the  current  happenings  and  also  in  a  large  measure  to  mold 
public  opinion. 


IRA  T.  liOOVER. 


Ira  J.  Hoover,  strong  and  purposeful,  possessing  the  spirit  of  initiative  as 
manifest  in  his  ready  recognition  and  improvement  of  opportunities,  is  today 
one  of  the  ablest  financiers  and  most  progressive  business  men  of  Waterloo. 
He  was  born  in  Black  Hawk  county,  July  29,  1876,  a  son  of  Ephraim  and  Eliza- 
beth (Pinkerton)  Hoover,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Wayne  county,  Ohio, 
where  they  were  reared  and  married.  They  came  to  Iowa  in  1875,  settling  on 
what  is  now  the  home  farm  two  and  a  half  miles  southwest  of  Waterloo.  There 
the  father  still  resides,  but  the  mother  passed  away  in  December,  1901,  at  the 
age  of  forty-nine  years. 

Ira  J.  Hoover  was  born  upon  that  place  and  there  remained  to  his  sixteenth 
year,  meeting  the  usual  experiences  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  farm  lad.  Fie 
acquired  his  early  education  in  the  district  schools  and  afterward  attended  the 
Waterloo  Business  College,  the  Upper  Iowa  University  at  Fayette  and  the  Uni- 
versity of  Wisconsin.  His  intentions  were  to  complete  the  course  in  the  last 
named  institution,  but  after  returning  home  during  a  vacation  period  he  was 
asked  to  accept  a  position  with  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  Bank.  This  he  did  and 
remained  a  representative  of  that  institution  for  nine  years,  during  which  time 
he  gained  broad  experience  in  the  knowledge  of  financial  afifairs.  He  entered 
the  bank  as  bookkeeper  and  was  steadily  advanced  until  he  became  assistant 
cashier.  During  his  connection  with  that  institution  he  became  interested  in 
real  estate  and  gradually  drifted  into  land  speculation  and  also  began  buying 


242  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  selling  city  property  until  he  is  today  one  of  the  foremost  real-estate  owners 
of  Waterloo.  He  now  owns  the  Syndicate  building  and  is  secretary  and  treas- 
urer of  the  Mercantile  Warehouse  Company,  an  investment  company  holding 
some  three  hundred  thousand  dollars  worth  of  property  in  the  business  center 
of  Waterloo.  He  is  the  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Black  Hawk  Building 
Company,  which  owns  the  Black  Hawk  Bank  building,  and  he  was  the  dominant 
factor  in  the  organization  of  the  Home  Improvement  Company,  which  was  the 
forerunner  to  the  building  of  the  Russell  Lamson  Hotel,  one  of  the  finest  hostel- 
ries  in  the  middle  west.  The  purpose  of  the  Home  Improvement  Company  was 
to  take  over  seventy-two  lots  owned  by  Mr.  Lamson,  the  builder  of  the  hotel, 
in  order  to  increase  the  capital  stock  of  the  hotel  company.  Mr.  Hoover  volun- 
teered as  one  of  the  leaders  to  push  the  work  along.  For  wrecks  he  worked  in 
the  streets  and  among  the  business  men  and  his  efforts  were  crowned  with  suc- 
cess. The  capital  stock  of  eighty-five  thousand  dollars,  for  which  amount  the 
Home  Improvement  Company  was  capitalized,  was  raised  and  the  building  of 
the  hotel  was  assured.  Mr.  Hoover  is  also  receiver  for  the  Mason  Motor  Com- 
pany, manufacturers  of  motor  trucks  and  automobiles,  which  is  now  undergoing 
a  process  of  rehabilitation  under  his  able  management  and  control. 

Mr.  Hoover  holds  membership  in  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.,  and  in  Water- 
loo Lodge,  No.  290,  B.  P.  O.  E.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Waterloo  Club 
and  is  serving  on  its  board  of  directors.  He  is  a  man  of  marked  determination 
and  carries  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes.  His 
plans  are  formulated  in  keeping  with  modern  business  ideas  and  his  life  is  an 
exemplification  of  the  spirit  of  the  times.  He  is  ever  alert  and  active,  seizing 
every  legitimate  advantage  as  it  arises  and  instituting  a  business  policy  in  con- 
nection with  the  management  of  important  interests  that  results  in  the  attain- 
ment of  desirable  and  notable  success. 


ARTHUR  A.  SHIPPY 


Arthur  A.  Shippy  is  a  member  of  T.  F.  McDonnell  &  Company,  which  is 
one  of  the  leading  contracting  firms  of  Waterloo  and  which  has  erected  many 
handsome  buildings.  He  was  born  in  Franklin  township,  Bremer  county,  Iowa, 
on  the  14th  of  September,  1863,  a  son  of  Charles  S.  and  Rebecca  (Piatt)  Shippy, 
who  were  natives  respectively  of  Canada  and  Illinois.  In  1846  Charles  S. 
Shippy  removed  to  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  where  he  purchased  three  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  of  government  land,  and  for  many  years  he  devoted  his  time  to 
agricultural  pursuits.  In  1894  he  retired  from  active  life,  but  continued  to  live 
upon  his  land  until  his  death,  which  occurred  seven  years  later,  in  June,  1901. 
His  wife  died  on  the  2d  of  April,  1900.  They  had  nine  children,  namely : 
Elmer,  a  resident  of  Oran,  Iowa,  where  he  is  engaged  in  merchandising ;  Arthur 
A.,  of  this  review ;  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  Russell  Sutton,  who  is  living  in  Colo- 
rado ;  Addie,  who  makes  her  home  with  her  sister,  Mrs.  Sutton  ;  Algie,  deceased ; 
Wilbur  and  Leroy,  both  of  whom  live  in  Colorado ;  Leon,  who  is  a  resident  of 
the  state  of  Washington;  and  Ethelyn,  the  wife  of  Jesse  Clark,  a  farmer  of 
Oran,  Iowa. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  243 

* 

Arthur  A.  Shippy  passed  his  boyhood  days  in  much  the  manner  of  other 
farmer  lads  of  this  locaHty,  attending  the  district  schools  in  the  winter  months 
and  aiding  with  the  cultivation  of  the  fields  and  the  care  of  the  stock  in  the 
summers.  In  addition  to  the  traming  in  agricultural  work  that  he  thus  received 
he  was  taught  the  carpenter's  trade  by  his  father,  who  was  something  of  a  con- 
tractor as  well  as  a  farmer.  When  seventeen  years  of  age  our  subject  went  to 
the  Pacific  coast  and  did  carpenter  work  in  various  western  states  until  1884. 
when  he  returned  to  Iowa  and  settled  in  Waterloo.  He  later  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Chicago  &  Great  Western  Railroad  in  the  bridge  construction 
department  and  remained  with  them  until  1S87.  when  he  became  connected 
with  a  wholesale  house  in  Waterloo  and  so  continued  for  four  years.  At  the 
end  of  that  time  he  again  began  work  at  his  trade  and  in  1901,  feeling  that  con- 
tracting offered  a  more  lucrative  field  than  the  carpenter's  trade  in  itself,  he 
decided  to  enter  that  line  of  business  and  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Shippy 
&  Burke  of  Waterloo.  In  1912  the  partnership  was  dissolved  and  during  1913 
Mr.  Shippy  was  alone  in  the  conduct  of  his  business.  In  1914,  however,  T.  F. 
McDonnell,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  elsewhere  in  this  work,  became  associ- 
ated with  him  as  an  equal  partner  in  the  formation  of  the  firm  of  T.  F.  McDon- 
nell t&  Company.  They  do  general  contracting  and  erect  many  of  the  buildings 
put  up  in  the  county,  as  their  work  is  thorough  and  their  prices  reasonable  and 
as  they  have  the  reputation  of  living  strictly  up  to  their  contracts.  Much  of 
the  success  of  the  firm  must  be  credited  to  the  practical  knowledge  and  the 
Ijusiness  ability  of  Mr.  Shippy.  T.  F.  McDonnell  &  Company  have  erected  an 
unusually  large  number  of  schoolhouses  in  Waterloo  and  the  buildings  have  all 
given  satisfaction. 

Mr.  Shippy  was  married  on  the  2d  of  September,  1908,  to  Miss  Anna  Wil- 
kening,  who  is  a  native  of  Iowa  and  a  daughter  of  John  and  Caroline  Wilken- 
ing.  Her  parents,  who  are  natives  respectively  of  Germany  and  Pennsylvania, 
came  to  Iowa  about  the  same  time  as  did  the  parents  of  Air.  Shippy. 

The  last  named  is  a  republican  but  has  been  so  engrossed  in  his  business 
affairs  that  he  has  found  no  time  to  take  an  active  part  in  politics.  Fraternally 
he  belongs  to  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  He  is  interested  in  outdoor  sports, 
especially  in  baseball,  and  greatly  enjoys  seeing  a  well  played  game.  In  his 
business  aggressiveness  and  in  the  personal  relations  of  life  he  measures  up  to 
a  high  standard  of  manhood  and  can  l)e  counted  upon  to  stand  for  all  that 
is  best  in  community  affairs. 


BENJAMIN  F.  SWISHER. 

In  no  profession  does  advancement  depend  more  entirely  upon  individual 
merit  and  ability  than  in  the  practice  of  law  and,  recognizing  this  fact  at  the 
outset  of  his  career,  Benjamin  F.  Swisher  has  gradually  and  persistently  worked 
his  way  upward  through  the  cultivation  of  those  qualities  and  talents  which  lead 
to  success  in  the  work  of  the  courts.  He  is  now  well  versed  in  legal  principles 
and  his  energy  and  determination  have  prompted  his  careful  preparation  of  his 
cases  so  that  he  enters  the  court  room  well  qualified  to  present  his  cause. 


244  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Air.  Swisher  was  born  in  Johnson  county,  Iowa,  in  1878,  a  son  of  Lovell 
Swisher,  a  banker  of  Iowa  City.  It  was  in  the  schools  of  that  place  that  he 
pursued  his  preliminary  education,  passing  through  consecutive  grades  until 
graduated  from  the  high  school.  He  afterward  entered  the  University  of  Iowa, 
in  which  he  won  the  Bachelor  of  Philosophy  degree  with  the  class  of  1899. 
He  then  continued  in  the  same  institution  for  the  study  of  law  and  was  gradu- 
ated LL.  B.  with  the  class  of  1900,  completing  the  collegiate  and  law  courses  in 
five  years.  He  then  entered  the  office  of  Mullan  &  Pickett  and  remained  with 
that  firm  for  three  years  before  opening  an  office  of  his  own  in  the  fall  of  1903. 
He  was  elected  city  solicitor  in  the  spring  of  1905  and  served  for  three  terms 
and  on  the  ist  of  September,  1913,  he  entered  into  his  present  partnership  with 
C.  E.  Pickett  under  the  firm  style  of  Pickett  &  Swisher.  This  is  today  regarded 
as  one  of  the  strong  law^  firms  of  the  county.  Such  are  Mr.  Swisher's  force  of 
character  and  natural  qualifications  that  he  has  steadily  overcome  ail  the  obsta- 
cles that  he  has  met  and  few  lawyers  ha\e  made  a  more  lasting  impression  upon 
the  bar  of  Black  Hawk  county  both  for  marked  ability  of  a  high  order  and  for 
the  individuality  of  a  personal  character  which  impresses  itself  upon  the  com- 
munity. In  the  line  of  his  profession  he  has  membership  in  the  Black  Hawk 
County  Bar  Association  and  the  American  Bar  Association. 

In  1902  Mr.  Swisher  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Helen  Field  Moulton, 
who  was  born  in  Mills  county,  Iowa,  but  for  a  few  years  prior  to  he*  marriage 
was  a  resident  of  Exeter,  New  Hampshire.  They  have  become  the  parents  of 
three  children.   Martha   Elizabeth,   Benjamin   Field  and   Helen  Moulton. 

Air.  and  Mrs.  Swisher  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church  and  are 
prominent  in  social  circles  of  the  city.  In  politics  Mr.  Swisher  has  always  been 
a  stalwart  republican  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  the  w^ork  of  his  party.  He 
has  done  considerable  campaigning  in  both  the  county  and  state  and  at  one 
time  he  was  a  candidate  for  the  office  of  district  judge.  Fraternally  he  is  con- 
nected with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  is  interested  in 
all  of  its  projects  for  the  upbuilding  and  development  of  the  city,  while  along 
more  strictly  social  lines  he  is  connected  with  the  Waterloo  Club  and  with  the 
Waterloo  Golf  and  Country  Club.  Well  known,  he  has  a  circle  of  friends  that 
is  extensive,  and  the  high  regard  entertained  for  him  is  an  indication  of  a  well 
spent  life. 


M.  B.  NEFF. 


During  the  past  decade  M.  B.  Nefl:'  has  been  a  successful  representative  of 
real-estate  and  insurance  interests  in  Waterloo,  maintaining  an  office  at  No.  228 
West  Fourth  street,  and  has  built  up  an  extensive  business  along  these  lines. 
His  birth  occurred  in  Clark  county,  Missouri,  in  1871,  his  parents  being  John 
and  Amanda  Nefl^.  They  had  five  children,  two  daughters  and  three  sons,  all 
of  whom  survive. 

AI.  B.  Neff  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
state  and  subsecjucntly  continued  his  studies  in  the  State  Normal  School  at  Kirks- 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  245 

ville,  Missouri.  After  finishing  his  school  work  he  turned  his  attention  to  general 
agricultural  pursuits  and  followed  farming  until  1901,  in  which  year  he  disposed 
of  his  property  and  came  to  Waterloo,  Iowa.  Here  he  entered  the  service  of 
the  Cedar  Valley  Manufacturing  Company,  being  employed  in  the  sash  and  door 
department  for  three  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  opened  a 
real-estate  and  insurance  office  in  the  Black  Hawk  Bank  block  and  has  carried 
on  business  along  that  line  continuously  and  successfully  since.  He  has  made 
a  specialty  of  building  residences  for  subsequent  sale  and  also  handles  farm 
lands  in  Iowa  and  adjoining  states.  He  owns  both  business  and  residence  prop- 
erty in  West  Waterloo  and  a  tract  of  sixteen  acres  inside  the  city  limits,  while 
he  is  likewise  a  director  of  the  Peoples  Mutual  Building  &  Loan  Association  of 
Waterloo,  the  first  organization  of  its  kind  in  the  city.  His  business  interests 
have  been  carefully  directed  and  have  brought  him  a  gratifying  and  well  deserved 
measure  of  prosperity. 

In  1901  Mr.  Nefi  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  Catlett,  who  was  born 
in  California  and  was  reared  near  Santa  Barbara,  that  state,  her  father,  Ezra 
Catlett,  being^a  ranchman  there.  She  is  one  of  a  family  of  six  children,  four 
daughters  and  two  sons,  all  of  whom  are  yet  Hving.  Prior  to  her  marriage 
she  was  a  trained  nurse.  Mr.  Nefif  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy 
but  is  not  bitterly  partisan,  not  seeking  office  and  in  afifairs  of  general  moment 
taking  the  attitude  of  a  liberal-minded  and  public-spirited  citizen.  He  is  iden- 
tified fraternally  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  and  in  religious  faith  his  wife 
is  a  Congregationalist.  He  is  known  as  a  man  of  high  character,  of  marked 
business  ability  and  enterprise,  whose  sterling  qualities  have  Avon  for  him  the 
confidence  of  a  large  circle  of  friends  and  acquaintances  in  Waterloo  and  Black 
Hawk  county. 


G.  E.  NEWTON. 


G.  E.  Newton  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Bruner  &  Newton,  proprietors 
of  a  plumbing  and  heating  establishment  and  conducting  a  general  jobbing  busi- 
ness in  plumbers'  supplies.  He  was  born  in  Gatesville,  Clayton  county,  Iowa, 
December  7,  1879,  a  son  of  Fred  E.  and  Eliza  J.  (Hollar)  Newton.  The  father's 
birth  occurred  in  Oswego  county.  New  York,  on  the  7th  of  August,  1857,  '^^^^ 
the  mother  was  born  near  Raymond,  Iowa,  on  the  226.  of  July,  1858,  her  parents 
having  been  pioneer  settlers  of  Black  Hawk  county.  Fred  E.  Newton  began 
farming  in  early  life  and  has  always  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits 
save  for  the  period  which  he  spent  in  public  office.  He  now  resides  six  miles 
north  of  Waverly  and  is  still  actively  engaged  in  the  work  of  tilling  the  soil.  At 
one  time  he  served  as  deputy  sherifif  of  Dubuque  county  and  made  an  excellent 
record  as  a  capable  and  trustworthy  official. 

G.  E.  Newton  is  the  eldest  in  a  family  of  three  children.  He  attended  the 
public  schools  of  Monticello,  Iowa,  and  afterward  the  schools  of  Manchester 
but  put  aside  his  text-books  when  he  reached  the  age  of  seventeen  years  and 
began  learning  the  plumber's  trade  at  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  where  he  remained 
for  three  years.     Lie  afterward  spent  two  and  a  half  years  in  Manchester  as  an 


246  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

employe  at  the  plumbing  business  and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  came  to 
Waterloo,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  Zook  &  Bentz,  continuing  with  that 
firm  for  five  years.  He  then  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account,  form- 
ing a  partnership  with  J.  B.  Bruner  under  the  firm  style  of  Bruner  &  Newton. 
They  opened  a  general  plumbing  and  heating  establishment  and  not  only  handle 
supplies  of  that  character  but  also  do  all  kinds  of  repair  work  and  conduct  a 
general  jobbing  business  in  plumbing  supplies.  Mr.  Newton  has  concentrated 
his  efforts  upon  the  upbuilding  of  the  trade  with  good  results,  for  the  firm  now 
has  a  liberal  patronage  and  from  the  business  derives  a  gratifying  annual  income. 

On  the  loth  of  July,  1898,  Mr.  Newton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Alice  E.  McKray,  a  native  of  Greeley,  Delaware  county,  Iowa,  and  a  daughter 
of  William  and  Flora  (Chase)  McKray.  Her  father  was  a  butcher  by  trade 
and  is  now  deceased.  He  never  came  to  this  county.  Her  mother  still  survives 
and  is  a  resident  of  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  Mrs.  Newton  died  on  the  8th  of 
December,  1914,  leaving  four  children,  namely:  Ruby  Helen,  Ralph  Eugene, 
Alice  Mae  and  Wanda  Juanita. 

Mr.  Newton  is  a  Mason,  holding  membership  in  the  blue  lodge,  the  chapter, 
commandery  and  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias 
fraternity,  to  the  Travelers  Protective  Association  and  to  the  Commercial  Club 
and  Board  of  Trade.  He  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the 
men  and  measures  of  the  republican  party  but  has  never  been  a  politician  in 
the  sense  of  office  seeking.  He  has  always  felt  that  in  order  to  advance  in 
business  he  must  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  duties,  whether  in  the 
employ  of  others  or  in  the  conduct  of  his  own  business,  and  it  has  been  by 
reason  of  his  unremitting  energy  and  persistency  of  purpose  that  he  has  gained 
the  comfortable  competence  that  he  now  enjoys. 


EDWARD  J.  WENNER. 

Iowa  has  always  been  distinguished  for  the  high  rank  of  her  bench  and  bar 
and  almost  every  town  as  well  as  city  claims  those  who  are  able  to  cross  swords 
in  forensic  combat  with  the  ablest  lawyers  of  the  country.  Electing  to  engage  in 
law  practice  as  a  life  work,  Edward  J.  Wenner  has  continuously  advanced 
in  this  difficult  and  arduous  profession  and  today  is  accorded  a  large  and  dis- 
tinctively representative  clientage  in  recognition  of  the  ability  which  he  has 
developed  and  which  places  him  among  the  able  representatives  of  the  bar  in 
Black  Hawk  county.  He  has  followed  his  profession  in  Waterloo  since  October, 
1904,  arriving  here  when  a  young  man  of  twenty- four  years,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  Benton  county,  Iowa,  July  3,  1880.  He  is  a  son  of  Christian  and 
Margaret  (Cokely)  Wenner,  who  in  the  '50s  settled  in  Benton  county,  Iowa, 
where  the  father  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits.  He  has  now  passed  away 
but  his  widow  still  resides  in  that  county. 

Edward  J.  Wenner  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  in  the  Tilford 
Collegiate  Academy  at  Vinton,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class 
of  1900.  On  the  completion  of  his  more  specifically  literary  course  he  entered 
the  College  of  Law  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa  and  secured  his  LL.   B. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  247 

degree  upon  graduation  with  the  class  of  1903.  He  afterward  gained  the  Master's 
degree  upon  graduation  from  Yale  University  in  1904,  having  pursued  a  year's 
post-graduate  work  in  that  institution.  He  was  admitted  to  the  Iowa  bar  in 
1903,  and  in  October,  1904,  located  for  practice  in  Waterloo,  where  he  entered 
into  partnership  with  E.  H.  McCoy  under  the  firm  name  of  Wenner  &  McCoy. 
This  connection  was  continued  until  1909,  since  which  time  Mr.  Wenner  has 
been  alone  in  practice.  He  has  acted  for  the  plaintiff  or  defendant  in  many 
important  cases  tried  in  both  the  state  and  federal  courts  and  he  has  displayed 
comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  principles  of  jurisprudence,  together  with  an 
assiduous  and  unrelaxing  attention  to  all  the  details  of  his  cases  and  a  most 
careful  regard  for  the  interests  of  his  clients.  His  standing  among  his  fellow 
members  of  the  bar  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  been  honored  with  the 
position  of  secretary  of  the  Black  Hawk  County  Bar  Association.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Iowa  State  Bar  Association.  In  1914  he  was  elected  county 
attorney  of  Black  Hawk  county  on  the  republican  ticket  and  is  now  the  able 
incumbent.  While  the  practice  of  law  has  been  his  chief  life  work,  he  has 
also  become  interested  in  other  business  enterprises  and  projects. 

Mr.  Wenner  is  recognized  as  a  leading  representative  of  the  republican  party 
in  Black  Hawk  county,  has  frequently  been  a  delegate  to  the  state  conventions 
and  does  all  in  his  power  to  further  republican  successes  because  of  his  firm 
belief  in  the  efficacy  and  value  of  party  principles  as  a  factor  in  good  govern- 
ment. He  has  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  has  served  as  chan- 
cellor commander  of  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  and  for  the  past  five  years  has  been 
a  representative  in  the  Grand  Lodge  of  Iowa.  He  also  has  membership  with 
the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  and  was  the  first  dictator  of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No. 
328.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Supreme  Lodge,  attended  the  national  meetings 
at  Baltimore,  Cincinnati  and  Milwaukee  and  is  district  deputy  supreme  dictator 
for  the  district  of  Iowa.  He  likewise  has  membership  with  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  has  been  a  delegate  to  the  state  convention  of  that 
organization  on  two  or  three  occasions.  He  has  membership  in  the  Fraternal 
Aid  Union  at  Denver  and  has  served  for  six  years  as  a  member  of  the  law 
committee  of  the  Supreme  Lodge.  He  has  membership  in  the  Commercial 
Club  and  Board  of  Trade  and  the  Town  Criers  Club. 

On  the  17th  of  August,  1910,  Mr.  Wenner  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Parrott,  a  daughter  of  W.  F.  Parrott,  who  was  associated  with  The 
Reporter  of  Waterloo,  and  a  granddaughter  of  ex-Lieutenant  Governor  Matt 
Parrott.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wenner  have  one  son,  Frank  William.  The  family  attend 
Christ  Episcopal  church,  and  in  social  circles  they  occupy  an  enviable  position, 
while  their  own  home  is  the  abode  of  warm-hearted  hospitality. 


CLAUDE  E.  DOAK. 


Claude  E.  Doak,  one  of  the  representative  business  men  and  influential 
citizens  of  Cedar  Falls,  is  the  president  of  Doak's  Transfer  &  Storage  Company, 
which  he  organized  in  1909,  under  the  name  of  the  Cedar  Falls  Transfer  & 
Storage  Company,  for  the  purpose  of  storing  and  distributing  machinery  through 


248  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

northern  Iowa.  His  birth  occurred  in  Lees,  IlHnois,  on  the  ist  of  June,  1880, 
his  parents  being  Samuel  S.  and  Clara  (Waters)  Doak.  The  father  was  iden- 
tified with  railroad  interests  for  a  period  covering  thirty-six  years,  acting  as 
traveling  passenger  agent  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company  for  a 
number  of  years.  He  was  a  very  popular  official  and  enjoyed  an  extensive 
acquaintance.  His  demise  occurred  at  St.  Paul,  ^Minnesota,  in  April,  1907, 
when  he  had  attained  the  age  of  fifty-four  years. 

Claude  E.  Doak  was  reared  at  the  family  home  in  Webster  City,  Hamilton 
county,  Iowa,  where  his  father  was  located  for  a  number  of  years  and  long 
served  as  a  member  of  the  school  board,  being  also  prominent  in  Masonic  cir- 
cles. Our  subject  acquired  his  education  in  the  Webster  City  schools  and  at 
the  Capital  City  Commercial  College  of  Des  Moines,  Iowa.  Subsequently  he 
identified  himself  with  railroad  work  as  cashier  of  the  freight  house  of  the 
Chicago  &  Northwestern  Railway  Company  at  Webster  City.  About  three 
A^ears  later  he  accepted  the  position  of  paymaster  for  the  Faust  Construction 
Company  on  construction  work  in  the  building  of  the  Great  Northern  Railroad 
through  North  and  South  Dakota.  He  next  went  to  Tacoma,  Washington, 
where  his  father  was  then  located,  and  took  a  position  in  the  dispatcher's  office 
of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company.  Not  finding  the  coast  country  to 
his  liking,  however,  he  returned  to  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  at  the  end  of  about 
eight  months  and  went  to  work  for  the  Harrison,  Cole  Brothers,  Incorporated, 
manufacturers  of  stair  work  and  interior  finish  and  extensive  lumber  dealers. 
Mr.  Doak  was  made  traffic  manager  of  the  company  and  continued  with  it  for 
about  five  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period,  however,  he  resigned  his 
position  and  w^ent  to  Waterloo,  where  he  organized  a  freight  traffic  bureau  for 
the  purpose  of  auditing  freight  overcharges  for  heavy  shippers,  etc.  At  the 
end  of  about  a  year  he  returned  to  Cedar  Falls  and  made  up  a  routing  and 
freight  book  for  the  manufacturers  of  the  city  which  showed  the  proper  rates 
and  routing  for  fourteen  states.  This  was  conceded  to  be  the  best  rate  book 
of  so  comprehensive  a  character  ever  compiled  up  to  that  time  and  is  still  used 
by  many  of  the  shippers  of  this  section.  In  1909  he  organized  the  Cedar  Falls 
Transfer  &  Storage  Company  for  the  purpose  of  storing  and  distributing  machin- 
ery through  northern  Iowa  and  was  made  president  and  manager  of  the  con- 
cern, having  served  in  the  dual  capacity  to  the  present  time.  In  the  intervening 
years,  however,  he  absorbed  the  stock  of  the  company  and  diverted  it  into 
Doak's  Transfer  &  Storage  Company,  under  which  name  the  enterprise  is  now 
conducted.  Mr.  Doak  also  deals  in  coal  and  enjoys  an  enviable  reputation  as 
one  of  the  leading,  progressive  and  representative  business  men  of  Cedar  Falls. 

In  1905  Air.  Doak  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Dorothy  B.  Coryell,  of 
Cedar  Falls,  by  whom  he  has  two  children,  Dorothy  C.  and  James  Russell.  He 
gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and  is  a  member  of  the 
present  city  council  of  Cedar  Falls,  serving  a  four-year  term.  He  acts  as  chair- 
man of  the  street  and  alley  committee  and  it  is  worthy  of  note  that  Cedar  Falls 
has  gained  its  reputation  as  one  of  the  best  paved  cities  in  the  state  by  reason 
of  the  work  which  has  been  done  in  the  past  four  years.  In  the  summer  of 
1914,  deeming  it  necessary  to  devote  his  entire  attention  to  his  business  interests, 
he  resigned  from  the  council,  but  his  resignation  was  not  accepted.  He  is 
identified   fraternally  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Knights 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  249 

of  Pythias,  belonging  to  Red  Cedar  Lodge,  No.  83,  of  the  latter  organization. 
Air.  Doak  is  also  a  valued  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  acts  as  vestry- 
man in  the  Episcopal  church,  with  which  his  wife  is  likewise  affiliated.  They 
are  highly  esteemed  in  the  city  of  their  residence  and  the  circle  of  their  friends 
is  an  extensive  one. 


J.  P.  JEPSEN. 


J.  P.  Jepsen,  secretary  and  general  manager  of  the  Townsend  &  Merrill 
Company  and  identified  with  various  other  business  enterprises,  belongs  to  that 
class  of  men. whose  energy  and  determination  in  business  affairs  constitute  an 
element  in  the  city's  progress  as  well  as  in  individual  success.  He  is  therefore 
well  known  as  one  of  the  leading  residents  of  Cedar  Falls  and  enjoys  in  large 
measure  the  respect  and  regard  of  his  fellow  townsmen  who  accord  him  high 
rank  as  a  business  man,  as  a  citizen  and  as  a  friend. 

He  was  born  in  Schleswig,  Germany,  in  1865,  and  acquired  his  education  in 
the  schools  of  that  country.  Lie  came  to  America  in  1885  when  a  young  man 
of  twenty  years,  arriving  in  Cedar  Falls  on  the  ist  of  August.  He  worked  as 
a  farm  hand  by  the  month  for  two  years  and  then  turned  his  attention  to  car- 
pentering, being  employed  by  others  for  a  few  years,  after  which  he  began 
taking  contracts  in  the  building  line  in  and  around  Cedar  Falls.  He  followed 
that  business  with  growing  success  until  1895,  when  he  accepted  the  position 
of  foreman  with  the  Townsend  &  Merrill  Company,  lumber  merchants.  In 
1900  the  business  was  reorganized  and  incorporated  as  a  stock  company  and 
has  since  been  known  as  the  Townsend  &  Merrill  Company.  Mr.  Jepsen  con- 
tinued as  foreman  until  1904,  at  which  time  he  became  the  successor  of  Mr. 
Merrill,  who  had  passed  away.  He  has  since  been  secretary  and  general  man- 
ager of  the  business  and  is  also  one  of  the  stockholders  and  directors.  This 
company  occupies  a  prominent  position  in  lumber  trade  circles  of  Iowa,  owning 
and  operating  eight  yards.  The  main  office  is  at  Cedar  Falls,  in  addition  to 
which  they  have  seven  other  yards,  Mr.  Jepsen  having  supervision  over  the  entire 
business.  The  different  plants  are  located  at  Hampton,  Faulkner,  Ackley,  New 
Hartford,  Dike,  Hubbard  and  Industry,  Iowa,  while  their  yard  at  Cedar  Falls 
is  the  most  extensive  in  Black  Hawk  county  and  their  sales  cover  a  wide  ter- 
ritory. They  carry  everything  in  connection  with  the  building  business  and  their 
patronage  is  growing  year  by  year.  They  have  ever  recognized  the  fact  that 
satisfied  patrons  are  the  best  advertisement  and  have  always  closely  adhered 
to  the  old  axiom  that  honesty  is  the  best  policy. 

As  Mr.  Jepsen  has  achieved  success,  enabling  him  to  command  a  greater 
or  less  amount  of  capital,  he  has  extended  his  investments  and  efforts  into 
other  fields  and  is  now  a  stockholder  in  the  Citizens  Bank  of  Cedar  Falls,  in 
the  Viking  Pump  Company  of  Cedar  Falls  and  the  Danish  Insurance  Company 
of  Cedar  Falls,  of  which  he  is  the  vice  president  and  one  of  the  directors.  He 
is  also  a  stockholder  in  several  other  home  manufacturing  interests.  Whatever 
he  undertakes  he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion  and  he  seems  to 
recognize  the  possibilities   of  any  business  situation.     His  judgment  is   sound. 


250  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

his  energy  unfaltering  and  as  years  have  gone  on  he  has  made  for  himself  a 
most  creditable  position  in  commercial  circles. 

In  1892  Mr.  Jepsen  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  C.  Hostrop,  who 
was  born  in  Iowa  City,  a  daughter  of  Detlef  and  Anna  Hostrop,  both  of  whom 
were  natives  of  Schleswig,  Germany,  and  at  an  early  day  settled  in  Iowa  near 
Iowa  City.  ^Ir.  and  'Sirs.  Jepsen  have  become  the  parents  of  three  daughters: 
Anna  Marie,  who  is  attending  the  Iowa  Teachers  College;  Jennie  D.,  a  gradu- 
ate of  the  high  school  of  Cedar  Falls  and  now  a  student  in  the  Iowa  Teachers 
College;  and  Mildred  E.,  who  is  attending  high  school.  The  family  occupy  one 
of  the  fine  residences  of  Cedar  Falls,  the  property  being  owned  by  Mr.  Jepsen. 

In  politics  he  is  a  republican,  but  not  an  office  seeker.  He  and  his  family 
are  of  the  Lutheran  faith  and  they  occupy  an  enviable  position  in  social  circles, 
the  hospitality  of  the  best  homes  of  the  city  being  cordially  extended  them. 
The  record  of  Mr.  Jepsen  should  serve  to  inspire  and  encourage  others,  show- 
ing what  may  be  accomplished  when  sound  judgment  points  out  the  way  and 
persistency  of  purpose  prompts  continuance  therein.  Since  coming  to  the  new 
world  at  the  age  of  twenty  years,  practically  empty-handed,  he  has  advanced 
step  by  step  and  has  essentially  formulated  and  given  shape  to  his  own  char- 
acter as  well  as  to  his  success. 


ANDREW  G.  RETD. 


Andrew  G.  Reid  is  numbered  among  the  able  lawyers  practicing  at  the  bar 
of  Black  Hawk  county  and  through  merit  and  ability  has  gained  a  good  clientage. 
He  was  born  in  Warren  county,  Illinois,  a  son  of  Jesse  W.  Reid,  who  was 
a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  came  to  this  state  in  his  boyhood  days.  He 
was  married  in  Iowa  to  Miss  Emma  Stillings  and  passed  away  in  1889.  During 
the  period  of  his  residence  in  Iowa  he  was  largely  engaged  in  farming  in  Madi- 
son county  and  lived  a  busy  and  useful  life. 

Andrew  G.  Reid  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  system  of  this  state  for  the 
early  educational  opportunities  which  he  enjoyed.  He  was  afterward  gradu- 
ated from  Simpson  College  in  the  class  of  1901  with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree. 
He  then  entered  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann 
Arbor  and  was  graduated  with  the  LL.  B.  degree  in  the  class  of  1906.  Taking 
up  the  profession  of  teaching,  he  was  assistant  professor  of  mathematics  in 
Monmouth  College  of  Monmouth,  Illinois,  where  he  was  also  athletic  director 
for  three  years.  In  1910  he  came  to  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  been  engaged 
in  practice  in  all  of  the  courts  of  the  state  and  in  the  federal  courts.  He  has 
continued  in  the  general  practice  of  law  and  is  well  versed  in  the  various 
branches  of  his  profession.  His  arguments  have  elicited  warm  commendation 
not  only  from  his  associates  at  the  bar  but  also  from  the  bench.  His  briefs 
always  show  wide  research,  careful  thought  and  the  best  and  strongest  reasons 
Vv'hich  can  be  urged  for  his  contention,  presented  in  cogent  and  logical  form. 

Mr.  Reid  is  a  member  of  the  county  bar  association.  He  is  also  a  member 
of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  while 
his   religious   faith   is   manifest   in   his  membership   in   the   United    Presbyterian 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  251 

church.  He  is  a  young  man  but  one  who  has  made  a  creditable  record  in  his 
professional  career.  Steadily  he  has  worked  his  way  upward,  recognizing  that 
in  the  practice  of  law  ability  is  the  keynote  of  advancement. 


E.  O.  ROBERTS. 


E.  O.  Roberts  is  the  owner  of  a  well  improved  farm,  his  place  being  situated 
on  section  i6,  where  he  has  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  rich  and  productive 
land.  He  was  born  December  6,  1869,  in  the  township  which  is  still  his  home, 
his  parents  being  John  W.  and  Ann  M.  (Sroufe)  Roberts,  the  former  a  native 
of  Indiana  and  the  latter  of  Ohio.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupation, 
devoting  his  life  to  that  pursuit.  He  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  with  his 
parents  when  but  six  years  of  age,  arriving  in  1850,  and  here  he  was  reared  and 
educated.  He  received  practical  training  in  the  work  of  the  fields  and  when  old 
enough  he  began  farming  on  his  own  account.  At  length  he  purchased  land  in 
Spring  Creek  township,  developing  the  tract  and  continuing  its  cultivation  for 
many  years,  transforming  the  place  into  one  of  the  valuable  farm  properties  of 
the  district.  At  length  he  retired  and  removed  to  La  Porte  City,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  make  his  home  until  he  was  called  to  his  final  rest,  his  death  occurring 
June  2,  191 1.     His  widow  survives  and  yet  lives  in  La  Porte  City. 

E.  O.  Roberts  was  reared  and  educated  in  this  county  and  is  indebted  to  its 
public-school  system  for  the  opportunities  for  mental  discipline  which  he  enjoyed. 
Through  the  periods  of  vacation  he  worked  in  the  fields  and  thus  had  practical 
training  in  the  various  phases  of  farming.  He  remained  with  his  parents  until 
he  reached  the  age  of  twenty-six  years,  after  which  he  rented  land  which  he 
cultivated  for  six  years.  He  then  bought  fifty  acres  in  Spring  Creek  township 
which  he  continued  to  farm  for  six  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  sold  out 
and  invested  in  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  on  section  16,  since  which  time  he 
has  added  many  improvements  to  the  place  and  now  has  one  of  the  valuable 
farms  in  the  county.  The  buildings  are  substantial  and  the  place  is  enclosed 
with  well  kept  fences  which  also  divide  the  farm  into  fields  of  convenient  size. 
The  machinery  is  modern  and  the  work  accomplished  is  substantial.  Mr.  Rob- 
erts is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Farmers  Produce  Elevator  Company  and  in 
the  Farmers  Telephone  Company.  He  raises  high  grade  stock,  making  a  specialty 
of  Duroc-Jersey  hogs  and  from  the  sale  of  these  he  derives  a  gratifying  annual 
income. 

On  the  nth  of  December,  1895,  Mr.  Roberts  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Alary  Fry,  a  daughter  of  George  and  Harriet  (McDonald)  Fry,  pioneer 
settlers  of  this  county.  The  father  was  born  in  Wisconsin  July  30,  1849,  ^"<^ 
the  mother  in  Illinois  August  14,  1845.  Mr.  Fry  was  a  stonemason,  which  trade 
he  followed  during  the  greater  part  of  his  active  life.  He  is  now  living  with 
a  son  in  Wisconsin,  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  1886.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roberts 
are  the  parents  of  three  children,  George,  Gorman  and  Gladon,  aged  fifteen, 
ten  and  two  years  respectively.  Mr.  Roberts  holds  membership  with  the  Ameri- 
can Yeomen  and  he  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  democratic  party.     Religiously  he  is  a  Methodist  and  to  the 


352  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

faith  and  teachings  of  the  church  he  closely  adheres.  His  well  spent  life  has 
won  him  high  regard  and  his  circle  of  friends  in  this  county  is  almost  coextensive 
with  the  circle  of  his  acquaintance. 


C.  L.  KINGSLEY. 


C.  L.  Kingsley  is  a  representative  of  that  class  of  capable,  broad-minded 
business  men  whose  efforts  are  an  element  in  advancing  general  prosperity  as 
well  as  promoting  individual  success.  In  all  of  his  business  career  his  plans 
have  been  carefully  formulated  and  he  has  displayed  tireless  energy,  keen  per- 
ception and  honesty  of  purpose  as  well  as  a  genius  for  devising  the  right  thing 
at  the  right  time.  He  is  today  prominently  and  widely  known  as  the  owner  of 
the  Indng  Hotel,  as  vice  president  of  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank  and 
as  a  factor  in  the  successful  control  and  management  of  numerous  other  important 
business  concerns. 

A  native  of  Toledo,  Ohio,  Mr.  Kingsley  is  a  son  of  Robert  M.  and  Julia 
(Fletcher)  Kingsley  and  was  about  twelve  years  of  age  when  brought  by  his 
parents  to  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since  made  his  home.  He  continued  his 
education  through  successive  grades  in  the  public  schools  until  he  became  a 
high-school  pupil  and  later  he  was  graduated  from  Bryant  &  Stratton  Business 
College  of  Chicago  and  also  from  the  Chicago  Athenaeum,  being  thus  well  quali- 
fied by  thorough  training  for  the  duties  and  responsibilities  of  business  life. 
Upon  his  return  to  ^^'aterloo  he  became  connected  with  insurance  interests  as 
a  representative  of  life  insurance  and  later  took  up  fire  insurance.  His  advance- 
ment was  a  foregone  conclusion  because  of  his  laudable  ambition,  his  unabating 
industry  and  his  firm  purpose.  In  1886  he  became  general  state  agent  and 
adjuster  for  all  of  the  country  west  of  Chicago  to  Salt  Lake  and  from  Duluth, 
Minnesota,  to  El  Paso,  Texas.  He  remained  with  that  company  for  fourteen 
years,  discharging  with  marked  capability  the  onerous,  difficult  and  ofttimes 
delicate  duties  that  devolved  upon  him  in  that  connection.  On  the  ist  of  July, 
1900,  he  took  charge  of  the  Irving  liotel.  which  his  father  had  conducted  since 
1889.  Under  the  management  of  C  L.  Kingsley  it  has  been  enlarged  until  there 
are  now  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  guest  rooms  with  store  and  business  rooms- 
below.  The  building,  one  hundred  and  sixty  by  ninety  feet,  is  three  stories  in 
height  and  the  hotel  is  conducted  according  to  modern  methods  in  vogue  in  all 
the  leading  hostelries  of  the  day.  ^Ir.  Kingsley  has  installed  every  comfort 
and  convenience  for  the  guests  and  the  hotel  is  liberally  patronized.  lie  is  also 
a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company  and 
is  president  of  the  Home  Park  Land  &  Investment  Company.  He  is  richly 
endowed  with  that  quality  which  too  many  lack — every  day  common  sense— 
and  added  to  this  is  a  resistless  power  which  enables  him  to  overcome  all  obsta- 
cles and  difficulties  in  his  path.  He  has  platted  and  laid  out  Kingbard  Hill 
addition  to  Waterloo,  adding  much  thereby  to  the  beauty  of  the  city,  and  he 
has  been  prominently  identified  with  the  development  and  growth  of  Waterloo 
for  an  extended  period. 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  253 

On  the  6th  of  October,  1886,  Mr.  Kingsley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
•Mary  Plubbard,  of  Waterloo,  and  the  hospitality  of  their  home  is  enjoyed  by 
a  circle  of  friends  that  is  only  limited  by  the  circle  of  their  acquaintance. 

While  Mr.  Kingsley's  business  activity  alone  would  entitle  him  to  mention 
as  a  prominent  resident  of  Waterloo,  his  efforts  along  the  line  of  citizenship 
have  been  of  notable  value.  He  has  been  a  cooperant  factor  in  many  of  the 
plans  and  projects  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  for  the  upbuilding  of  the 
city.  He  belongs  also  to  the  Waterloo  Club  and  the  Town  Criers  Club,  and 
in  fraternal  circles  is  well  known.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  the  degrees  of 
the  Knights  Templar  Commandery  and  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  belongs  to  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  and  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  grand  trustees  of  the  Benevo- 
lent Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  is  secretary  of  that  board,  having  been 
elected  for  a  five  years'  term  at  the  Denver  meeting  in  July,  191 3.  In 
politics  he  is  a  republican  and  has  taken  an  active  interest  in  the  affairs  of  state 
and  nation.  He  is  a  junior  warden  of  St.  Mark's  Episcopal  church,  having  been 
thus  officially  connected  with  the  church  for  a  long  period.  It  will  thus  be  seen 
that  there  is  no  important  element  in  the  life  of  the  city  with  which  he  is  not 
associated  in  a  helpful  manner.  Business  enterprise,  civic  welfare  and  moral 
progress  have  all  been  promoted  by  him.  He  certainly  deserves  much  credit  for 
what  he  has  accomplished  along  business  hues,  for  through  his  persistent,  earnest 
and  indefatigable  efforts  he  has  advanced  to  a  leading  position  among  the  citi- 
zens of  Waterloo. 


WILLIAM  H.  BEDEORD. 

William  H.  Bedford  is  a  leading  factor  in  real-estate  circles  of  Cedar  Falls, 
handling  his  own  property.  He  now  has  a  good  clientage  and  his  business  has 
reached  extensive  proportions.  He  was  born  in  Lincoln  township,  this  county, 
while  his  parents,  Daniel  and  Martha  (Whitely)  Bedford,  were  natives  of 
Pennsylvania.  The  father  made  farming  his  life  work  and  in  the  year  1869 
arrived  in  Iowa,  at  which  time  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Lincoln  township.  Black 
Hawk  county.  Fie  became  a  landowner  and  with  the  exception  of  a  brief  period 
of  a  few  months  spent  his  remaining  days  in  this  county.  He  became  interested 
in  a  creamery  business,  was  engaged  in  stock-raising  and  in  other  business  affairs, 
all  of  which  contributed  to  his  growing  success.  He  died  in  May,  1898,  while 
his  wife,  who  still  survives,  is  a  resident  of  Waterloo. 

William  H.  Bedford  was  the  fifth  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  seven 
children.  The  family  record  is  as  follows:  Clara  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  Vandervere, 
of  Cedar  Falls.  Josephine  is  the  wife  of  T.  F.  Glenny,  of  Waterloo.  Carleton 
W.  is  a  resident  of  Fludson,  where  he  is  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank. 
Lyman  D.  is  cashier  of  the  First  State  Bank  of  Corona,  California.  William  H. 
is  the  next  of  the  family.  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  Lloyd  Loonan,  a  farmer  resid- 
ing at  Hudson,  Iowa.     Helen  is  deceased. 

William  H.  Bedford  attended  school  in  Hudson,  Iowa,  and  also  the  State 
Teachers  College  at  Cedar  Falls.  Upon  attaining  his  rnajority  he  accepted  a 
position  in  a  bank  at  Adrian,  Minnesota,  where  he  acted  first  as  bookkeeper  and 


254  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

afterward  as  assistant  cashier  for  four  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period 
he  went  to  Cedar  Falls  and  was  associated  with  the  Cedar  Falls  National  Bank 
for  six  and  one-half  years  in  the  capacity  of  assistant  cashier.  Since  that  time 
he  has  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business,  buying  and  selling  farms  and  resi- 
dence properties  which  he  has  improved  and  placed  upon  the  market.  From 
his  activities  in  this  field  he  has  derived  a  very  substantial  income  and  he  has 
as  a  partner  in  the  undertaking  George  C  Frisbee,  with  whom  he  is  associated 
in  handling  farm  lands.  Mr.  Bedford  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Weart-Frisbee 
Lumber  Company. 

On  the  22d  of  August,  1908,  Mr.  Bedford  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Besse  Simpson,  who  was  born  near  Janesville,  Bremer  county,  Iowa,  a  daugh- 
ter of  John  and  Margaret  Simpson,  who  were  also  natives  of  Bremer  county. 
The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  devoted  many  years  to  that  pursuit 
but  is  now  living  retired  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  and  his  wife  occupy  a  pleas- 
ant home. 

Mr.  Bedford  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views  but  has  never  sought  nor 
desired  public  office.  His  moral  progress  has  had  its  root  in  his  membership 
in  the  Presbyterian  church  and  he  has  also  exemplified  in  his  life  the  teachings 
and  spirit  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  which  is  based  upon  the  brotherhood  of 
man.  He  likewise  has  membership  in  the  Elks  lodge  of  Waterloo  and  he  is 
prominent  and  popular  in  these  different  organizations,  enjoying  the  warm 
regard,  confidence  and  goodwill  of  his  brethren  of  these  fraternities. 


D.  SANDS  WRIGHT,  A.  M. 

V 

One  of  the  most  potent  factors  in  the  success  of  the  Iowa  State  Teachers 
College,  originally  the  Iowa  State  Normal  School,  has  been  the  professional  work 
and  personal  influence  of  Professor  D.  Sands  Wright.  He  was  born  on  a  farm 
near  New  London,  Highland  county,  Ohio,  on  the  7th  of  December,  1847.  His 
father,  Joseph  Wright,  was  a  prominent  and  eloquent  rtiinister  in  the  Society  of 
Friends  and  his  mother,  Lydia  (Cowgill)  Wright,  was  a  lifelong  member  of  the 
same  communion.  True  to  his  home  training,  Professor  Wright  has  been  through- 
out life  a  member  and  since  1886  a  minister  in  the  Quaker  church.  He  enjoyed 
in  youth  the  usual  educational  advantages  of  a  farmer's  son,  spending  the  winter 
months  in  the  country  school  and  the  remainder  of  the  year  at  hard  labor  on 
the  farm. 

As  he  approached  young  manhood  he  was  possessed  of  an  ardent  desire  to 
acquire  a  thorough  literary  education  and  partly  by  teaching  and  partly  upon 
borrowed  money  he  was  enabled  in  1871  to  complete  a  classical  course  of  instruc- 
tion, receiving  upon  graduation  the  degree  of  A.  B.,  and  three  years  later  the 
honorary  degree  of  A.  M.,  and  in  1887  he  was  given  the  honorary  degree  of 
A.  M.  by  Penn  College.  He  received  private  undergraduate  instruction  from 
Dr!  Lewis  McKibben  at  Hillsboro,  Ohio,  and  he  also  took  post-graduate  work 
under  Dr.  Phillips  in  civil  engineering  at  Armour  Institute,  Chicago. 

Professor  Wright  began  his  career  as  a  teacher  in  the  country  schools  of 
Highland  and  Clinton  counties,  Ohio.     In   1872  he  was  elected  to  the  position 


D.  SANDS  WEIGHT 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  257 

of   associate   president   of    Whittier   College,   located   at   Salem,   Henry   county, 
Iowa,  and  in   1874  his  associate.  Professor  C.  C.   Pickett,  having  resigned,  he 
was  chosen  president  of  the  institution  by  its  board  of  directors.     Two  years 
later  the  Iowa  State  Normal   School  was  established  by  the  legislature  of  the 
state  and  he  was  called  by  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  new  institution  to  the 
chair  of  English  language  and  literature.     He  has  therefore  been  connected  with 
the  school  at  Cedar  Falls  since  its  origin  in  1876.     He  was  transferred  in  1881 
from  the  chair  of  English  to  that  of  mathematics,  which  position  he  has  filled 
for   over   a   third   of    a   century.      Since    1875    he   has   been    a    prominent   and 
active  member  of  the  Iowa   State  Teachers  Association,  has  served   for  many 
years    as    a    member    of    its    educational    council    and    as    a    member    of    its 
important  committees  has  been  a  power  in  the  shaping  and  directing  of   its 
policies.      In    1904  he   served  as  president  of   the   association.      In   educational 
circles  in  Iowa  he  is  widely  known  in  many  capacities.     He  has  appeared  in  all 
parts  of  the  state  as  a  conductor  of  teachers'  institutes  and  as  an  institute  lecturer. 
He  is  always  at  home  with  a  class  of  teachers  and  his  didactic  talks  and  lectures 
are  familiar,  practical  and  entertaining.     He  treats  his  hearers  to  no  fine-spun 
and  untried  theories  but  to  conclusions  and  inferences  largely  drawn  from  his 
own  experience  in  the  difl'erent  grades  of  public-school  work,  while  there  is  a 
(|uiet  vein  of  humor  in  his  addresses,  which  take  a  decidedly  sarcastic  turn  when 
he  is  exposing  the  shams  and  follies  of  educational  quacks  and  pretenders. 

He  is  also  well  known  on  the  popular  lecture  platform.  He  visited  Europe 
in  the  '80s  and  on  his  return  delighted  many  audiences  by  his  lecture  on  What 
1  Saw  in  Europe.  Among  his  other  lecture  titles  are  The  Coming  Woman,  Ideals, 
Personality,  Lincoln,  the  Man  of  Fortune,  Complete  Education  and  the  Rights 
of  the  Child.  He  has  also  given  a  great  number  of  high  school  commencement 
addresses  and  high  school  baccalaureate  sermons. 

Professor  Wright  has  written  much  for  educational  magazines,  his  articles 
published  in  the  Iowa  Normal  Monthly  alone  numbering  one  hundred  and  forty- 
four.     His  first  contributions  to  that  journal  were  a  series  of  twelve  ironical 
educational  articles,  entitled  The  Scroggs  Family,  and  were  written  under  the 
nom  de  plume  of  Thephilus  Von  Puft".     Many  of  his  articles  for  the  Monthly 
appeared  in  series,  under  such  general  titles  as  Lessons  not  Taught  in  the  Books, 
Words,   Reading,   Arithmetic  and   Pedagog's   Progress.     Of   the   single  articles 
may  be  mentioned  as  notable:     Frank  Davis;  A.  Jackson  Smythe;  Jug  Town 
Academy;  and  As  Our  Pupils  See  Us.     These  Normal  Monthly  articles  have 
been  extensively  quoted  and  reproduced  in  other  educational  journals  and  some 
have  been  collected  and  published  in  book  form.     He  is  also  the  author  of  hand- 
books for  teachers,  which  have  had  an  extensive  sale.     The  best  known  of  these 
is  his  Exercises  in  Concrete  Geometry,  which  is  published  by  the  well  known 
house  of  D.  C.  Heath  &  Company,  Boston,  and  was  prepared  for  them  at  their 
request.     The  work  is  made  up  chiefly  from  the  author's  classroom  notes  and 
embodies  the  results  of  a  lifetime's  experience  in  teaching  geometry  in  a  state 
teachers'  college.     As  a  text-book  it  is  unique  in  that  it  is  based  on  the  doctrine 
that  theory  should  immediately  precede  practice;  that  when  a  principle  is  once 
learned  by  a  pupil  exercises  should  be  at  hand  for  its  application.     Its  purpose 
is  to  obviate  the  criticism  often  justly  made  against  geometrical  study,  that  the 
student  in  the  subject  may  be  able  to  state  all  the  whys  and  wherefores  of  a 


Vol.  11—14 


258  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

demonstration  in  the  best  logical  form  and  yet  be  utterly  helpless  to  apply  the 
principle  so  acquired  to  the  solution  of  simple  arithmetical  problems. 

On  the  24th  of  July,  1880,  Professor  Wright  was  married  to  Miss  Eliza 
Rawstern,  on  the  day  of  her  graduation  from  the  Iowa  State  Normal  School. 
To  the  union  four  children  were  born,  a  son  and  three  daughters.  The  son, 
Joseph,  distinguished  himself  as  a  student  and  on  the  athletic  field,  winning  in 
the  last  year  of  his  course  in  the  Teachers  College  a  place  on  the  all-Iowa  foot- 
ball eleven.  Later  he  pursued  a  course  of  training  in  the  Young  Men's  Christian 
Association  Training  School  at  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  and  upon  graduating 
from  this  institution  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  athletic  department  of  the 
Francis  Parker  Training  School,  Chicago,  which  position  he  has  continued  to 
fill  for  many  years.  Of  the  daughters,  Luella  is  teaching  Latin  in  the  high  school 
of  North  Yakima,  Washington.  May  Wright  Ratclifife  is  the  wife  of  William 
Ratcliffe,  a  prominent  lawyer  of  Red  Oak,  Iowa.  Ruth,  the  youngest,  is  pro- 
fessor of  voice  and  physical  training  in  Yankton  College,  Yankton,  South  Dakota. 
The  children  are  all  alumni  of  the  Iowa  State  Teachers  College  and  the  two 
elder  daughters  are  also  graduates  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa. 

At  the  191 2  commencement  of  the  Teachers  College,  Professor  Wright  was 
recognized  by  a  banquet  given  in  his  honor  by  the  alumni.  Two  of  the  leading 
speakers  on  this  occasion  were  Hon.  E.  D.  Chassell,  of  Le  Mars,  and  Hon.  Rollo 
Patterson,  of  New  York  city.  The  quotation  below  is  from  the  address  of 
Mr.  Chassell : 

"Graduates  go  forth  at  each  commencement,  all  owing  a  debt  they  can  never 
repay  to  Professor  D.  Sands  Wright;  a  debt  which  makes  them  better  and 
kindlier  and  stronger  men  and  women.  It  is  the  misfortune  of  many  men  to 
appear  upon  the  world's  stage  at  the  wrong  time,  but  here  is  a  man  who  was 
staged  at  the  right  time.  His  achievements  and  his  talents  have  done  their  good 
work  at  a  fortunate  epoch.  It  has  not  been  his  to  paint  a  picture.  It  has  not 
been  his  to  build  a  railroad.  It  has  not  been  his  to  discover  a  planet.  We  honor 
him  for  greater  things.  In  this  the  world's  greatest  period  of  achievement  he 
has  been  the  inspiration  animating  unknown  hundreds  in  every  field  of  human 
activity.  His  work  has  increased  forty  times  forty  fold.  He  has  been  a  builder 
of  character.  Lie  has  been  a  builder  of  men  and  women.  No  captain  of  industry 
and  no  general  of  military  armies  is  so  great  a  master  and  none  other  merits  so 
great  a  reward.  Neither  war,  famine  nor  pestilence  can  destroy  his  treasures, 
and  commercial  disasters  cannot  impair  his  securities." 


W.  H.  HANNA. 


W.  H.  Hanna,  president  of  the  Western  Farmers  Land  Company,  with 
offices  in  the  Marsh-Place  building  in  Waterloo,  is  a  prominent  figure  in  real- 
estate  circles,  his  intelligently  directed  activity  and  enterprise  placing  him  among 
the  leaders  in  this  line.  His  life  record  had  its  beginning  in  Benton  county  on 
the  loth  of  May,  1859,  ^^^  parents  being  A.  H.  and  Rose  Anna  Hanna,  who  came 
to  Iowa  in  1857  from  Stark  county,  Ohio,  which  was  their  birthplace.  They 
took  up  their  abode  in  Benton  county  and  the  father  there  owned  and  operated 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  259 

a  farm.  He  purchased  his  first  land  from  the  government  and  as  time  passed 
added  to  his  original  holdings  until  he  became  the  owner  of  a  valuable  farm. 
For  many  years  he  carefully  and  systematically  tilled  his  fields  and  when  he  had 
acquired  a  handsome  competence  he  retired  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Benton, 
where  he  lived  for  twenty-two  years  prior  to  his  death.  In  politics  he  was  an 
active  republican,  giving  earnest  and  intelligent  support  to  the  party  and  its 
principles,  believing  that  its  platform  contained  the  best  elements  of  good  gov- 
ernment. In  his  family  were  five  children :  Belle ;  John,  who  owns,  occupies 
and  cultivates  the  old  homestead  farm  formerly  the  property  of  his  father; 
W.  H.,  of  this  review;  James;  and  Howard. 

The  youthful  experiences  of  W.  H.  Hanna  were  those  which  usually  fall 
to  the  lot  of  the  farm  lad.  He  was  reared  in  Benton  county  and  acquired  his 
education  in  the  common  schools.  From  an  early  age  he  displayed  notable 
business  ability  and  keen  discernment  and  when  he  was  but  twenty-six  years  of 
age  he  had  charge  of  a  farm  of  seven  hundred  acres,  which  he  operated  in  con- 
nection with  the  conduct  of  an  extensive  live-stock  business.  He  handled  stock 
in  such  numbers  that  he  fed  all  of  the  grain  wdiich  he  raised  and  also  purchased 
fifteen  thousand  bushels  annually  to  add  to  that  which  he  had  raised. 

Mr.  Hanna  continued  his  active  connection  with  farming  interests  until 
191 1.  On  the  1st  of  January  of  that  year  the  Western  Farmers  Land  Company 
was  organized  and  capitalized  for  five  million  five  hundred  thousand  dollars, 
with  W.  H.  Hanna  as  president;  J.  Y.  Campbell,  vice  president;  C.  F.  Robe, 
secretary ;  and  R.  W.  Gibson,  treasurer.  In  the  company  are  more  than  five 
hundred  stockholders,  living  in  various  sections  of  the  United  States  and  Canada, 
and  they  are  principally  farmers.  The  business  has  been  placed  upon  a  profitable 
basis.  They  conduct  a  general  land  business,  buying  and  selling  and  trafficking 
in  lands  in  this  country  and  across  the  border  in  Canada.  This  is  known  as 
the  strongest,  the  largest  and  the  most  reliable  real-estate  firm  in  Iowa.  The 
policy  instituted  is  largely  the  result  of  the  enterprise,  insight  and  splendid  busi- 
ness methods  of  Mr.  Hanna,  who  recognized  the  opportunities  along  this  line 
and  has  so  directed  his  efforts  that  he  has  not  only  derived  personal  benefit  but 
has  also  made  the  company  a  profitable  concern.  His  worth  is  widely  acknowl- 
edged and  his  power  conceded  by  all  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact. 
He  is  both  forceful  and  resourceful  and  aside  from  his  connection  with  the 
Western  Farmers  Land  Company  he  has  many  business  interests,  being  a  director 
of  the  Peoples  Savings  Bank  of  Vinton ;  of  the  Farmers  Savings  Bank  of  Gar- 
rison ;  a  director  of  the  Greeley  State  Bank  at  Golsey,  Nebraska ;  a  director  in 
the  Benton  County  Agricultural  Society;  a  stockholder  in  the  Garrison  Grain 
&  Lumber  Company  of  Garrison,  Iowa;  president  of  the  Farmers  Mercantile 
Store  of  Garrison,  Iowa;  and  an  equal  owner  with  E.  D.  Bergen  in  the  Oakridge 
Stock  Farm,  which  comprises  seven  hundred  acres. 

Mr.  Hanna  is  a  man  of  marked  determination  and  carries  forward  to  suc- 
cessful completion  whatever  he  undertakes.  His  judgment  is  sound,  his  dis- 
crimination keen  and  his  energy  is  unfaltering.  He  seems  to  readily  recognize 
the  full  possibilities  of  any  business  situation  and  he  is  able  to  coordinate  appar- 
ently diverse  elements  into  a  unified  and  harmonious  whole. 

In  1883  Mr.  Hanna  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Rachel  Bergen,  a  native 
of  Benton  county,  Iowa,  and  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.   Isaac  Bergen,  who 


260  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

were  pioneers  of  that  county.  They  came  from  Indiana  and  the  father  followed 
farming  in  this  state  until  his  retirement  from  active  business  life.  They  had 
a  family  of  five  children,  Joseph,  ]Mrs.  Hanna,  Martha,  Dunning  and  Guy.  To 
our  subject  and  wife  have  been  born  three  children:  Harry,  deceased;  Roberta; 
and  Belle. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hanna  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  Mr.  Hanna's 
grandfather  was  a  preacher  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  three  of  his  nine 
sons  became  preachers,  while  all  nine  have  served  as  elders  in  the  church.  Mr. 
Hanna  is  likewise  connected  with  the  church  in  the  same  capacity  and  has  done 
effective  and  earnest  work  to  further  its  interests  and  welfare.  His  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  which  elected  him  to  represent  the 
district  in  the  thirty-second  general  assembly.  He  studies  political  questions 
with  the  same  thoroughness  and  accuracy  which  he  displayed  in  mastering  busi- 
ness problems  and  at  all  times  manifests  a  public-spirited  devotion  to  the  gen- 
eral good.  His  business  career  is  a  notably  successful  one  and  at  every  point 
thoroughly  commendable.  He  has  at  all  times  been  actuated  by  a  spirit  of 
advancement,  yet  he  has  never  been  known  to  take  advantage  of  the  necessities 
of  his  fellowmen  in  any  business  transaction.  He  has  ever  realized  that  honesty 
is  the  best  policy  and  he  has  employed  constructive  methods  in  the  conduct  of 
his  interests. 


MARK  T.  HU.MPHREY. 

Mark  T.  Humphrey  is  conducting  a  growing  and  profitable  business  as  a 
dealer  in  electrical  supplies,  motors,  lamps  and  fixtures  and  he  also  takes  con- 
tracts for  installing  electric  light  systems  in  farm  houses  and  in  small  towns. 
An  analyzation  of  his  life  record  shows  that  industry,  close  application,  persever- 
ance and  a  commendable  ambition  have  been  the  chief  elements  in  his  growing 
success.  He  is  one  of  Black  Hawk  county's  native  sons,  his  birth  having  occurred 
in  Eagle  Center,  Eagle  township,  December  22,  1886.  His  parents  were  Thomas 
J.  and  Olive  (Roberts)   Humphrey. 

The  father  was  born  in  the  state  of  Xew  York  and  devoted  his  life  to  farm- 
ing. He  came  to  Iowa  in  the  spring  of  1864,  settling  near  Eagle  Center,  where 
he  purchased  land,  paying  three  dollars  per  acre  for  his  first  eighty  acre  tract. 
He  added  to  this  from  time  to  time  as  his  financial  resources  increased  and 
brought  his  place  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  His  methods  of  farming  were 
at  all  times  practical  and  progressive  and  he  won  a  substantial  measure  of  suc- 
cess. He  continued  to  reside  upon  the  farm  until  the  fall  of  1901.  when  he. 
moved  to  \\'aterloo  and  retired  from  active  business,  spending  his  remaining 
days  in  the  enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest.  He  was  secretary  of  the  Eagle  Center 
Dairy  Association  and  his  influence  was  always  on  the  side  of  progress  and 
improvement  as  related  to  the  various  phases  of  agricultural  life.  He  was  a 
stockholder  and  the  treasurer  of  the  Black  Hawk  County  Farmers  Mutual  Fire 
and  Lightning  Insurance  Association.  He  was  always  interested  in  pubhc 
afi^airs  and  several  times  was  called  to  office.  He  served  as  a  trustee  of  his, 
township  and  was  a  member  of  the  board  of  supervisors  when  the  Fourth  Street 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  261 

bridge  was  built  and  also  when  the  site  for  the  present  courthouse  was  pur- 
chased. His  life  was  one  of  continuous  activity  and  was  a  useful  element  in 
the  county's  progress  and  improvement  along  various  lines.  He  enjoyed  the 
respect  and  good-will  of  all  who  knew  him  and  his  death,  which  occurred  in 
November,  1905,  was  deeply  regretted.  His  wife,  who  was  born  December  20, 
1855,  is  still  living  in  Waterloo,  her  residence  being  at  No.  612  Grant  avenue. 
They  were  the  parents  of  two  children,  the  elder  being  a  daughter,  Maude,  who 
is  now  the  wife  of  Aaron  Palmer,  who  resides  in  Marshalltown,  being  the  pres- 
ent superintendent  of  schools  there,  in  which  capacity  he  is  serving  for  the 
eighth  year. 

The  son,  Mark  T.  Humphrey,  was  a  pupil  in  the  country  schools  and  in  the 
Waterloo  high  school,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1905. 
He  afterward  studied  in  the  electrical  engineering  department  in  the  Iowa  State 
College  of  Agriculture  and  Mechanic  Arts  at  /\mes,  completing  his  course  in 
1909.  He  resided  at  home  and  from  choice,  while  at  school,  he  put  in  his  vaca- 
tions doing  wiring  and  other  work  preparatory  to  following  the  business  in 
which  he  is  now  engaged.  He  thus  obtained  valuable  experience  and  continued 
in  this  way  until  he  started  in  business  on  his  own  account,  on  the  i8th  of  July, 
1909,  when  he  formed  a  partnership  with  C.  W.  Hitchcock.  They  established 
the  present  business  under  the  style  of  Hitchcock  &  Humphrey,  starting  in  a 
small  way  m  a  second  floor  room  at  No.  400I/.  West  Fifth  street.  There  they 
remained  for  about  eighteen  months,  when  they  came  to  their  present  location, 
and  after  about  a  year  they  bought  out  the  Iowa  Electrical  Machinery  Company 
and  have  since  conducted  the  two  enterprises.  They  carry  a  full  line  of  electrical 
supplies,  motors,  lamps,  fixtures,  etc.,  and  in  addition  they  install  electrical 
lighting  systems  upon  farms  and  in  small  towns.  They  do  a  jobbing  and  retail 
business  and  have  gained  a  liberal  patronage.  In  addition  to  his  business  affairs 
Mr.  liumphrey  is  the  owner  of  residence  property  in  Waterloo. 

Mr.  Humphrey  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  republican  party.  He  keeps  well  informed  on  the  questions 
and  issues  of  the  day  and  is  ever  ready  to  support  his  position  by  intelligent 
argument.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Baptist  church  since  1901  and  he 
holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  is  well  known  in  the  county 
where  his  entire  life  has  been  passed  and  that  many  of  his  warmest  friends  are 
those  who  have  known  him  from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  is  an  indication 
that  his  career  has  ever  been  an  honorable  and  upright  one. 


LOUIS  W.  WITRY. 


Louis  W.  Witry  is  the  vice  president  and  factory  manager  of  the  Waterloo 
Gas  Engine  Company,  in  which  connection  he  has  the  supervision  of  the 
labors  of  seven  hundred  employes.  He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose, 
carrying  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes,  and  his  life 
work  has  been  of  a  character  that  has  contributed  to  public  prosperity  as  well  as 
to  individual  success. 


262  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

He  is  a  native  of  Waterloo,  born  in  1870,  his  parents  being  Dominic  and 
Margaret  (Pott)  Witry,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germany.  The  father 
was  born  in  1841  and  came  to  Waterloo  in  1868.  He  entered  the  employ  ot 
Henry  Daniels  in  the  only  sawmill  of  the  town  and  in  that  connection  engaged 
in  the  manufacture  of  furniture,  for  he  was  a  cabinet-maker  by  trade.  It  was 
soon  after  his  arrival  in  Waterloo  that  he  wedded  Margaret  Pott  and  they  became 
parents  of  three  children ;  Louis  W\ ;  Perrie  J.,  who  has  always  lived  in  Waterloo ; 
and  Mary,  also  of  this  city. 

Louis  W.  Witry  was  educated  in  Our  Lady  of  Victory  Sisters'  school  in 
Waterloo  and  at  the  age  of  fifteen  commenced  work  at  the  machinist's  trade 
with  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad  Company,  serving  a  five  years'  apprentice- 
ship. He  was  engaged  in  locomotive  work  for  twelve  years,  working  in  a 
number  of  the  leading  shops  in  the  middle  west  and  on  the  coast  in  order  to 
gain  greater  experience.  In  August,  1897,  he  became  associated  with  the 
Waterloo  Gas  Engine  Company,  which  was  then  occupying  the  old  building 
located  on  the  river  and  employed  twenty  men.  The  following  January  he  was 
made  superintendent  of  the  factory  and  a  little  later  he  became  a  stockholder 
in  the  company  and  was  elected  to  the  office  of  vice  president  and  factory  man- 
ager. Something  of  the  growlh  of  the  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that 
they  now  employ  on  an  average  of  seven  hundred  workmen,  many  of  whom  are 
most  skilled  and  efficient  in  their  particular  line.  Mr.  Witry  designed  the 
Waterloo  Gasoline  Engine,  which  was  far  superior  to  anything  that  had  been 
put  upon  the  market  at  that  time,  and  it  gave  such  uniform  satisfaction  that 
it  was  necessary  to  immediately  arrange  for  a  larger  factory  in  order  to  supply 
the  demand.  This  was  the  starting  point  of  the  great  plant  which  they  have 
today,  a  plant  that  covers  many  acres  and  utilizes  a  number  of  buildings,  the 
largest  of  which  is  one  thousand  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet.  There  are 
two  other  buildings  one  fifty  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet,  another  three  hun- 
dred by  one  hundred  and  forty  feet,  with  a  foundry  one  hundred  by  six  hundred 
feet.  Theirs  is  one  of  the  most  popular  engines  on  the  market  and  in  the  great 
factory  the  hum  of  industry  is  continuously  heard,  for  the  work  is  carried  steadily 
forward  in  order  to  furnish  the  supply  that  is  demanded  in  all  parts  of  the  world. 
Their  trade  not  only  covers  America,  but  many  foreign  countries,  this  being 
indicative  of  the  superiority  of  their  engine  over  many  others  upon  the  market. 
In  this  factory  was  built  the  first  automobile  ever  constructed  or  used  in  Black 
Hawk  county  and  the  design  was  by  Mr.  Witry.  They  continued  the  manufac- 
ture of  automobiles  for  some  time  but  on  account  of  the  rapid  increase  in  the 
demand  for  gasoline  engines  had  to  abandon  the  former  for  lack  of  room. 

Mr.  Witry  is  an  extensive  property  holder  of  Waterloo  and  now  occupies 
the  old  homestead  with  his  mother  and  sister,  his  father  having  died  in  1912. 
He  is  a  member  of  St.  Joseph's  Catholic  church  and  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus, 
and  he  also  has  membership  with  the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles,  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Waterloo  Club  and 
Waterloo  Business  and  Traveling  Men's  Association.  His  has  indeed  been  a 
busy,  useful  and  active  life,  resulting  in  continuous  advancement.  Following 
out  the  bent  of  his  nature  he  soon  reached  an  expert  position  in  connection  with 
mechanics  and  his  initiative  spirit  has  led  to  inventions  that  have  been  of  the 
utmost  value  and  worth.    A  man  of  great  natural  ability,  his  success  in  business 


LOUIS  W.  WITt?Y 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  263 

has  been  uniform  and  rapid.  As  has  been  truly  remarked,  after  all  that  may 
be  done  for  a  man  in  the  way  of  giving  him  early  opportunities  for  obtaining 
the  requirements  which  are  sought  in  the  schools  and  in  books,  he  must  essen- 
tially formulate,  determine  and  give  shape  to  his  own  character  and  this  is 
what  Mr.  Witry  has  done. 


W.  K.  VOORHEES. 


W.  K.  Voorhees,  one  of  the  foremost  business  men  and  popular  young  citi- 
zens of  Cedar  Falls,  has  since  1910  served  as  secretary  and  general  manager 
of  the  Standard  Manufacturing  Company  of  the  city,  which  concern  is  engaged 
in  the  manufacture  of  steel  gates  and  conducts  one  of  the  important  industrial 
plants  of  Black  Hawk  county.  His  birth  occurred  in  Mahaska  county,  Iowa, 
near  the  town  of  Pella,  on  the  25th  of  August,  1887,  his  parents  being  John  K. 
and  Algenette  (Ryan)  Voorhees,  likewise  natives  of  this  state.  John  K.  Voor- 
hees, Sr.,  the  paternal  grandfather,  came  to  Iowa  from  Ohio  in  1845  and  at  that 
early  day  located  on  a  farm  in  Mahaska  county,  spending  the  remainder  of  his 
life  thereon.  It  was  there  that  the  birth  of  his  son  occurred.  For  about  twenty 
years  John  K.  Voorhees,  Jr.,  has  been  a  commercial  salesman,  now  representing 
the  Gale  Manufacturing  Company  of  Albion,  Michigan,  manufacturers  of  farm 
machinery.  In  1904  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Cedar  Falls  and  has  here  since 
.resided. 

W.  K.  Voorhees  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  in  the  acquirement 
of  an  education  attended  the  graded  schools  and  the  Cedar  Falls  high  school, 
from  which  institution  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1906.  Soon  after 
putting  aside  his  text-books  he  secured  a  position  with  the  Iowa  Gate  Com- 
pany of  Cedar  Falls,  acting  as  office  man  for  the  concern.  He  contmued  in 
the  service  of  the  company  for  about  four  years  and  that  his  worth  and  ability 
were  recognized  by  his  employers  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  was  sent  out 
to  represent  the  firm  when  a  special  representation  was  required.  In  1910  he 
resigned  his  position  with  the  Iowa  Gate  Company  and  became  one  of  the 
leading  spirits  in  the  organization  of  the  Standard  Manufacturing  Company, 
which  was  incorporated  under  the  laws  of  Iowa  and  of  which  he  was  made 
secretary  and  manager.  The  concern  began  operations  in  the  old  paper  mill 
property,  but  the  business  developed  so  rapidly  that  larger  quarters  were  neces- 
sary and  in  19 12  a  modern  brick  building  was  erected  which  extends  through 
from  Third  to  Fourth  street,  having  a  length  of  about  two  hundred  and  sixty 
feet  and  a  width  of  eighty  feet.  In  191 3  the  company  built  an  addition  of 
seventy  by  ninety  feet  to  house  their  galvanizing  plant,  which  they  installed  at 
that  time.  The  state  factory  inspector  declares  it  the  best  equipped  and  best 
ventilated  galvanizing  plant  in  the  state  of  Iowa.  The  firm  does  all  the  galvan- 
izing for  the  Wagner  Manufacturing  Company  and  for  the  Du  Mond  Manu- 
facturing Company  as  well  as  their  own  work.  In  his  capacity  as  secretary  and 
manager  Mr.  Voorhees  has  contributed  not  a  little  to  the  continued  growth  and 
success  of  the  business,  and  he  is  widely  recognized  as  a  young  man  of  splendid 
executive  ability  and  enterprise. 


264  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

In  1909  Air.  \'oorhees  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Julia  C.  Philpot,  of 
Cedar  Falls,  by  whom  he  has  one  son,  Maynard  K.  Fraternally  he  is  identified 
with  the  following  organizations :  Black  Hawk  Lodge,  No.  65,  A.  F.  &  A.  M., 
in  which  he  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees;  Valley  Chapter,  No.  20, 
R.  A.  M. ;  Baldwin  Commandery,  No.  11,  K.  T. ;  Crescent  Council,  No.  16, 
R.  &  S.  M.,  of  Waterloo ;  and  El  Kahir  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.  Mr.  Voor- 
hees  is  also  a  well  known  member  of  the  Cedar  Falls  Commercial  Club  and  has 
already  attained  a  position  in  business  circles  of  his  city  that  many  a  man  of 
twice  his  years  might  well  envy. 


J.  F.  CASS. 


J.  F'.  Cass  is  the  vice  president  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern 
Railroad  but  this  is  only  one  phase  of  his  activity,  as  he  has  been  identified  with 
various  plans,  projects  and  measures  which  have  been  an  element  in  promoting 
the  material,  intellectual,  political  and  moral  progress  of  his  community.  A 
native  of  Wisconsin,  he  came  to  Iowa  with  his  parents  when  three  years  of  age 
and  was  reared  in  Sumner,  his  education  being  acquired  in  the  public  schools. 
When  a  young  man  he  went  to  Chicago  and  for  five  years  was  with  the  First 
National  Bank,  starting  as  messenger  and  becoming  assistant  to  E.  K.  P)oisot, 
then  manager  of  the  bond  department  and  foreign  coin  teller. 

Mr.  Cass  afterward  engaged  in  the  banking  business  in  Sumner,  Iowa,  with- 
liis  father,  conducting  a  private  bank.  Subsequently  he  organized  the  bank  at 
Tripoli  and  at  Denver,  Iowa,  and  with  his  partners  controls  those  two  banks  and 
also  one  at  Sumner.  He  is  a  well  known  figure  in  financial  circles,  thoroughly 
conversant  with  every  phase  of  banking,  and  his  business  ability  has  been  an 
element  in  establishing  strong  financial  institutions.  He  is  also  a  director  of  the 
Commercial  National  Bank  of  Waterloo.  His  principal  interest  is  in  the  invest- 
ment and  banking  business  and  he  also  deals  largely  in  real  estate,  buying  and 
selling  lands  as  well  as  bonds  and  other  commercial  paper.  He  organized  and 
is  the  president  of  the  Iowa  Real  Estate  &  Investment  Company,  which  is 
capitalized  for  two  hundred  thousand  dollars,  all  of  which  has  been  paid  in  cash. 
He  is  likewise  financially  and  officially  connected  with  various  other  business 
enterprises  of  importance  which  have  been  factors  in  the  upbuilding  and  busi- 
ness development  of  the  state.  He  is  the  president  of  the  Cass  Farm  Company, 
which  is  the  owner  of  five  hundred  acres  of  valuable  land  in  Bremer  county  and 
of  many  thousands  of  acres  in  Black  Hawk  and  Grundy  counties.  This  com- 
pany is  winning  notable  success  in  the  development  and  conduct  of  its  Bremer 
county  farm,  which  is  a  model  property.  Thereon  they  handle  nothing  but 
blooded  stock  and  upon  the  place  have  been  produced  some  of  the  finest  cattle 
and  horses  of  the  state. 

Mr.  Cass  was  also  instrumental  in  organizing  the  Western  Electric  Telephone 
System  and  was  president  of  the  company  when  they  put  in  the  first  toll  telephone 
lines  throughout  Iowa,  Dakota,  Nebraska,  Wisconsin  and  other  points  in  the 
middle  west.  He  was  also  at  one  time  president  of  the  Kinloch  Telephone  Com- 
pany of  St.  Louis  and  of  Kansas  City  and  few  men  have  been  more  active  in 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  265 

instituting  and  developing  the  telephone  system  of  the  central  western  states. 
When  the  Western  Electric  Telephone  Company  sold  out  to  the  Bell  Telephone 
Company  they  had  nearly  six  thousand  miles  of  line  in  operation.  Mr.  Cass 
certainly  deserves  great  credit  for  organizing  the  company,  of  which  he  was  the 
president  and  the  principal  stockholder.  He  is  now  prominently,  closely  and 
actively  associated  with  the  operation  of  interurban  railways  as  the  vice  presi- 
dent of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad.  His  business  interests 
have  on  the  whole  been  of  a  character  that  have  contributed  in  large  measure 
to  public  progress  and  prosperity  as  well  as  to  individual  success. 

In  1887  Mr.  Cass  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Florence  B.  Royal  and 
they  have  one  daughter,  Hazel  M.,  now  the  wife  of  J.  C.  Koeneke,  of  Waterloo, 
and  a  son,  Ernest  Cass,  who  was  educated  in  the  public  schools,  in  the  Shattuck 
Military  School  at  Faribault,  Minnesota,  and  is  now  in  the  office  of  the  Water- 
loo, Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Company. 

Mr.  Cass  has  been  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  for  twenty-five  years 
and  he  also  has  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade  of 
Waterloo.  In  politics  he  is  a  prominent  republican  and  has  served  as  state 
chairman  of  the  republican  state  central  committee.  He  has  likewise  been  a 
member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Upper  Iowa  University  of  Fayette.  His 
interests  and  activities  have  thus  covered  a  wide  range,  having  to  do  with  the 
welfare  of  his  state  in  many  connections.  Progress  and  patriotism  might  well 
be  termed  the  keynotes  of  his  character.  He  is  a  man  of  well  balanced  mind, 
even  temper  and  conservative  habit  and  is  rich  in  the  possession  of  enterprise 
of  the  kind  that  leads  to  great  accomplishments. 


JOHN  W.  ROBERTS. 


In  the  demise  of  John  W.  Roberts,  which  occurred  at  La  Porte  City  on  the 
2d  of  June,  1911,  Black  Hawk  county  lost  one  of  its  esteemed  citizens  and  repre- 
sentative agriculturists,  for  he  had  resided  within  the  borders  of  this  county  for 
more  than  six  decades  and  had  won  gratifying  success  as  a  farmer,  owning  a 
tract  of  two  hundred  acres  in  Spring  Creek  township.  His  birth  occurred  in 
Indiana  on  the  nth  of  August,  1843,  his  parents  being  E.  O.  and  Irene  Roberts, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Wales.  They  emigrated  to  the  United  States  in 
a  very  early  day  and  located  in  Indiana,  where  they  made  their  home  until  1849, 
wlien  they  removed  to  Jones  county,  Iowa.  The  following  year,  however,  they 
came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  settling  in  Spring  Creek  township,  where  the  father 
carried  on  agricultural  pursuits  during  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  passed 
away  January  2"],  1899,  and  his  wife  died  January  17,  1899.  They  had  lived  in 
this  county  for  almost  a  half  century  and  had  won  an  extensive  circle  of  warm 
friends  who  sincerely  mourned  their  loss. 

John  W.  Roberts,  but  a  very  young  lad  when  brought  to  Black  Hawk  county 
by  his  parents,  was  reared  and  educated  in  Spring  Creek  township  and  remained 
on  the  home  farm  until  twenty-four  years  of  age.  He  then  started  out  as  an 
agriculturist  on  his  own  account,  purchasing  forty  acres  of  land  on  sections  9 
and  4,  Spring  Creek  township,  which  he  began  improving.     Prosperity  attended 


266  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

his  labors  and  as  time  passed  he  extended  the  boundaries  of  his  farm  by  addi- 
tional purchase  until  it  embraced  two  hundred  acres.  He  brought  the  place  to 
a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  improvement  and  devoted  his  attention  to  the 
active  work  of  the  fields  until  1900,  when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  La  Porte 
City,  where  he  purchased  an  attractive  residence  and  spent  the  remainder  of  his 
life  in  honorable  retirement.  His  demise  occurred  on  the  2d  of  June,  191 1,  at 
the  end  of  about  eight  years'  illness.  The  farm  of  two  hundred  acres  is  still 
in  possession  of  his  widow,  who  also  owns  a  residence  in  La  Porte  City  which 
she  leases. 

On  the  30th  of  May,  1867,  Mr.  Roberts  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Anna  M.  Sroufe,  who  was  born  in  Ohio,  July  26,  1850,  her  parents  being  Benoni 
and  Mary  Ann  (Grandoll)  Sroufe,  natives  of  Ohio.  In  1853  they  removed  to 
Buchanan  county,  Iowa,  where  the  father  successfully  carried  on  farming 
throughout  the  remainder  of  his  active  business  career.  He  enjoyed  retirement, 
however,  for  but  three  months,  passing  away  in  Brandon  at  the  end  of  that 
time — in  1902.  For  four  decades  he  had  survived  his  wife,  who  was  called  to 
her  final  rest  in  1862.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roberts  were  born  four  children,  as 
follows;  Mrs.  W.  H.  Abbott,  of  Los  Angeles,  California;  E.  O.,  of  Spring 
Creek  township,  this  county ;  J.  W.,  who  is  a  resident  of  \\'aterloo ;  and  Mrs. 
Fannie  Wells,  living  in  Hitchcock,  South  Dakota. 

Mr.  Roberts  gave  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy  and  served  as 
school  director  for  several  years,  being  ever  a  stalwart  champion  of  the  cause 
of  education.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Methodist  church  and  fra- 
ternally he  was  identified  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  His 
life  was  upright  and  honorable  in  every  relation  and  his  death  came  as  a  great 
bereavement  to  many  friends  as  well  as  to  his  immediate  family.  Mrs.  Roberts, 
still  living  in  La  Porte  City,  is  also  highly  esteemed  here,  the  circle  of  her  friends 
being  almost  coextensive  with  the  circle  of  her  acquaintances. 


FRANK  N.  MEAD,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Frank  N.  Mead  has  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  at  Cedar  Falls 
since  the  fall  of  1899  ^^^  i"  the  intervening  period  of  fifteen  years  has  made 
continuous  progress  in  his  profession.  He  was  born  in  Shellrock,  Butler  county, 
Iowa,  October  6,  1868,  and  is  a  son  of  Levi  and  Adeline  (West)  Mead,  the 
former  a  native  of  Saratoga  Springs,  New  York,  and  the  latter  of  Indiana.  The 
father  followed  farming  as  a  life  work  and  in  1867  came  to  Iowa,  settling  near 
Shell  Rock.  He  became  a  landowner  and  for  many  years  engaged  in  farming 
but  is  now  living  retired,  he  and  his  wife  making  their  home  in  Shell  Rock.  His 
business  record  is  a  creditable  and  enviable  one  but  not  more  so  than  his  record 
as  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war.  Through  four  years  and  five  months  he  was  with 
the  army  as  a  member  of  Company  B,  Eighth  Wisconsin  Volunteer  Infantry, 
known  as  the  "Live  Eagle"  Regiment  because  of  the  fact  that  they  had  with  them 
through  much  of  the  war  a  live  eagle.  Mr.  Mead  was  never  w^ounded  nor  con- 
fined in  a  hospital  through  illness  but  was  always  at  his  post,  never  faltering  in 
the  performance  of  duty,  whether  upon  the  lonely  picket  line  or  in  the  midst  of 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  267 

the  firing  line.     He  was  promoted  from  the  rank  of  corporal  to  that  of  first 
lieutenant  and  he  returned  to  his  home  with  a  most  creditable  military  record. 

Dr.  Mead  was  the  oldest  of  the  four  children  in  his  father's  family.  He 
attended  school  in  Butler  county,  Iowa,  and  also  became  a  student  in  the  State 
Normal  School  at  Cedar  Falls.  Determining  upon  the  practice  of  medicine  as 
a  life  work,  he  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Iowa  and 
afterward  continued  his  studies  in  preparation  for  his  profession  in  the  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania.  He  was  graduated  from  the  former  with  the  class  of 
1893  and  from  the  latter  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1895  ^^^  was  thus  well 
equipped  for  important  responsibilities  and  grave  professional  duties.  Before 
pursuing  his  medical  course,  however,  he  took  up  the  profession  of  school- 
teaching  in  Butler  county,  devoting  a  year  to  that  work.  Following  his  gradua- 
tion from  the  Pennsylvania  Medical  College  he  located  for  practice  at  Bristow, 
Butler  county,  Iowa,  where  he  remained  for  several  years.  He  then  came  to 
Cedar  Falls  in  September,  1899,  ^"^  has  here  followed  his  profession  contin- 
uously since.  He  continues  in  general  practice,  to  which  he  devotes  his  entire 
time,  and  he  belongs  to  the  city,  county  and  state  medical  associations.  Long 
experience  and  broad  reading  have  greatly  augmented  his  knowledge  and 
ability,  and  at  all  times  he  has  kept  in  touch  with  the  onward  trend  of  thought 
and  scientific  investigation  in  regard  to  medical  practice. 

In  December,  1898,  Dr.  Mead  was  married  to  Miss  Daisy  Seefried,  who  was 
born  in  Vienna,  Austria,  in  which  city  they  were  married  while  Dr.  Mead  was 
attending  the  University  of  Vienna.  To  them  have  been  born  three  children, 
Joseph  O.,  Bertha  Louise  and  Marion  Ruth. 

Dr.  Mead  is  prominent  in  Masonic  circles,  having  advanced  from  the  lodge 
through  the  various  degrees  of  the  York  Rite  until  he  is  a  Knight  Templar  in 
Baldwin  Commandery.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  has 
passed  through  all  of  the  chairs  of  the  chapter  and  commandery.  Laudable 
ambition  has  actuated  him  in  all  of  his  professional  activities  and  led  to  his  going 
abroad  for  further  study,  so  that  he  becam.e  familiar  with  the  advanced  methods 
of  many  eminent  physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  old  world.  His  reading,  how- 
ever, has  not  been  confined  alone  to  the  science  of  medicine  but  has  compassed 
a  broad  field,  bringing  him  in  touch  with  many  of  the  vital  and  significant  prob- 
lems of  the  day. 


J.  W.  GALLOWAY. 


J.  W.  Galloway  needs  no  introduction  to  the  readers  of  this  volume,  for  as 
vice  president  of  the  William  Galloway  Company  and  of  the  Galloway  Brothers 
Company  he  is  prominently  connected  with  the  business  interests  not  only  of 
Waterloo  and  Black  Hawk  county,  but  of  the  state.  Iowa  has  reason  to  be 
proud  to  number  him  among  her  native  sons.  His  birth  occurred  in  Tama 
county  in  1876  and  there  he  was  reared  and  educated.  His  advantages  were 
not  above  those  which  come  to  the  average  youth. 

Early  in  life  Mr.  Galloway  engaged  in  farming  and  in  fact  is  still  heavily 
interested  in  agricultural  pursuits,  for  in  connection  with  his  brother  he  is  the 


268  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

owner  of  four  sections  of  land  in  the  Saskatchewan  district  in  Canada,  which 
they  use  in  growing  seed  for  their  business  at  this  point.  Three  years  ago  the 
company  was  incorporated  as  the  Galloway  Brothers-Bowman  Company,  but  at 
the  present  time  it  is  the  Galloway  Brothers  Company.  The  capital  stock  is  five 
hundred  thousand  dollars.  The  company  deals  in  all  kinds  of  farm  and  field 
seeds,  flowers  and  shrubbery  and,  as  indicated,  their  farm  and  field  seeds  are 
cultivated  upon  their  Saskatchewan  property,  while  their  flower  seeds  are  all 
imported.  The  business  has  reached  large  and  gratifying  proportions  and  their 
shipments  cover  a  very  wide  territory,  being  sent  to  all  parts  of  the  country. 
Of  this  company  J.  W.  Galloway  is  the  vice  president  and  active  in  the  manage- 
ment of  the  business.  He  is  also  the  vice  president  of  the  William  Galloway  Com- 
pany, manufacturers  of  farm  machinery  and  implements,  in  which  connection 
they  control  one  of  the  most  extensive  and  important  industrial  concerns  of  the 
state.  Their  business  in  the  seed  line  is  a  mail  order  business  and  they  also 
take  contracts  for  landscape  gardening,  doing  considerable  work  of  that  char- 
acter throughout  the  country. 

In  1904  Mr.  Galloway  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lula  Jones,  of  Seaton, 
Illinois,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  three  children,  James  Harold,  Margaret 
Virginia  and  Roger  Maine.  Mr.  Galloway  is  a  member  of  the  United  Presby- 
terian church,  also  of  the  Commercial  Clul)  and  Hoard  of  Trade — interests  and 
activities  which  indicate  the  rules  which  govern  his  conduct  and  point  out  his 
line  of  activity  for  the  benefit  of  the  community.  He  is  a  most  energetic  man, 
resolute,  forceful  and  resourceful.  He  is  well  balanced,  physically  and  mentally, 
possesses  sufficient  courage  to  venture  where  favoring  opportunity  is  presented, 
and  his  judgment  and  even  ])aced  energy  have  carried  him  forward  to  the  goal 
of  success. 


CHARLES  S.  BICKLEY. 

Charles  S.  Bickley  is  a  real-estate  and  insurance  broker  numbered  among 
the  active  business  men  of  Waterloo,  of  which  city  he  is  a  native  son.  He  was 
born  September  26,  1878,  his  parents  being  G.  G.  and  Eliza  J.  (Blough)  Bickley, 
of  whom  mention  is  made  elsewhere  m  this  volume  in  connection  with  the  sketch 
of  their  son.  Dr.  G.  G.  Bickley. 

Charles  S.  Bickley  spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  under  the  parental 
roof  and  at  the  usual  age  began  his  education  as  a  public-school  student.  When 
he  had  completed  the  high-school  course  in  Waterloo  he  entered  the  Waterloo 
Business  College  and  after  putting  his  text-books  aside  he  was  for  a  number  of 
years  identified  with  his  father  in  the  telephone  business,  being  thus  connected 
until  the  father  disposed  of  his  interests  along  that  line.  Charles  S.  Bickley  then 
remained  with  the  father's  successors,  the  Iowa  Telephone  Company,  in  the 
capacity  of  city  foreman  and  in  other  connections  for  two  years  and  later  he 
identified  himself  with  James  Gardner  in  the  real-estate  business.  They  were 
associated  for  two  and  a  half  years  and  subsequently  Mr.  Bickley  entered  into 
business  with  Louis  Miller,  which  relation  was  maintained  for  three  years.  On 
the  ist  of  May,  19 14,  he  established  an  independent  business  with  offices  in  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  269 

Bickley  building,  which  is  a  part  of  his  father's  estate.  He  is  now  devoting  his 
attention  to  real-estate  and  insurance  brokerage  and  has  handled  much  valuable 
property.  He  is  thoroughly  versed  concerning  realty  values  and  he  knows  every 
phase  of  the  business  and  has  manifested  keen  sagacity  in  managing  and  directing 
the  affairs  under  his  control. 

In  1903  Mr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Helen  D.  Hull,  of  Chi- 
cago. Mr.  Bickley  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  republican  party  and  has  always  been  loyal  to  that  organization, 
believing  that  its  principles  contain  the  best  elements  of  good  government.  He 
belongs  to  the  Town  Criers  Club,  an  organization  formed  to  further  the  interests, 
promote  the  upbuilding  and  extend  the  business  relations  of  his  city.  He  is  ever 
loyal  to  Waterloo  and  aids  in  many  movements  which  are  directly  beneficial  to 
the  municipality.  His  entire  life  having  been  passed  in  this  city,  he  is  well 
known  and  the  sterling  traits  of  his  character  have  gained  for  him  the  high 
esteem  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact  through  both  business 
and  social  relations. 


PETERSEN  BROTHERS. 

The  firm  of  Petersen  Brothers  is  composed  of  A.  T.  and  A.  H.  Petersen, 
conducting  a  successful  business  as  funeral  directors  and  embalmers.  The  senior 
partner  of  the  firm,  A.  T.  Petersen,  was  born  at  Durant,  Iowa,  October  15,  1883, 
a  son  of  J.  W.  and  Henrietta  E.  (Friedrich)  Petersen,  the  former  a  native  of 
Hamburg,  Germany,  and  the  latter  of  Davenport,  Iowa.  The  mother,  however, 
came  of  German  parentage.  J.  W.  Petersen  arrived  in  the  United  States  in 
1853  and  first  settled  at  Durant,  Iowa.  It  was  on  the  loth  of  December,  1876, 
in  Davenport,  that  he  wedded  Miss  Friedrich,  although  she  was  a  resident  of 
Durant  at  the  time.  Mr.  Petersen  was  one  of  the  pioneer  funeral  directors  of 
the  latter  city  and  engaged  in  the  business  when  each  undertaker  made  the 
coffins  which  he  sold.  He  has  been  in  the  business  in  Durant  for  more  than 
thirty-five  years  and  is  a  well  known  and  highly  respected  citizen  there. 

A.  T.  Petersen  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  his  native  city  and  after  com- 
pleting the  high-school  course  attended  Brown's  Business  College  of  Davenport, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  both  the  bookkeeping  and  stenographic  depart- 
ments as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1907.  A.  H.  Petersen,  who  was  born  Septem- 
ber 13,  1886,  also  attended  the  public  and  high  schools  of  Durant.  The  brothers 
worked  under  their  father's  direction  from  an  early  age  and  thereby  laid  the 
foundation  for  their  later  success  in  their  chosen  field  of  labor.  They  entered 
the  Hohenschuh-Carpenter  College  of  Embalming  at  Des  Moines,  A.  H.  Petersen 
he'mg  graduated  on  the  28th  of  July,  1909,  while  A.  T.  Petersen  completed  his 
course  in  that  institution  in  July,  191 1.  The  previous  year  the  brothers  had 
come  to  Waterloo  and  established  themselves  in  business  in  commodious  quar- 
ters, their  rooms  including  a  chapel  and  a  private  morgue,  together  with  thor- 
oughly modern  show  rooms  supplied  with  glass  wall  cases.  Theirs  is  the  only 
firm  in  Waterloo  with  the  glass  wall  show  cases.     The  firm  also  owns  a  private 


270  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

motor  ambulance,  which  they  operate  in  connection  with  the  business.     This  is 
thoroughly  up-to-date,  having  all  of  the  latest  improvements. 

On  the  6th  of  June,  1910,  A.  T.  Petersen  was  married  to  Miss  Edna  C. 
Goettsch,  of  Durant.  On  the  15th  of  the  same  month  A.  H.  Petersen  wedded 
Miss  Hilda  S.  Goettsch,  a  sister  of  his  brother's  wife.  They  all  live  in  one  resi- 
dence as  one  family  at  No.  611  West  Fifth  street  and  own  their  own  home. 
The  brothers  are  members  of  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Taber- 
nacle Chapter,  No.  52,  R.  A.  M. ;  Crescent  Council,  No.  16,  R.  &  S.  M. ;  and 
Ascalon  Commandery,  No.  25,  K.  T. ;  while  A.  T.  Petersen  has  taken  the  work 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  is  a  member  of  El  Kahir  Temple,  of  Cedar  Rapids. 
He  and  his  w'lie  are  also  members  of  Waterloo  Chapter,  No.  128,  O.  E.  S..  and 
he  is  likewise  a  member  of  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P. ;  the  Tribe  of  Ben 
Hur;  and  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  328,  L.  O.  O.  M.,  of  which  he  is  the  secretary. 
His  brother  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  \\'oodmen  camp  and  both  brothers  hold 
membership  in  the  Episcopal  church,  while  A.  T.  Petersen  is  likewise  a  member 
of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  Both  are  men  of  sterling  qualities 
and  upright  character  as  well  and  business  ability  has  been  a  factor  in  estab- 
lishing them  in  the  high  regard  in  which  they  are  uniformly  held.  Since  coming 
to  Waterloo  they  have  built  up  an  enviable  and  lucrative  business  and  their  suc- 
cess is  well  merited  by  reason  of  their  honorable  methods  and  enterprise. 


S.  F.  CASS. 


No  history  of  Black  Hawk  county  would  be  complete  were  there  failure  to 
make  prominent  and  extended  reference  to  S.  F.  Cass,  whose  efforts  along 
various  lines  contributed  to  the  upbuilding,  development  and  improvement  of 
this  section  of  the  state.  Moreover,  through  his  well  directed  business  career  he 
won  the  proud  American  title  of  a  self-made  man  and  his  life  history  should 
serve  as  a  source  of  encouragement  and  inspiration  to  others,  showing  what 
may  be  accomplished  when  determination  and  energy  point  out  the  way  and 
when  industry  goes  hand  in  hand  with  integrity.  Mr.  Cass  was  born  in  Prescott 
county,  Canada,  June  31,  1839,  and  in  i860  accompanied  his  parents  to  Wis- 
consin. There,  a  year  later,  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Martha  Wilcox, 
a  native  of  New  York,  and  to  them  were  born  six  children,  of  whom  three  sons, 
J.  F.,  L.  S.  and  C.  D.  Cass,  are  now  living  and  are  numbered  among  the  prom- 
inent, influential  and  successful  business  men  of  eastern  Iowa. 

About  1864  S.  F.  Cass  left  Wisconsin  for  Ogdensburg,  New  York,  Avhere  he 
pursued  a  course  of  study  in  the  Bryant  &  Stratton  Business  College,  having 
realized  the  need  and  worth  of  such  a  training  as  a  preparation  for  the  business 
world.  Following  his  graduation  he  taught  in  that  school  for  one  term  but  in 
1865  severed  his  connection  with  the  college  and  returned  to  his  old  home  in 
Wisconsin  for  a  visit.  Soon  afterward  he  came  to  Iowa  and  took  up  his  abode 
in  Sumner  township,  Bremer  county,  where  he  purchased  five  acres  of  land. 
Subsequently  he  established  a  store  which  constituted  the  nucleus  of  a  little 
town  that  grew  up  around  it  and  was  called  Cassville.  It  had  gained  considerable 
importance  in   1875,  when  it  was  decided  to  move  Cassville  to  Sumner  in  the 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  271 

hope  that  the  railroad  would  be  built  through  the  latter  place.  The  winter  of 
1875-6,  therefore,  saw  Cassville  on  runners.  Mr.  Cass  moved  seven  buildings, 
one  of  which  was  drawn  by  a  team  of  forty  horses,  with  a  yoke  of  oxen  at- 
tached to  the  rear  to  hold  back  going  down  hill.  So  closely  interwoven  with  the 
history  of  Sumner  is  the  life  record  of  Mr.  Cass  that  it  is  impossible  to  mention 
one  without  including  the  other.  He  did  most  important  work  in  upbuilding 
and  promoting  the  interests  of  that  town  and  its  development  is  attributable  in 
no  small  measure  to  his  efforts.  For  a  number  of  years  he  spent  a  part  of  his 
time  in  Oregon,  where  he  had  large  interests. 

On  the  1st  of  January,  1881,  Mr.  Cass  established  the  Bank  of  Sumner,  of 
which  he  remained  the  president  up  to  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  also  presi- 
dent of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Grants  Pass,  Oregon,  and  was  an  able  busi- 
ness man,  carrying  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertook. 
He  recognized  and  utilized  opportunities  that  others  passed  heedlessly  by  and 
as  the  years  went  on  he  won  the  reward  of  his  labors.  He  was  indeed  a  self- 
made  man  who  by  diligence  and  honesty  gained  advancement,  and  although  he 
started  out  as  a  poor  boy,  empty-handed,  having  no  special  advantages  to  assist 
him  at  the  beginning  of  his  business  career,  he  was  at  the  time  of  his  death 
president  of  two  banks  and  held  extensive  real-estate  interests  in  Bremer  and 
adjoining  counties  and  also  in  Wisconsin  and  Oregon. 

The  attainment  of  success,  however,  was  not  the  sole  aim  and  purpose  of 
his  life,  for  he  was  a  generous  and  public-spirited  man  and  his  name  could 
always  be  found  on  any  subscription  list  to  assist  the  needy  or  promote  any 
charitable  enterprise.  When  there  was  a  plan  or  project  advanced  for  the  up- 
building of  town  or  county  he  gave  to  it  his  earnest  and  generous  support  and 
it  would  be  impossible  to  estimate  the  measure  of  his  work  and  influence  in  that 
direction.  He  judged  men  by  their  individual  merit  and  not  by  wealth  or  posi- 
tion. He  always  spoke  as  cordially  and  kindly  to  the  man  clad  in  overalls  and 
blue  jacket  as  he  did  to  the  one  in  broadcloth  and  fine  linen.  He  was  always 
generous  toward  his  employes  and  it  was  no  unusual  thing  for  him,  as  the  day 
drew  to  a  close,  to  say  at  5  :30 :  "Well,  boys,  you  have  done  well  today.  Pick 
up  your  tools  and  we  will  call  it  a  day."  The  salient  traits  of  his  character  were 
such  as  endeared  him  to  all  and  he  was  loved  and  honored  wherever  known  and 
most  of  all  where  he  was  best  known. 


HARRY  B.  BAHR. 


Harry  B.  Bahr  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  and  investment  business  at 
Waterloo,  with  offices  in  the  Marsh-Place  building.  Thoroughness  and  energy 
characterize  his  work  in  all  connections  and  have  been  the  means  of  bringing  to 
him  substantial  success  in  this  field  of  business.  He  was  born  at  La  Porte  City, 
in  Black  Hawk  county,  November  22,  1888,  a  son  of  Levi  and  Amelia  Bahr, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania.  The  mother  died  during  the  in- 
fancy of  her  son  Harry.  The  father,  who  early  learned  the  carpenter's  trade, 
became  a  contractor  and  on  his  removal  to  the  middle  west  prior  to  the  Civil 
war  settled  in  Wisconsin.     Soon  after  the  close  of  hostilities  between  the  north 


272  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  the  south  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  casting  in  his  lot  with  its  pioneer 
settlers.  He  then  began  farming  near  La  Porte  City  and  devoted  a  few  years 
to  the  work  of  tilling  the  soil  but  at  the  end  of  that  time  again  turned  his  atten- 
tion to  the  carpenter's  trade,  which  he  followed  until  his  retirement  from  active 
business  life.  He  now  lives  in  La  Porte  City  at  the  advanced  age  of  seventy- 
eight  years  and  throughout  the  entire  period  of  his  residence  in  this  county  he 
has  ever  enjoyed  the  confidence,  good-will  and  esteem  of  his  fellow  townsmen. 
His  family  numbered  six  children  :  Samuel ;  William  ;  Charles  ;  Franklin ;  Ida, 
the  wife  of  W.  A.  Lawrence;  and  Harry  B.,  of  this  review. 

The  last  named  acquired  his  education  in  La  Porte  City,  Iowa,  under  the 
direction  of  Mr.  Lizer,  mention  of  whom  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  volume. 
He  attended  the  high  school  at  Parkersburg  and  afterward  was  a  student  in  the 
Cedar  Rapids  Business  College  and  the  Waterloo  Business  College.  He  was 
graduated  from  the  College  of  Commerce  during  the  first  year  of  its  existence 
in  Waterloo.  He  was  afterward  employed  in  the  Citizens  Savings  Bank  and  in 
the  Waterloo  Loan  &  Trust  Bank,  where  he  was  the  secretary  of  the  president 
of  the  bank,  Mr.  Jamison,  for  one  year.  In  1910,  in  company  with  C.  M.  Allen, 
he  turned  his  attention  to  the  real-estate  business  but  two  years  later  dissolved 
that  partnership  and  continued  alone  as  a  real-estate  dealer,  since  which  time  he 
has  maintained  his  oftices  in  the  Marsh-Place  building.  He  makes  a  specialty 
of  investments  in  timber  lands  and  colonization  tracts,  handling  property  in  the 
northern,  southern  and  western  states.  He  owns  considerable  property  in  dif- 
ferent sections  of  the  country  and  a  good  residence  property  in  Waterloo.  His 
investments  are  judiciously  made,  for  he  has  thoroughly  informed  himself  con- 
cerning realty  values  in  the  different  districts  in  which  he  operates. 

In  igi2  Mr.  Bahr  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Eva  Christopher,  who  was 
born  at  Parkersburg,  Butler  county,  a  daughter  of  L.  P.  Christopher,  whose  wife 
died  when  their  daughter,  Mrs.  Bahr,  was  but  a  young  child.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Bahr  hold  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  gives  his  political  alle- 
giance to  the  republican  party  and  fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Knights 
of  Pythias.  lie  has  attractive  social  qualities  and  many  sterling  characteristics 
which  have  won  for  him  warm  friendship  among  those  with  whom  business  or 
social  relations  have  brought  him  in  contact. 


HON.  CHARLES  EDGAR  PICKETT. 

Hon.  Charles  Edgar  Pickett  of  Waterloo  is  a  well  known  figure  in  Iowa. 
Prominent  among  the  members  of  the  bar  of  the  state,  an  orator  of  national 
reputation,  well  known  in  business  circles  and  fraternal  organizations  and  com- 
ing from  a  strong  family,  Mr.  Pickett  ranks  among  the  distinguished  sons  of 
Black  Hawk  county.  He  was  born  in  Bonaparte,  Van  Buren  county,  Iowa, 
January  14,  1866,  a  son  of  Edgar  C.  and  Glovina  E.  (Ballard)  Pickett,  the 
former  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  the  latter  of  Indiana.  They  came  to  Iowa 
in  1863,  setthng  in  Van  Buren  county,  and  in  1872  removed  to  Black  Hawk 
county,  where  their  remaining  days  were  passed.  Edgar  C.  Pickett  responded 
to  the  country's  call  for  aid  in  1861  and  became  captain  of  Company  A,  Fiftieth 


HON,  CHAELES  E.  PICKETT 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  275 

Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  later  captain  of  Company  C,  Eighth  Iowa  Volun- 
teer Cavalry,  both  of  which  companies  he  organized.  In  1863  he  was  wounded, 
returned  home  and  later  organized  a  cavalry  company,  of  which  he  was  captain 
until  the  close  of  the  war. 

Charles  Edgar  Pickett  was  graduated  from  the  high  school  at  Waterloo 
with  the  class  of  1884.  His  literary  education  was  acquired  at  Iowa  City,  where 
he  was  graduated  in  1888  in  liberal  arts  and  from  the  law  department  of  the 
state  university  in  1890.  He  then  located  in  Waterloo  for  the  practice  of  law 
and  here  has  remained  continuously  to  the  present  time,  ranking  among  the 
foremost  members  of  the  bar.  He  has  also  been  prominently  identified  for 
many  years  with  the  business  interests  of  the  city  and  is  connected  with  many 
of  its  leading  institutions,  among  which  is  the  Leavitt  &  Johnson  National  Bank, 
of  which  he  is  vice  president,  and  the  Farmers  Loan  &  Trust  Company,  of 
which  he  is  a  director.  Being  active  in  promoting  the  progress  of  the  city,  he 
has  served  as  a  director  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  since  its  organization. 

In  politics  Mr.  Pickett  has  been  a  lifelong  republican,  having  a  place  in  the 
party's  counsels  by  inheritance,  as  Captain  Pickett  did  much  to  shape  the  early 
policies  of  republican  Iowa.  In  1899  Mr.  Pickett  was  chosen  temporary  chair- 
man of  the  republican  state  convention  and  the  papers  of  Iowa  at  once  accorded 
him  a  place  among  the  state's  great  orators.  In  the  years  following  he  cam- 
paigned in  many  of  the  northern  states  and  in  1908  was  elected  to  congress  from 
the  third  Iowa  district.  He  served  for  four  years  in  the  national  house  of 
representatives,  early  taking  his  place  among  the  forceful  men  of  that  body 
and  soon  establishing  a  reputation  as  a  resourceful  debater.  He  was  the  author 
of  the  national  conservation  bill  and  was  connected  with  other  important  con- 
structive legislation.  Among  the  speeches  which  he  made  that  attracted  wide- 
spread interest  were  those  on  the  Lincoln  Memorial,  Conservation  Bills,  Cana- 
dian Reciprocity  and  Recall  of  Judges.  As  indicated  he  is  today  an  orator  of 
nation-wide  reputation  and  he  has  on  various  occasions  delivered  addresses  in 
many  of  the  leading  cities  of  the  United  States.  He  addressed  the  Grant  Club 
of  Des  Moines  on  the  27th  of  April,  1903 ;  the  Gridley  Club  of  Ionia,  Michigan, 
on  the  29th  of  January,  1910;  the  Lincoln  Club  of  Brooklyn  on  the  12th  of 
February,  1912;  the  Union  League  Club  of  Baltimore  on  the  12th  of  February, 
1913;  and  was  the  speaker  on  the  occasion  of  the  Grant  Anniversary  at  Galena, 
Illinois,  April  27,  1914.  He  has  delivered  memorial  addresses  in  Duluth,  St. 
Paul,  Dallas,  Texas,  IndianapoHs,  Cincinnati,  Louisville,  Baltimore,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  and  many  other  cities. 

In  educational  matters  in  Iowa  Mr.  Pickett  has  taken  a  keen  interest,  having 
served  for  thirteen  years  as  regent  of  the  state  university.  In  fraternal  organ- 
izations he  has  been  active,  holding  the  position  of  grand  chancellor  of  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  of  Iowa  in  1894-5  and  grand  exalted  ruler  of  the  Benevo- 
lent Protective  Order  of  Elks  in  1901-2. 

Mr.  Pickett  was  married  June  17,  1902,  in  Louisville,  Kentucky,  to  Miss 
India  Parmley  Ryan,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  J.  R.  Ryan.  Their  children 
are  India,  Edgar  Ballard  and  Charles  Joseph.  Mr.  Pickett  attends  the  Con- 
gregational church  and  his  influence  is  always  on  the  side  of  progress,  advance- 
ment and  improvement.  The  public  has  been  either  a  direct  or  indirect  bene- 
ficiary of  his  efl:'orts  throughout  the  period  of  his  manhood.     He  has  done  much 

Vol.  11—15 


276  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

in  planmrg  for  his  city's  development  and  progress  along  business  lines  and  in 
the  iinprov£ment  of  civic  conditions.  He  now  devotes  his  attention  largely  to 
his  law  practice  in  Waterloo,  where  his  ability  has  brought  him  to  a  foremost 
rank  among  Iowa's  able  members  of  the  bar. 


CHARLES  M.  DU  MOND. 

Charles  M.  Du  Mond  is  the  president  and  manager  of  the  Du  Mond  Manu- 
facturing Company  of  Cedar  Falls,  one  of  the  important  industrial  firms  of 
Black  Flawk  county,  manufacturing  a  vacuum  washing  machine  of  his  own 
invention.  His  birth  occurred  on  a  farm  in  this  county,  his  parents  being 
Eugene  and  Maggie  E.  (Burke)  Du  Mond,  the  former  a  native  of  Ohio  and 
the  latter  of  Indiana.  Joel  Burke,  the  maternal  grandfather,  came  to  this  state 
from  Indiana  in  1868,  locating  on  a  farm  at  Finchford,  Black  Hawk  county. 
He  has  remained  a  resident  of  this  county  throughout  the  intervening  forty-six 
years  and  now  makes  his  home  in  Waterloo.  Eugene  Du  Mond  was  brought  to 
Iowa  by  his  parents  in  1861,  when  but  four  years  of  age.  His  father,  Andrew 
J.  Du  Mond,  first  located  in  Clarinda,  Page  county,  and  at  the  end  of  about  two 
years  came  to  Black  Hawk  county.  Some  time  later,  however,  he  purchased  a 
farm  just  across  the  line  in  Butler  county  and  on  this  property  he  spent  the 
remainder  of  his  life.  In  early  life  Eugene  Du  Mond  was  identified  with  farm- 
ing and  with  land  speculation,  but  in  subsequent  years  he  was  employed  as  a 
commercial  salesman,  representing  the  Rex  Stock  Food  Company  of  Omaha, 
Nebraska.  He  is  now  a  valued  representative  of  the  Du  Mond  ^Manufacturing 
Company. 

Charles  M.  Du  Mond  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  district  school  and 
subsequently  pursued  a  course  of  study  in  the  Waterloo  Business  College.  He 
then  secured  a  position  as  commercial  salesman  for  the  Parsons  music  house  of 
Waterloo  and  engaged  in  selling  pianos  for  about  two  years,  on  the  expiration 
of  which  period  he  entered  the  service  of  the  Wagner  Manufacturing  Company 
of  Cedar  Falls,  manufacturers  of  hardware  specialties.  This  firm  he  represented 
on  the  road  for  about  one  year,  subsequently  becoming  identified  with  his  father 
in  the  land  business.  In  1909  he  entered  his  present  field  of  activity  as  an  employe 
of  the  Barlow  &  Seelig  Manufacturing  Company,  manufacturers  of  washing 
machines  at  Ripon.  Wisconsin.  He  represented  this  concern  on  the  road  for 
about  four  years  and  during  that  period  thoroughly  familiarized  himself  with 
the  workings  of  the  washing  machine  and  invented  the  machine  which  he  now 
manufactures.  On  the  ist  of  May,  191 3,  he  organized  the  Du  Mond  Manu- 
facturing Company,  of  which  he  was  made  president  and  manager  and  which 
was  incorporated  under  the  laws  of  Iowa  with  a  capital  stock  of  twenty  thou- 
sand dollars.  Remarkable  success  has  attended  the  enterprise  from  its  inception 
and  the  company  is  now  shipping  its  product  into  some  twenty  different  states. 
Mr.  Du  Mond  and  his  associates  secured  as  a  factory  the  old  Monarch  self- 
feeder  plant,  a  three-story,  commodious  stone  structure.  They  manufacture 
hand-power,  gas-power  and  electric-power  machines,  and  theirs  are  among  the 
most  modern  and  efficient  machines  now  on  the  market.     Mr.  Du  Mond  recentlv 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  277 

closed  a  contract  with  an  Omaha  house  for  a  carload  of  machines  and  expects 
to  ship  the  firm  a  carload  each  month,  the  machine  having-  been  designed  by  him 
for  their  especial  trade.  It  will  thus  be  seen  that  the  business  is  constantly 
expanding  under  his  able  direction,  and  his  record  is  indeed  worthy  of  com- 
mendation, for  success  has  come  to  him  as  the  reward  of  his  own  efforts,  perse- 
verance and  ability. 

In  1906  Air.  Du  j\Iond  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bertha  McBride,  of 
Shell  Rock,  Butler  county,  Iowa,  by  whom  he  has  two  children,  Ray  and  Evelyn. 
He  belongs  to  the  Cedar  Falls  Commercial  Club  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chris- 
tian church,  which  his  wife  attends,  though  the  latter  adheres  to  the  Methodist 
belief.  They  are  highly  esteemed  throughout  the  community  and  the  hospitality 
of  the  best  homes  is  cordially  extended  them. 


HENRY  JOHNSON. 


As  president  of  the  Johnson  &  Wyth  Company  of  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  who 
conduct  a  large  hardware,  plumbing  and  heating  business,  Henry  Johnson  is  an 
important  factor  in  commercial  circles  of  that  city.  He  was  born  in  Denmark 
in  1837  and  in  1862  emigrated  to  America,  settling  in  Chicago.  In  1863  he  en- 
listed in  the  Seventy-fifth  Regiment  of  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry  for  service 
in  the  Civil  war  and  remained  with  the  regiment  until  the  conclusion  of  peace, 
being  mustered  out  at  Springfield,  Illinois,  in  1865.  He  returned  to  Chicago, 
where  he  entered  the  grocery  business,  in  which  connection  he  remained  until 
1870.  He  then  sold  out  his  interests  there  and  came  to  Cedar  Falls,  establishing 
a  grocery  store  on  Main  street  which  he  conducted  for  a  year.  After  selling 
that  store  he  located  upon  his  two  hundred  and  twenty-acre  farm  four  and  one- 
half  miles  from  Cedar  Falls  and  for  seven  years  concentrated  his  energies  upon 
farm  work.  He  then  rented  his  land  and  came  again  to  Cedar  Falls,  establishing 
a  drug  and  grocery  business  which  he  conducted  for  eighteen  years.  At  the  end 
of  that  time  he  engaged  in  the  hardware,  plumbing  and  heating  business  and 
has  since  remained  active  in  that  line.  He  is  the  executive  head  of  the  Johnson 
&  Wyth  Company  and  much  of  the  success  of  that  concern  has  been  due  to  his 
knowledge  of  business  conditions,  his  foresight  and  financial  acumen.  The 
business  of  the  company  has  grown  steadily  and  promises  to  continue  to  do  so 
as  the  goods  carried  are  of  the  highest  quality,  while  the  prices  are  reasonable. 
Mr.  Johnson  is  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Cedar  Falls  and  owns 
stock  in  a  number  of  manufacturing  concerns  of  this  city.  He  also  owns  con- 
siderable residence  property  in  Cedar  Falls  from  which  he  derives  a  gratifying 
addition  to  his  annual  income. 

Mr.  Johnson  was  married  in  Chicago,  in  1868,  to  Miss  Louisa  Frandsen,  a 
native  of  Denmark.  Of  the  children  born  to  them  three  died  in  infancy,  the 
others  being  as  follows :  Harry,  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Cedar 
Falls;  Louis,  who  is  a  partner  in  and  treasurer  of  the  Johnson  &  Wyth  Com- 
pany; Nettie,  a  graduate  of  the  Cedar  Falls  high  school,  who  is  bookkeeper  and 
stenographer  for  that  company ;  Josie,  the  wife  of  W.  A.  Waterman,  a  resident 
of  Rockford,  Illinois ;  and  Eva,  who  died  when  nineteen  years  of  age. 


278  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

Mr.  Johnson  is  independent  in  his  poHtical  views  and  was  for  thirteen  years 
a  member  of  the  school  board.  His  family  belong  to  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
church  and  are  helpful  in  its  work.  He  is  a  Knights  Templar  Mason  and  also 
belongs  to  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen  and  the  Danish  Brotherhood 
of  America.  He  has  never  regretted  coming  to  this  country  as  he  has  risen  to 
a  position  of  prominence  through  utilizing  the  opportunities  that  he  found  here. 
He  is  thoroughly  American  in  spirit  and  is  one  of  the  valued  citizens  of  his 
adopted  city. 


W.  O.  FOSTER. 


W.  O.  Foster,  conducting  business  as  a  member  of  the  Producers  Milk  Com- 
pany, with  offices  at  No.  119  East  Eighth  street  ni  Waterloo,  was  born  in  Aigona, 
Iowa,  in  1886,  a  son  of  James  A.  Foster,  now  a  retired  merchant  of  Burt,  Iowa. 
The  son  acquired  a  public-school  education  in  Kossuth  county,  Iowa,  passing 
through  consecutive  grades  until  he  became  a  high-school  pupil.  At  the  age  of 
twenty-three  years  he  started  out  in  the  business  world  on  his  own  account, 
opening  a  cleaning  and  dyeing  establishment,  which  he  conducted  for  two  years 
He  was  afterward  connected  with  a  business  similar  to  that  in  which  he  is  now 
engaged  and  ultimately  he  formed  a  partnership  with  his  brother,  Victor  B., 
and  organized  the  Producers  Milk  Company,  which  is  now  engaged  in  furnishing 
milk  for  the  wholesale  and  retail  trades.  The  company  was  organized  in  April, 
1914,  and  its  capacity  has  been  steadily  increased  until  they  now  have  one  of 
the  most  extensive  enterprises  of  the  kind  in  Waterloo.  Their  plant  is  equipped 
with  the  most  up-to-date  machinery  and  their  process  is  the  latest  method  of 
pasteurizing  milk.  Theirs  is  the  most  sanitary  plant  of  the  kind  in  Waterloo 
and  the  milk  v/hich  they  handle  is  all  bottled,  keeping  it  free  from  dust  and 
other  contaminating  influences.  The  brothers  conducted  the  business  alone 
until  October  21,  1914,  when  they  merged  their  interests  with  those  of  the  W.  S. 
Bishop  dairy  and  Mr.  Bishop  is  now  vice  president  of  the  company  with  \\\  O. 
Foster  as  president,  treasurer  and  manager,  and  Victor  B.  Foster  as  secretary. 

In  his  political  views  W.  O.  Foster  is  a  republican  and  keeps  well  informed 
on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  and  is  ever  ready  to  support  his  position 
by  intelligent  argument.  He  is  a  Mason,  holding  membership  in  the  lodge,  to 
the  teachings  of  which  he  is  loyal,  recognizing  the  value  of  its  beneficent  purposes. 


J.  B.  HIGHLAND. 


The  industrial  activity  of  Waterloo  finds  a  well  known  and  worthy  repre- 
sentative in  J.  B.  Highland,  who  is  superintendent  of  the  Waterloo  Gasoline 
Engine  Company  and  as  such  is  active  in  directing  one  of  the  important  indus- 
trial enterprises  of  the  city.  He  has  made  for  himself  a  creditable  name  and 
place  during  the  twelve  years  of  his  residence  in  AA^aterloo.  He  is  an  lowan  by 
birth,  training  and  preference,  for  he  was  born  in  Marion  county  in  1881  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  279 

remained  there  through  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth,  acquiring  his  edu- 
cation in  the  public  schools.  On  attaining  man's  estate  he  left  his  native  county 
and  made  his  way  to  Waterloo,  where  he  entered  the  eniploy  of  the  old  Hackett 
&  Daily  Creamery  Supply  Company,  remaining  with  them  and  their  successors, 
the  Iowa  Dairy  Separator  Company,  for  six  years.  Subsequently  he  was  with 
the  Peerless  Cream  Separator  Company  for  two  years.  He  was  also  for  two 
years  again  with  the  Iowa  Dairy  Separator  Company  and  in  May,  1910,  he 
entered  the  service  of  the  W^aterloo  Gasoline  Engine  Company,  of  which  he  was 
made  shop  foreman,  continuing  in  that  capacity  until  September,  1912,  when  he 
was  advanced  to  the  position  of  superintendent  of  the  plant,  m  which  connec- 
tion he  is  now  giving  his  attention  to  the  management  of  the  plant  and  those 
who  work  therein.  His  practical  experience  and  broad  knowledge  Avell  qualify 
him  to  carry  on  the  work  which  is  intrusted  to  him. 

In  1904  Mr.  Highland  married  Miss  Rosa  L.  Albert,  of  Waterloo,  and  they 
have  become  the  parents  of  three  children,  Wilson,  Paul  and  Lillian.  Mrs. 
Highland  is  a  granddaughter  of  Jacob  W.  Leeper,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneer 
settlers  of  Black  Haw^k  county,  arriving  here  about  1850.  Mr.  Highland  is  a 
member  of  the  Walnut  Street  Baptist  church  and  his  has  been  a  well  spent, 
active  and  useful  life,  bringing  to  him  a  measure  of  success  that  is  gratifying 
for  one  of  his  years. 


F.  A.  CARSON. 


F.  A.  Carson  is  superintendent  of  the  Prudential  Insurance  Company  for 
W'aterloo  and  this  district  and  has  his  offices  in  the  First  National  Bank  building. 
He  is  a  native  of  Hamilton  county,  Indiana,  and  a  son  of  D.  A.  Carson,  well 
known  as  one  of  the  oldtime  contractors  and  house  builders  of  Nobles ville, 
Indiana,  where  he  has  conducted  business  for  thirty  years.  His  wife  is  also 
living.  In  their  family  were  two  children,  the  daughter,  Anna,  being  now  the 
wife  of  George  Gibble,  who  resides  on  a  farm  near  Noblesville,  Indiana.  No 
deaths  have  occurred  in  the  family  since  F.  A.  Carson  was  bom. 

The  last  named  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  system  of  his  native  state  for 
the  educational  privileges  which  he  enjoyed.  In  early  life  he  learned  the  car- 
penter's trade  with  his  father,  who  was  a  skilled  workman  and  carefully  and 
wisely  directed  the  labors  of  the  son.  During  the  winter  months  when  building 
operations  were  suspended  he  worked  as  a  clerk  in  the  stores  and  thus  continued 
until  April,  1902,  when  he  became  agent  for  the  Prudential  Insurance  Company 
at  Noblesville,  Indiana.  He  had  control  of  a  municipal  township  surrounding 
the  city  and  after  eighteen  months  he  was  promoted  to  the  position  of  assistant 
superintendent.  In  1909  he  was  chosen  as  superintendent  of  the  Waterloo  dis- 
trict, which  mcludes  the  northern  and  eastern  sections  of  Iowa.  He  opened  up 
this  territory  for  the  company,  being  its  first  representative  in  this  part  of  the 
state,  and  here  he  has  since  continued.  He  has  one  of  the  three  district  offices 
in  the  state.  The  average  business  deposits  of  this  office  are  about  thirteen 
thousand  dollars  per  month,  or  about  one  hundred  and  fifty-six  thousand  dollars 
annually.     Mr.  Carson  has  been  located  in  Waterloo  for  six  years  and  under  his 


280  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

supervision  this  district  has  become  one  of  the  leading  districts  in  proportional 
results  in  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Mr.  Carson  devotes  his  undivided 
attention  to  the  interests  of  the  Prudential  Insurance  Company,  which  handles 
only  life  insurance. 

In  1890  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Carson  and  Miss  Armilda  E.  Harrison, 
a  daughter  of  Nelson  Harrison,  of  Noblesville,  Indiana,  who  is  a  retired  fai-mer. 
In  his  family  were  five  daughters  and  two  sons,  all  of  whom  are  yet  living. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Carson  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children :  Myrlea  A., 
born  in  1908 ;  and  Wilbur  A.,  in  December,  1909.  The  family  adheres  to  the 
faith  of  the  United  Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  Carson  holds  membership  with 
the  Knights  of  Pythias  of  Waterloo  and  the  Red  Men  and  Haymakers  of 
Noblesville,  Indiana.  He  has  made  steady  progress  since  starting  out  in  the 
business  world  on  his  own  account,  his  ability,  energy  and  determination  having 
led  him  into  important  relations. 


PETER  W.  KNIPP. 


Peter  W  .  Knipp,  a  representative  and  successful  agriculturist  of  Cedar  tovvn- 
.ship,  owns  one  hundred  and  eighty-two  acres  of  land  on  section  34  in  associa- 
tion with  his  father,  the  property  being  known  as  the  Miller  Creek  Stock  Farm. 
His  birth  occurred  in  Neunkirchen,  Germany,  on  the  9th  of  September,  1872, 
his  parents  being  William  and  Anna  M.  (Schmitz)  Knipp.  who  are  also  natives 
of  that  place.  The  father,  who  followed  farming  in  Germany,  brought  his 
family  to  the  United  States  and  in  1881  located  in  Peru,  Illinois.  A  short  time 
later  he  came  to  Black  Hawk  county,  Iowa,  cultivating  rented  land  in  Cedar 
township  for  one  year,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  purchased  a  house 
and  lot  in  Washburn  and  there  made  his  home  until  1889.  In  that  year  the  family 
removed  to  Arkansas  but  after  a  brief  period  went  to  Troy  Grove,  Illinois,  and 
remained  in  that  state  for  a  time.  Subsequently  they  returned  to  Washburn, 
Iowa,  where  William  Knipp  erected  a  residence  and  worked  on  the  section  for 
the  old  Burlington,  Cedar  Rapids  &  Northern  Railroad,  now  belonging  to  the  Rock 
Island  Railway  Company.  At  the  end  of  fifteen  years  he  severed  his  connection 
with  the  corporation  and  rented  a  farm  in  Poyner  township,  Black  Hawk  county, 
operating  the  place  for  four  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period,  in  asso- 
ciation with  his  son  Peter,  he  purchased  their  present  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
eighty-two  acres  on  section  34,  Cedar  township,  which  they  improved  and  in 
the  operation  of  which  they  have  been  busily  engaged  to  the  present  lime.  Wil- 
liam Knipp  is  now  seventy-three  years  of  age,  while  his  wife  has  reached  the 
age  of  seventy-one,  and  both  are  well  known  and  highly  esteemed  throughout 
the  community  as  people  of  genuine  personal  worth  and  upright,  honorable  lives. 

Peter  W.  Knipp  was  a  lad  of  eight  years  when  he  accompanied  his  parents 
on  their  emigration  to  the  new  world  and  his  education,  begun  in  the  schools  of 
Germany,  was  continued  in  this  county.  Subsequently  he  worked  with  his 
father  on  the  railroad  for  five  years,  and  the  interests  of  father  and  son  have 
always  been  identical.  Peter  W.  Knipp  purchased  his  present  farm  in  connec- 
tion with  his  father,  though  the  property  is  in  his  own  name.    It  has  been  known 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  281 

as  the  Barnes  Lake  Poultry  Farm  but  is  now  styled  the  Miller  Creek  "Stock 
Farm.  Mr.  Knipp  makes  a  specialty  of  thoroughbred  Guernsey  cattle,  Duroc 
Jersey  hogs  and  Rhode  Island  Red  chickens  and  in  his  undertakings  as  an  agri- 
culturist has  won  a  most  gratifying  and  well  merited  measure  of  prosperity. 
He  has  taken  particular  interest  in  the  growing  of  alfalfa.  He  is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Gilbertville  Dairy  Association,  operating  a  creamery  at  Gilbertville,  and 
was  one  of  its  directors  several  years. 

On  the  22d  of  May,  1900,  Mr.  Knipp  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Cather- 
ine Amfahr,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Anna  (Renter)  Amfahr,  the  former  a 
native  of  Illinois  and  the  latter  of  Germany.  William  Amfahr  took  up  his  abode 
among  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Eagle  township,  Black  Hawk  county,  Iowa,  and 
there  carried  on  farming  continuously  and  successfully  until  the  time  of  his 
retirement  in  September,  191 3.  He  is  now  living  retired  in  Jesup,  Iowa,  at  the 
age  of  fifty-seven  years,  but  his  wife  passed  away  December  2,  1910.  To  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Knipp  have  been  born  five  children,  namely :  William ;  Annie ;  Regina 
and  Christina,  twins ;  and  Lawrence. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Knipp  is  a  stanch  democrat  and  at  the  present 
time  holds  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace  in  Cedar  township,  having  made  a 
most  commendable  record  in  that  capacity  during  the  past  four  years.  He  has 
also  served  as  school  director,  and  the  cause  of  education  finds  in  him  a  stalwart 
champion.  He  belongs  to  the  Catholic  Order  of  Foresters  and  is  a  devout  com- 
municant of  the  Catholic  church.  Mr.  Knipp  has  been  carried  forward  into 
important  relations  with  agricultural  interests  of  his  locality,  and  his  personal 
characteristics  have  gained  him  the  lasting  regard  of  those  with  whom  he  has 
come  in  contact. 


CLAUDE  O.  FIKE. 


Claude  O.  Fike  is  engaged  in  the  general  real-estate  business,  handling  city 
I)roperty  in  Waterloo  and  farm  lands  in  various  sections  of  this  country  and  in 
Canada.  He  has  secured  a  good  clientage  and  the  substantial  and  continued 
growth  of  his  busuiess  is  indicative  of  the  enterprising  methods  which  he  fol- 
lows. He  was  born  in  Black  Hawk  county,  near  Waterloo,  June  30,  1890,  a  son 
of  Emanuel  and  Ella  (Hill)  Fike,  who  are  also  natives  of  this  county  and  repre- 
sentatives of  early  pioneer  families.  The  father  made  farming  his  life  work 
and  continued  to  engage  actively  in  that  pursuit  until  1913,  when  he  removed  to 
Waterloo,  where  he  is  now  living  practically  retired,  enjoying  in  well  earned 
rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil.  To  him  and  his  wife  were  born  five  children 
but  they  lost  their  eldest  in  infancy.  The  others  are :  Nira,  the  wife  of  George 
Benedict,  a  farmer  residing  south  of  Waterloo  ;  Claude  O.,  of  this  review ;  Ethel, 
the  wife  of  Clarence  Benedict,  who  is  engaged  in  the  vulcanizing  business  in 
Waterloo ;  and  Gladys,  at  home. 

Reared  upon  the  old  homestead  farm,  Claude  O.  Fike  divided  his  time  be- 
tween the  work  of  the  fields  and  attendance  at  the  country  schools.  He  con- 
tinued to  assist  his  father  until  nineteen  years  of  age,  after  which  he  spent  a 
year  in  travel  in  the  western  states.     At  the  age  of  twenty-one  he  began  farming 


282  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

on  his  own  account  in  Black  Hawk  county  and  devoted  the  succeeding  two  years 
to  that  pursuit,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of 
Marshall  &  Fike,  now  engaged  in  the  general  real-estate  business  in  Waterloo. 
They  handle  their  own  property  and  also  real  estate  belonging  to  others  and 
operate  in  Iowa  and  other  western  states  and  in  Canada.  They  sell  both  farm 
lands  and  city  property  and  have  negotiated  a  number  of  important  realty  trans- 
fers in  Waterloo.  Mr.  Fike  has  made  a  close  study  of  the  business  and  is  well 
acquainted  with  the  property  upon  the  market.  He  has  been  able  to  assist  many 
clients  in  making  judicious  investments  and  profitable  sales  and  his  own  success 
has  accrued  therefrom. 

On  the  1st  of  January,  191 1,  Mr.  Fike  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Eliza- 
beth Marshall,  a  native  of  Waterloo  and  a  daughter  of  George  and  Efifie  (Mc- 
Dowell) Marshall,  both  of  whom  were  born  in  Waterloo,  in  Avhich  city  the 
father  engaged  for  many  years  in  the  grocery  business.  He  also  spent  a  num- 
ber of  years  as  a  traveling  salesman  and  in  early  life  he  devoted  his  attention  to 
farming.  In  1912  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  real-estate  business  and  in 
1913  was  joined  by  Mr.  Fike  in  the  present  partnership,  under  the  firm  style  of 
Marshall  &  Fike.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fike  has  been  born  a  daughter,  Elinore 
Denile,  whose  birth  occurred  January  20,  1912.  The  parents  are  well  known 
in  Waterloo,  having  practically  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Black  Hawk  county, 
and  the  hospitality  of  many  of  the  best  homes  of  the  city  is  freely  accorded 
them.  Mr.  Fike  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  but  the 
honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  had  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  has 
always  preferred  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  afifairs,  and  what 
he  has  undertaken  has  brought  to  him  a  substantial  measure  of  success. 


W.  H.  BURK. 


W.  H.  Burk  is  the  auditor  and  treasurer  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  & 
Northern  Railroad.  He  came  to  this  city  in  January,  1910,  to  enter  upon  his 
present  connection  and  his  service  has  been  highly  satisfactory  to  those  whom 
he  represents.  He  was  born  in  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  in  November,  1873,  and 
was  educated  in  the  schools  there. 

Mr.  Burk  entered  the  employ  of  the  St.  Paul  &  Duluth  Railroad  Company, 
now  a  part  of  the  Northern  Pacific  system,  and  was  with  that  road  for  three 
years.  For  a  time  he  was  assistant  cashier  of  the  freight  department.  After- 
ward he  was  appointed  agent  of  the  Canada  Atlantic  Railway  and  still  later 
was  made  northwestern  agent  of  the  Canada  Atlantic  Transit  Company,  with 
which  he  remained  for  eight  years,  during  which  period  he  worked  his  way 
upward  to  a  position  of  importance  and  responsibility.  He  afterward  became 
commercial  agent  for  the  Chicago  Great  Western  Railway  and  was  located  at 
Minneapolis  for  five  months,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  was  sent  to  Boston, 
Massachusetts,  acting  as  New  England  agent  for  the  road  and  continuing  at 
that  point  for  a  year  and  a  half.  He  was  next  sent  to  New  York  city  as  gen- 
eral eastern  agent,  which  position  he  resigned  to  become  the  auditor  and  treas- 
urer of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad.     Each  change  that  he 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  283 

has  made  has  been  one  of  advancement.  He  is  president  of  the  Cedar  Valley 
Construction  Company  and  is  a  director  of  the  Iowa  Real  Estate  &  Investment 
Company  in  addition  to  his  connection  with  railway  interests. 

In  September,  1908,  Mr.  Biirk  was  married  to  Miss  Zathoe  Cass,  a  daughter 
of  L.  S.  Cass,  president  of  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Com- 
pany. They  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children,  Louis  Stephen  Cass, 
Richard  Jamar  and  Elizabeth  Mary. 

Mr.  Burk  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Sacred  Heart  church  and  he 
holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  with  the  Catholic  Club  of 
New  York.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  New  York  Athletic  Club,  while  in 
Waterloo  he  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade,  and 
also  of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  Much  of  his  life  has  been  spent  in  the  middle 
west  and  he  is  imbued  with  the  spirit  of  enterprise  and  progress  which  has  led 
to  the  rapid  development  and  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country. 


LOUIS  E.  RICE. 


Louis  E.  Rice  is  the  president  of  the  Rice  &  Dayton  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany, Incorporated,  of  Cedar  Falls,  and  as  such  occupies  a  leading  position  in 
business  circles  of  the  town.  He  was  born  in  Independence,  Iowa,  on  the  3d  of 
April,  1875,  a  son  of  Henry  P.  and  Lavina  E.  (Grout)  Rice.  The  father  was  a 
native  of  the  state  of  New  York  and  was  but  seven  years  of  age  when  he  came 
to  Iowa  with  his  father,  Henry  Rice,  Sr.,  who  located  on  a  farm  in  Black  Hawk 
county  which  he  entered  from  the  government.  This  was  in  the  year  1852.  He 
at  once  began  to  break  the  sod  and  turn  the  furrows  in  the  development  of  the 
fields  and  in  time  made  his  one  of  the  valuable  farms  of  the  district.  The  town 
of  Raymond  is  now  situated  thereon.  Henry  P.  Rice,  Jr.,  was  reared  upon  that 
place  and  at  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  enlisted  for  active  service  with  the 
Union  army,  with  which  he  remained  until  the  close  of  hostilities.  He  then 
returned  home  and  soon  afterward  was  married  in  Independence.  Through 
the  succeeding  fifteen  years  he  lived  upon  a  farm  near  Independence  and  in 
1 89 1  he  returned  to  Black  Hawk  county,  purchasing  a  tract  of  land  in  Union 
township,  seven  miles  northwest  of  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  still  resides,  being 
numbered  among  the  well-to-do  and  highly  respected  farmers  of  that  locality. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  Louis  E.  Rice  attended  both  the  district 
schools  and  the  city  schools  of  Independence  and  when  about  sixteen  years  of 
age  he  entered  upon  an  apprenticeship  at  the  gunsmith's  trade.  In  1891  he 
came  to  Cedar  Falls  and  opened  a  small  shop  for  the  sale  of  bicycles  and  general 
repair  work,  his  tools  consisting  of  little  more  than  a  screwdriver  and  a  monkey 
wrench.  He  developed  this  small  business  up  to  a  point  where  he  had  one  of 
the  finest  sporting  goods  stores  in  this  section  of  the  state.  About  1905  G.  R. 
Dayton  was  admitted  to  a  partnership  under  the  firm  name  of  Rice  &  Dayton. 
They  continued  the  business  until  1908  and  then  sold  their  stock  of  sporting 
goods  in  order  to  engage  in  the  manufacture  of  vulcanizers  and  other  auto 
specialties.  Again  they  started  out  on  a  small  scale  but  their  business  developed 
rapidly  and  they  gradually  drifted  into  the  wholesale  field,  handling  automobile 


284  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

supplies,  tools  and  electrical  specialties.  In  January,  191 1,  the  company  was 
incorporated  under  the  laws  of  Iowa  and  immediately  following  their  incorpora- 
tion they  began  the  erection  of  their  modern  business  building,  which  is  sixty- 
four  by  one  hundred  feet.  They  occupy  two  floors  of  this  building  and  have  a 
welding  department  in  a  separate  building.  The  plant  is  adequate  to  supply  and 
equip  any  garage  with  a  complete  workshop  and  outfit.  Their  business  has  be- 
come one  of  the  most  important  industrial  plants  of  Black  Hawk  county. 

In  1900  Air.  Rice  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  Waugh,  of  Cedar 
Falls.  They  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  are  highly  esteemed 
wherever  known.  Mr.  Rice  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished. 
He  has  embraced  opportunities  which  others  have  passed  heedlessly  by  and  as 
the  years  have  gone  on  he  has  made  a  creditable  record,  not  only  on  account  of 
his  success  but  also  owing  to  the  straightforward  business  policy  he  has  ever 
followed. 


RJCHARD  LEE. 


Richard  Lee,  optometrist  and  jeweler  of  Waterloo,  has  ever  held  to  high 
business  standards  and  each  forward  step  in  his  career  has  brought  him  a 
broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities.  He  was  born  in  Davis  county,  Iowa, 
in  1862,  a  son  of  Joseph  K.  and  Sarah  Lee,  who  about  1865  left  Davis  county 
and  went  to  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  where  the  father  conducted  what  was  known  as 
the  old  Skinner  Plow  &  Implement  Factory  for  a  number  of  years.  At  the  end 
of  that  period  he  purchased  a  farm  near  the  city  of  Des  Moines  and  continued 
its  cultivation  until  his  retirement  from  active  business.  At  length,  having 
acquired  a  handsome  competence  as  a  result  of  his  industry,  determination  and 
capable  management,  he  retired  from  active  business  and  took  up  his  abode  in 
Madrid,  where  both  he  and  his  wife  spent  their  remaining  days,  the  father 
passing  away  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years  and  the  mother  at  the  age  of  eighty. 
In  their  family  were  fourteen  children,  of  whom  four  have  passed  away. 

Richard  Lee  acquired  his  education  largely  in  the  schools  of  Polk  county, 
Iowa,  and  later  pursued  a  special  course  in  business  college  and  afterward  at- 
tended an  optical  college  in  Chicago,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1897.  He  remained  at  home  until  sixteen  years  of  age,  after  which  he  earned 
his  own  living  and  also  paid  his  way  through  school.  About  the  time  he  attained 
his  majority  he  took  up  watchmaking  and  engraving  with  E.  C.  Pike,  of  Boone, 
Iowa.  This  was  his  first  experience  in  connection  with  the  jeweler's  trade. 
After  a  short  time  he  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account  at  Madrid,  Iowa, 
where  he  remained  for  two  years.  He  next  removed  to  Sioux  City,  where  he 
conducted  a  watchmaking  and  general  repair  work  business  for  two  years.  At 
the  end  of  that  time  he  went  to  Grafton,  North  Dakota,  and  afterward  estab- 
lished his  home  m  Sioux  Falls,  South  Dakota,  where  he  made  a  specialty  of 
optical  work,  receiving  a  large  patronage  from  the  residents  of  Sioux  Falls  and 
the  surrounding  country.  After  five  years  he  removed  to  Sioux  City,  Iowa, 
and  for  a  brief  period  was  connected  with  the  C.  N.  Clark  Jewelry  Company. 
Still  later  he  conducted  an  optical  business  on  his  own  account  in  Sioux  City, 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  285 

drawing  his  trade  from  a  wide  territory,  and  in  1896  he  came  to  Waterloo, 
opening  a  store  on  Fourth  street.  There  he  remained  until  191 1,  when  he  re- 
moved to  Fifth  street,  opening  the  first  jewelry  store  on  that  thoroughfare. 

Mr.  Lee  conducts  a  general  jewelry  business,  doing  manufacturing  and  repair 
work  and  carrying  one  of  the  most  complete  stocks  of  jewelry  handled  in  this 
city,  including  diamonds,  watches,  jewelry  of  all  kinds,  cut  glass  and  optical 
goods.  His  establishment  is  most  attractive  by  reason  of  the  large  stock  and 
its  tasteful  arrangement.  Every  efifort  is  put  forth  to  please  customers  and  the 
business  methods  of  the  house  are  such  as  will  bear  the  closest  investigation  and 
scrutinv.  Mr.  Lee  also  does  a  wholesale  business  in  selling  material  to  other 
jewelers  of  Waterloo  and  throughout  the  state.  He  is  likewise  an  expert  en- 
graver. His  business  enterprise  has  prompted  his  connection  with  other  interests 
and  he  is  now  a  stockholder  in  the  Phillesola  banana  plantation  of  Mexico  and 
has  stock  in  the  Waverly  Brewery.  He  also  owns  mining  stock  in  two  copper 
mines  in  Montana  and  Idaho.  His  investments  have  been  judiciously  made  and 
success  in  considerable  measure  has  attended  his  efforts. 

In  1887  Mr.  Lee  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Page,  a  native  of 
Canada  but  born  of  English  parentage.  Her  father,  mother  and  other  relatives 
still  live  at  St.  Thomas,  Canada,  and  in  that  section  of  the  country.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Lee  have  become  parents  of  a  son,  Faye  Cecil,  who  was  born  in  1892.  He 
attended  the  high  school  at  Waterloo,  is  a  graduate  of  the  Waterloo  College  of 
Commerce  of  the  class  of  1910  and  is  now  following  his  father's  line  of  business. 
He  has  made  a  study  of  optometry  as  a  profession  and  has  gained  notable  skill 
in  optical  work.  He  married  Miss  Frances  Rittler,  a  native  of  Iowa  and  a 
daughter  of  H.  W.  and  Lettie  Rittler.  They  were  married  in  1912  and  now 
reside  at  Faith,  South  Dakota. 

Mr.  Lee  is  a  very  prominent  Mason.  He  has  become  a  Knight  Templar  of 
the  York  Rite  and  is  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  likewise  connected 
with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 
The  record  which  the  American  citizen  holds  in  highest  honor  is  that  of  a  self- 
made  man.  Such  is  the  life  history  of  Richard  Lee,  who  at  the  age  of  sixteen 
years  started  out  upon  his  own  account  and  has  advanced  steadily  step  by  step, 
his  determination  and  even  paced  energy  carrying  him  into  important  relations. 
He  has  never  overestimated  his  own  capacities  and  powers  nor  overvalued  his 
opportunities;  on  the  contrary  his  judgment  is  sound  and  through  well  formu- 
lated plans  carried  carefully  forward  to  successful  completion  he  has  gained  for 
himself  the  prominent  position  which  he  now  occupies  as  a  business  man  of 
Waterloo. 


H.  W.  FLINT. 


H.  W.  Flint  is  a  leading  commercial  and  portrait  photographer  of  Waterloo. 
He  has  mastered  all  of  the  intricacies  of  the  art  and  the  excellence  of  his  work 
insures  to  him  a  liberal  patronage.  He  was  born  in  Chatham,  Ontario,  Canada, 
on  the  4th  of  April,  1879,  ^  son  of  William  and  Rose  (Clift)  Flint,  both  of 
whom  were  natives  of  England,  in  which  country  they  were  reared.      It  was 


286  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

after  they  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  Canada,  however,  that  they  were  married,  the 
wedding  being  celebrated  in  Chatham.  There  the  father  engaged  in  the  tailor- 
ing business  until  1888,  when  he  crossed  the  border  into  the  United  States  and 
made  his  way  to  Eagle  Grove,  Iowa.  Subsequently  he  removed  to  Ames,  where 
he  now  resides,  and  he  is  still  actively  engaged  in  the  tailoring  business,  to  which 
he  has  devoted  his  entire  life. 

H.  W.  Flint  spent  the  first  nine  years  of  his  life  in  his  native  country  and 
then  accompanied  his  parents  to  this  state.  His  education  was  largely  acquired 
in  the  Des  Moines  and  Eagle  Grove  public  schools  and  in  Bowen's  Business 
College  of  Des  Moines.  Following  the  completion  of  his  course  he  took  up  the 
study  of  photography  in  the  gallery  of  Tom  James,  of  Des  Moines,  with  whom 
he  remained  for  three  years,  becoming  familiar  with  all  the  mechanical  processes 
connected  with  the  business  and  largely  developing  his  artistic  skill  and  dis- 
crimination. He  next  entered  the  gallery  of  T.  W.  Townsend  of  Iowa  City, 
with  whom  he  also  continued  for  three  years,  and  in  1902  he  came  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  opened  a  studio  in  the  old  Phelps  building.  In  1908  he  removed  to  the 
Bunt  building  at  the  corner  of  ^^'est  Park  avenue  and  Commercial  street,  where 
he  now  occupies  a  commodious  and  pleasant  suite  of  rooms.  His  studio  is 
splendidly  equipped  in  every  particular  and  he  has  always  kept  in  touch  with 
the  most  advanced  scientific  methods  and  processes  of  photography  and  at  the 
same  time  he  is  a  close  student  of  those  artistic  phases  of  the  business  which 
find  expression  in  effects  of  pose,  light  and  shade.  His  work  is  indeed  artistic 
and  his  business  is  growing  year  by  year. 

Mr.  Flint  was  married  in  Iowa  City  in  1901  to  Miss  Clara  M.  Tanner,  of 
Iowa  City,  a  daughter  of  Frank  Tanner,  former  postmaster  of  Iowa  City  and 
one  of  the  prominent  business  men  there.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Flint  have  become 
parents  of  a  daughter,  Alene  T.  Mr.  Flint  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge,  No. 
290,  B.  P.  O.  E.,  and  to  Helmet  Lodge,  No.  89,  K.  P.  In  politics  he  is  an 
earnest  republican  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Episcopal  church, 
in  which  he  is  serving  as  vestryman.  His  has  been  a  well  spent  life  and  the 
many  sterling  traits  of  his  character  have  won  for  him  the  high  regard  and 
confidence  of  all  who  know  him.  Because  of  the  innate  refinement  of  his  nature 
he  rejects  everything  opposed  to  good  taste  and  the  high  ideals  which  he  cherishes 
in  his  business  and  in  citizenship  find  embodiment  in  practical  effort  for  their 
adoption. 


DR.  S.  BRUCE  GALLOWAY. 

Dr.  S.  Bruce  Galloway,  who  for  three  years  has  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
naprapathy  in  Waterloo,  meeting  with  substantial  and  well  deserved  success,  is 
a  native  of  Ringgold  county.  Iowa,  born  in  1888.  His  more  specifically  literary 
education  was  acquired  in  Monmouth  College  at  Monmouth,  Illinois,  and  then 
in  preparation  for  a  professional  career  he  entered  the  Chicago  College  of 
Naprapathy,  where  he  pursued  the  regular  course.  He  also  took  post-graduate 
work  in  the  National  College  of  Medicine  in  Chicago  in  1912.  Immediately 
after  preparing  for  the  profession  he  located  in  Waterloo,  where  he  has  since 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  287 

engaged  in  the  practice  of  naprapathy,  which  deals  with  the  treatment  of  the 
nerves  and  ligaments  of  the  body.  He  has  a  comprehensive  knowledge  of 
anatomy  and  the  component  parts  of  the  human  body  and  is  thus  able  by  scien- 
tific methods  to  so  treat  his  patients  that  splendid  results  are  achieved.  He  is 
now  president  of  the  Waterloo  Drug  Company  and  he  is  regarded  as  one  of 
the  alert  and  progressive  young  professional  men  of  the  city.  He  is  most  care- 
ful and  conscientious  in  the  performance  of  his  professional  duties  and  by 
reason  thereof  has  built  up  an  extensive  and  well  deserved  practice.  He  has 
also  become  well  known  socially  during  the  three  years  of  his  residence  in  the 
city  and  has  gained  the  warm  friendship  of  many  with  whom  he  has  been 
brought  in  contact. 


ARTHUR  E.  BICKNELL. 

In  musical  circles  of  Cedar  Falls  the  name  of  Arthur  E.  Bicknell  figures 
prominently,  for  he  is  well  known  as  a  teacher  and  also  as  proprietor  of  a  music 
store,  dealing  in  pianos,  players  and  other  merchandise  of  that  character.  He 
was  born  in  Lewiston,  Maine,  June  3,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  Samuel  F.  and 
Elizabeth  (Burnham)  Bicknell,  both  of  whom  have  now  passed  away.  The 
father  was  engaged  in  the  wholesale  and  retail  grocery  business,  spending  the 
greater  part  of  his  life  in  Salem,  Massachusetts,  where  he  removed  at  an  early 
day.     Neither  he  nor  his  wife  ever  came  to  the  west  to  reside. 

Reared  in  Salem,  Massachusetts,  Arthur  E.  Bicknell  attended  the  public 
schools  and  remained  under  the  parental  roof  until  he  attained  his  majority. 
Attracted  by  the  opportunities  offered  to  young  men  in  the  growing  west,  he 
then  left  New  England  and,  severing  home  ties,  made  his  way  to  Iowa,  arriving 
in  Cedar  Falls  m  1889.  Since  then  he  has  figured  prominently  in  musical  circles 
in  this  city.  He  has  engaged  in  teaching  music,  to  which  he  still  devotes  part 
of  his  time,  and  he  is  conducting  a  growing  and  profitable  business  as  a  dealer 
in  pianos,  players  and  other  musical  instruments.  He  is  likewise  the  owner  of 
valuable  farm  lands,  devoting  a  portion  of  his  time  to  the  management  of  his 
real-estate  holdings.  He  is  also  a  stockholder  in  the  Wagner  Manufacturing 
Company  and  thus  has  become  an  important  factor  in  commercial  and  agri- 
cultural circles  in  his  section  of  the  county. 

On  the  2 1st  of  October,  1891,  Mr.  Bicknell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Mary  Elizabeth  Van  Tilburg,  who  was  born  near  Finchford,  Butler  county, 
Iowa,  a  daughter  of  Flarvey  H.  and  INIargaret  (McCarty)  Van  Tilburg,  who 
were  natives  of  Pennsylvania  and  came  to  Iowa  at  an  early  period  in  its  de- 
velopment. They  first  settled  at  Cedar  Falls  and  afterward  removed  to  a  farm, 
becoming  residents  of  Butler  county.  Later  they  again  took  up  their  abode  in 
Cedar  Falls,  where  the  father  now  resides,  living  retired.  The  mother,  however, 
has  passed  away.  He  served  as  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war  and  is  now  one  of 
the  honored  Union  veterans.  Mrs.  Bicknell  was  one  of  a  family  of  six  children 
and  acquired  her  education  in  the  schools  of  Cedar  Falls.  Mr.  Bicknell  has  one 
child  by  a  former  marriage,  Karl  A.,  who  was  bom  October  12,   1887,  and  is 


288  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

now  a  resident  of  Charlotte,  North  CaroHna,  where  he  is  in  charge  of  the  dye 
stuffs  in  a  business  of  that  character  of  extensive  proportions. 

Mr.  Bicknell  is  a  member  of  Black  Hawk  Lodge,  No.  65,  A.  F.  <^-  A.  M. ; 
Valley  Chapter,  No.  20,  R.  A.  AL  ;  Commandery  No.  11,  K.  T..  of  Cedar  Falls, 
Iowa;  Iowa  Consistory,  No.  2;  and  El  Kahir  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S..  of 
Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican  with  independent  tendencies 
but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  little  attraction  for  him  as  he  has 
always  preferred  to  devote  his  attention  to  his  business  affairs  and  investments, 
which  have  been  carefuliy  managed  and  have  brought  to  him  a  gratifying  return. 


D.  W.  BO\'EE. 


Industrial  activity  in  Waterloo  fmds  a  worthy  representative  in  D.  W.  Bovee, 
who  is  president  and  treasurer  of  the  Bovee  Furnace  Company,  which  was  in- 
corporated in  1896.  The  secretary  of  the  company  is  A.  C.  Bovee  and  the  busi- 
ness is  capitalized  for  twenty-five  thousand  dollars.  This  is  a  close  corporation 
and  there  is  a  reserve  fund  of  fifty  thousand  dollars.  It  was  in  the  year  1894 
that  D.  W'.  Bovee,  who  is  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  arrived  in  Waterloo  and 
through  the  intervening  period  to  the  present  he  has  been  actively  and  success- 
fully connected  with  business  affairs. 

A  year  after  his  arrival  in  Waterloo  he  established  his  present  business  and 
has  won  success  from  the  beginning  in  the  manufacture  of  hot  air  furnaces, 
feed  mills  and  other  devices.  The  output  finds  favor  with  the  public  as  is  indi- 
cated by  the  growing  patronage.  They  employ  about  thirty  people  annually 
and  handle  their  output  through  retail  dealers.  The  Bovee  furnaces  have  a 
national  reputation  and  are  shipped  in  large  numbers  into  practically  every 
state  in  the  Union.  This  is  but  one  phase  of  ^Ir.  Bovee's  business  enterprise 
and  indicates  but  one  feature  in  the  success  whicli  has  made  him  one  of  the 
prosperous  residents  of  Waterloo.  He  has  made  extensive  and  judicious  in- 
vestments in  real  estate  and  now  has  about  sixty  lots  in  the  business  district  of 
the  city  together  with  a  numljcr  of  residence  properties,  from  which  he  derives 
a  substantial  annual  income. 

In  1873  ^^^-  Bovee  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Anna  Palmer,  of  Wis- 
consin, and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children:  Lulu,  now  the  wife 
of  D.  L.  Morrow,  of  Waterloo  ;  and  Helen,  who  is  a  senior  in  the  high  school. 
The  elder  daughter  was  graduated  from  the  West  Waterloo  high  school  and 
then  entered  the  Teachers  College  at  Cedar  Falls,  in  which  she  completed  her 
course,  while  later  she  was  graduated  from  the  Waterloo  Business  College. 

Mr.  Bovee  is  a  member  of  the  United  Brethren  church  and  is  serving  on 
the  official  board.  He  takes  an  active  interest  in  the  work  of  the  church,  con- 
tributes generously  to  its  support  and  does  all  in  his  power  to  advance  its 
interests.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  Waterloo 
Club,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member  from  its  organization.  His  name  is  like- 
wise on  the  membership  roll  of  the  Town  Criers  Club.  In  the  years  of  his 
residence  in  Waterloo  he  has  become  well  known  as  a  representative  of  that  class 
of  enterprising,  progressive  citizens  who  are  bringing  about  the  substantial  and 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  289 

rapid  upbuilding  of  the  west.  Early  in  his  career  he  recognized  the  eternal 
principle  of  industry  and  throughout  his  entire  career  his  industry  has  been  the 
strong  foundation  upon  which  he  has  builded  his  prosperity.  It  also  has  been 
well  said  that  integrity  is  the  cornerstone  of  his  character. 


E.  B.  FOSS. 


E.  B.  Foss  is  proprietor  of  the  Rural  Home  Stock  Farm,  situated  on  section 
26,  Big  Creek  township.  He  was  born  in  Illinois  in  July,  1853,  a  son  of  B.  V. 
and  Elizabeth  (Gray)  Foss,  who  were  natives  of  New  Hampshire  and  New 
Brvinswick  respectively.  In  early  life  the  father  went  to  Illinois,  casting  in  his 
lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers  of  that  state,  and  again  he  became  connected  with 
pioneer  life  when  in  1855  he  arrived  in  Black  Hawk  county,  where  he  carried 
on  farming  for  three  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  returned  to  Illinois  and 
again  engaged  in  farming  in  that  state  until  1871,  when  he  once  more  came  to 
Black  Hawk  county.  At  that  date  he  purchased  land  near  La  Porte  City,  in 
Big  Creek  township,  and  at  once  began  to  improve  and  develop  the  place,  con- 
tinuing its  cultivation  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  January,  1904.  He 
had  survived  his  wife  for  almost  a  year,  her  death  having  occurred  in  February, 
1903. 

E.  B.  Foss  spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Illinois  and  in  Black 
Hawk  county,  remaining  with  his  parents  until  he  attained  his  majority.  He 
was  content  to  follow  the  occupation  to  which  he  had  been  reared  and  rented 
land  for  four  years,  during  which  time  he  carefully  saved  his  earnings,  so  that 
he  was  able  to  purchase  eighty  acres  in  Big  Creek  township.  This  he  at  once 
began  to  cultivate  and  further  improve,  remaining  upon  that  farm  until  1889, 
when  he  sold  out  and  bought  two  hundred  acres  on  section  26,  where  he  now 
resides.  To  his  holdings  he  added  from  time  to  time,  thus  extending  the 
boundaries  of  his  farm  until  he  now  owns  four  hundred  acres  of  fine  land  on 
which  are  two  sets  of  excellent  farm  buildings,  all  erected  by  him.  He  has 
operated  his  farm  in  most  systematic,  practical  and  progressive  manner,  keeping 
in  touch  with  modern  methods  and  using  the  latest  improved  machinery  to 
facilitate  the  work  of  the  fields.  In  connection  with  the  tilling  of  the  soil  he 
engages  in  stock-raising,  making  a  specialty  of  Duroc-Jersey  hogs  and  shorthorn 
cattle. 

In  February,  1876,  Mr.  Foss  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  P.  Finch, 
a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Catherine  (Pray)  Finch,  who  were  natives  of  Bath, 
England,  and  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  respectively.  The  father  was  a  car- 
riage maker  by  trade,  but  after  coming  to  Black  Hawk  county  in  1867  turned 
his  attention  to  farming,  which  he  followed  for  eight  years.  On  the  expiration 
of  that  period  he  returned  to  the  east  and  purchased  a  fruit  farm  in  New  Jersey 
upon  which  he  spent  his  remaining  days.  He  died  in  April,  1890,  while  his  wife 
passed  away  in  November,  1891.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Foss  have  been  bom  ten 
children,  as  follows :  Clyde  E.,  who  is  a  resident  of  Webster,  South  Dakota ; 
Amy  E.,  who  passed  away  in  April,  1914,  leaving  two  children,  Morris  and 
Evelyn,  who  now  make  their  home  with  our  subject;  Delbert  R.,  whose  demise 


290  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

occurred  in  July,  1881 ;  Ray  F.,  who  died  in  September,  1898;  Monte  G.,  who 
cultivates  one  hundred  and  eighty  acres  of  his  father's  farm;  and  Glenn  R., 
Floy  E.,  Shelby  W.,  Ralph  R.  and  Alan  B.,  all  at  home. 

Mr,  Foss  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and  measures 
of  the  republican  party  and  has  been  called  to  some  local  offices.  He  served  as 
assessor  of  his  township  for  a  number  of  years  and  at  the  election  of  November, 
1914,  was  chosen  a  trustee.  He  never  falters  in  the  performance  of  his  political 
duties  and  is  actuated  at  all  times  by  a  desire  to  advance  the  public  welfare. 
His  religious  belief  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church  and  to  its  teachings  he  is 
loyal,  his  life  being  in  consistent  harmony  therewith. 


RALPH  B.  SLIPPY. 


Ralph  B.  Slippy,  of  Waterloo,  who  has  attained  high  rank  in  the  profession 
of  civil  engineering,  has  also  various  other  business  interests  and  connections  in 
Black  Hawk  county.  So  extensive  and  important  are  his  business  affairs  that  his 
efforts  are  counted  as  a  tangible  asset  in  the  material  upbuilding  of  the  city.  He 
was  bom  at  Reinbeck,  Iowa,  on  the  21st  of  January,  1881,  a  son  of  William  A. 
and  Minnie  J.  (Young)  Slippy,  the  former  a  native  of  Ohio  and  the  latter  of 
Iowa.  In  early  life  the  father  was  a  traveling  salesman  for  a  short  time,  but 
afterward  entered  the  mercantile  business,  to  which  he  devoted  the  greater  part  of 
his  life  until  about  1906,  when  he  became  connected  with  insurance  interests  and 
is  now  head  bookkeeper  for  the  Iowa  Manufacturers  Insurance  Company  of 
Waterloo.  While  living  in  Reinbeck  he  served  as  mayor  for  one  term  and  has 
ever  been  a  public-spirited  citizen,  interested  in  measures  and  movements  for 
the  general  good. 

Ralph  B.  Slippy  is  the  eldest  of  five  living  children  in  a  family  which  numbered 
twelve  children.  Among  these  he  was  the  third  in  order  of  birth,  but  seven  of  the 
number  have  passed  away,  leaving  him  the  eldest  survivor.  He  was  graduated 
from  the  Reinbeck  high  school  with  the  class  of  1898  and  afterward  entered 
Cornell  College,  in  which  he  completed  his  course  by  graduation  with  the  class  of 
1903  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Civil  Engineering.  He  won  his  professional 
degree  of  Civil  Engineering  from  that  institution  in  1905.  He  was  seven- 
teen years  of  age  when  he  entered  Cornell  College,  working  his  way  through  that 
institution,  his  desire  for  and  determination  to  secure  an  education  being  an 
indication  of  the  elemental  strength  of  his  character.  He  was  engaged  in  survey- 
ing during  the  summer  of  1903  and  in  the  fall  of  that  year  he  became  connected 
with  Armour  Institute  of  Chicago,  where  he  taught  until  February,  1904,  when  he 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Muscatine  Water  Power  Company  at  Muscatine,  Iowa, 
with  which  he  remained  until  April,  1904.  He  afterward  engaged  in  the  private 
practice  of  his  profession  in  Waterloo  for  a  year  and  at  the  end  of  that  time  became 
assistant  engineer  of  the  city  of  Waterloo,  occupying  that  position  until  the  fall 
of  1906.  Through  the  four  succeeding  years  he  was  instructor  in  civil  engineering 
in  the  University  of  Illinois  and  he  spent  the  summer  vacation  of  1907  as  an 
active  representative  of  his  profession  in  Georgia,  while  the  other  three  vacations 
during  the  period  of  his  connection  with  the  Illinois  University  were  passed  in 


EALPH  B.  SLIPPY 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  293 

Waterloo.  He  afterward  became  locating  engineer  for  the  Waterloo,  Cedar  Falls 
&  Northern  Railroad  Company,  with  which  he  continued  until  the  spring  of  191 1, 
since  which  time  he  has  engaged  in  the  general  practice  of  civil  engineering  in 
Waterloo.  In  1912  he  also  turned  his  attention  to  the  automobile  business  which 
he  conducts  under  the  name  of  the  Interstate  Motor  Car  Company.  Extending 
his  efforts  over  a  still  wider  field,  he  organized,  in  1914,  the  Waverly  Stone  & 
Gravel  Company,  of  which  he  is  the  president  and  general  manager,  operating 
a  gravel  pit  and  stone  crusher  at  Waverly.  His  business  interests,  extensive  and 
varied,  are  of  the  utmost  importance  to  the  communities  in  which  he  operates, 
for  he  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose  and  carries  forward  to  successful  com- 
pletion whatever  he  undertakes. 

On  the  23d  of  December,  1903,  Mr.  Slippy  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Georgiana  Vine  Newton,  who  was  born  in  La  Porte  City,  Iowa,  a  daughter  of 
M.  L.  and  Sophia  (Berry)  Newton,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Illinois,  born 
near  Freeport.  They  came  to  Iowa  in  the  early  "70s.  settling  in  La  Porte  City, 
where  they  were  married.  The  father  was  a  civil  engineer  and  served  in  his 
professional  capacity  at  Waterloo  and  was  also  county  surveyor  of  Black  Hawk 
county,  while  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  consulting  engineer  for  the  Waterloo, 
Cedar  Falls  &  Northern  Railroad  Company.  He  passed  away  in  January,  191 1, 
while  his  widow  still  resides  in  Waterloo.  Mrs.  Slippy  is  their  only  surviving 
child. 

Mr.  Slippy  belongs  to  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M..  of  which  he 
was  the  senior  warden  in  1914;  Tabernacle  Chapter,  No.  52,  R.  A.  M.,  of  which 
he  was  high  priest  in  191 3 ;  and  Crescent  Council,  No.  16,  R.  &  S.  M.,  of  which  he 
was  captain  of  the  guard  in  1914.  His  religious  faith  is  indicated  in  his  member- 
ship in  the  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican,  but 
with  independent  tendencies,  and  has  never  been  a  politician  in  the  sense  of  office 
seeking.  He  served,  however,  as  deputy  county  surveyor,  as  assistant  city  engi- 
neer and  is  the  present  weather  observer,  taking  on  the  duties  of  the  latter  position 
voluntarily.  He  belongs  to  the  Iowa  Engineering  Society  and  is  serving  on  its 
committee  on  roads  and  pavements.  He  has  made  continuous  advancement  in  his 
profession  and  along  business  lines  and  his  worth,  both  as  a  business  man  and  as 
a  citizen,  is  widely  acknowledged.  He  is  actuated  by  laudable  ambition  that 
urges  him  on  constantly  toward  greater  efficiency  and  larger  attainment. 


ANTON  BURGER. 


Anton  Burger  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  A.  Burger  &  Son.  dealers  in  flour 
and  feed  in  Waterloo.  He  was  born  in  the  Rhine  province  of  Germany  on  the 
9th  of  March,  1866,  his  parents  being  Anton  and  Catherine  (Gippert)  Burger, 
both  of  whom  passed  away  in  Germany.  Through  the  period  of  his  boyhood 
days  spent  under  the  parental  roof  the  son  attended  the  public  schools  and  on 
reaching  early  manhood  engaged  in  agency  work.  In  1885  he  entered  the  Ger- 
man army,  in  which  he  served  for  three  years,  and  subsequently  he  engaged 
in  the  insurance  business  in  the  Cologne  district  of  Germany.  He  was  identi- 
fied with  that  business   for  eight  years  and  then,  hoping  to   find  still  broader 

Vol.  II— 16 


294  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

business  opportunities  in  the  new  world,  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  United 
States  and  in  1897  took  up  his  abode  upon  a  farm  near  Jesup,  Iowa.  For  about 
a  year  and  a  half  Air.  Burger  was  employed  as  a  farm  hand  and  for  the  same 
period  worked  as  a  clerk  in  a  general  store  in  Jubilee.  Subsequently  he  engaged 
in  farming  on  his  own  account,  cultivating  rented  land  in  Black  Hawk  and 
Fayette  counties  for  about  ten  years,  during  which  time  his  financial  resources 
gradually  increased  as  the  result  of  his  industry,  enterprise  and  judicious  expen- 
diture. Having  thus  acquired  a  substantial  capital,  he  bought  the  flour  and 
feed  business  of  Knipp  &  Roth,  of  Waterloo,  in  1910  and  thus  became  a  factor 
in  the  business  circles  of  this  city.  Through  the  intervening  four  years  to  the 
present  time  he  has  become  prominently  known  as  a  business  man  of  Waterloo 
and  is  at  the  head  of  an  extensive  trade  in  his  line. 

In  1887.  in  Cologne,  Germany,  Mr.  Burger  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Eva  Pruemmer,  and  unto  them  have  been  born  three  children:  Catherine,  the 
wife  of  Frank  Manske,  a  resident  of  Waterloo ;  John,  who  is  his  father's  partner 
in  business  under  the  firm  name  of  A.  Burger  &  Son;  and  Anna,  who  is  still 
attending  school.  The  parents  hold  membership  in  the  Catholic  church,  in  which 
faith  they  have  reared  their  children. 

Mr.  Burger  also  belongs  to  the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles  and  his  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  democratic  party.  He  has  never  had  occasion  to 
regret  his  determination  to  come  to  the  new  world,  for  here  he  has  found  the 
business  opportunities  which  he  sought  and  which,  by  the  way,  are  always  open 
to  ambitious,  energetic  young  men.  Gradually  he  has  worked  his  way  upward 
and,  although  he  started  out  in  life  in  America  practically  empty-handed,  he  is 
now  at  the  head  of  a  substantial  and  growing  business,  which  is  the  visible  evi- 
dence of  his  life  of  thrift  and  industry. 


GAYLORD  R.  DAYTON. 

Gaylord  R.  Dayton  is  a  well  known  and  successful  representative  of  business 
interests  in  Cedar  Falls  as  the  vice  president  of  the  Rice  &  Dayton  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  a  concern  with  which  he  became  identified  in  1906.  His  birth 
occurred  in  Martinsburg,  Ohio,  on  the  13th  of  November,  1870,  his  parents  be- 
ing Martin  N.  and  Sarah  (Bowland)  Dayton,  the  former  a  native  of  Danville, 
Knox  county,  Ohio,  and  the  latter  of  Knoxville,  that  state.  Their  marriage 
was  celebrated  in  the  Buckeye  state,  where  Alartin  N.  Dayton  was  for  several 
years  engaged  in  merchandising  at  Martinsburg.  On  the  ist  of  March.  1871, 
he  came  west  to  Iowa,  locating  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  he  purchased  an  interest 
in  the  mill  being  operated  by  J.  E.  Rhodes,  forming  the  Rhodes  &  Dayton  Mill- 
ing Company.  Subsequently  he  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Waterloo  & 
Cedar  Falls  Union  Alills  Company  and  for  years  acted  as  its  president.  He  con- 
tinued his  active  participation  in  the  conduct  of  the  mill  until  the  time  of  his 
death,  which  occurred  on  the  i8th  of  January,  1899,  when  he  had  attained  the 
age  of  sixty-five  years.  He  enjoyed  an  enviable  reputation  as  one  of  the  fore- 
most business  men  of  Black  Hawk  county  and  it  was  largely  through  his  capable 
business  management  that  the  Waterloo  S:  Cedar  Falls  Milling  Company  became 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  295 

one  of  the  most  successful  industries  in  this  section  of  the  state.  When  he 
associated  himself  with  the  enterprise  it  was  freely  predicted  by  his  friends  that 
he  would  lose  all  his  money,  for  it  had  previously  been  an  unprofitable  under- 
taking. His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party  and  for  several 
years  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  Cedar  Falls  city  council.  Mrs.  Dayton  still 
survives  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-four  years  and  resides  in  the  handsome 
family  residence  on  the  corner  of  Sixth  and  Main  streets  in  Cedar  Falls.  She  is 
a  devoted  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  to  which  Mr.  Dayton  also  be- 
longed, and  in  the  work  of  which  he  took  a  very  active  and  helpful  part,  serving 
for  many  years  in  the  capacity  of  trustee. 

Gaylord  R.  Dayton,  brought  to  Cedar  Falls  in  his  infancy,  was  educated  in 
the  high  school  of  this  city  and  in  1890  entered  the  service  of  the  Rock  Island 
Railway  Company.  At  the  end  of  about  a  year,  however,  he  went  to  Mankato, 
Minnesota,  where  he  was  employed  in  a  hardware  store  for  fifteen  months. 
On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  returned  to  Cedar  Falls  and  was  here  identi- 
fied with  his  father  in  the  milling  business  until  the  latter's  death.  Subsequently 
his  attention  was  given  to  the  supervision  of  bis  father's  estate  and  in  1906  he 
purchased  an  interest  in  the  sporting  goods  business  of  L.  E.  Rice,  forming  the 
firm  of  Rice  &  Dayton.  In  this  connection  he  has  won  a  gratifying  and  well 
merited  measure  of  success  and  has  become  recognized  as  one  of  the  substantial, 
enterprising  and  prosperous  representatives  of  manufacturing  interests  in  the 
city.   . 

On  the  26th  of  October,  1904.  Mr.  Dayton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Alta  B.  Simpson,  of  Cedar  Falls,  her  father  being  C.  T.  Simpson,  a  building 
contractor  of  this  city.  They  now  have  one  son,  Martin  N.  Air.  Dayton  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  while  his  religious  faith  is  that 
of  the  Presbyterian  church,  to  which  his  wife  also  belongs.  Practically  his 
entire  life  has  been  spent  in  Cedar  Falls  and  he  has  made  many  friends  in  both 
Dusiness  and  social  circles. 


EDWIN  T.  JAYNES,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Edwin  T.  Jaynes  has  been  engaged  in  practice  as  a  physician  and  surgeon 
of  Waterloo  since  August,  1910,  and  is  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  fore- 
most representatives  of  the  profession  in  the  city.  His  birth  occurred  in  La- 
monte,  Missouri,  on  the  3d  of  December,  1869,  his  parents  being  Alfred  T.  and 
Lorinda  J.  (Gregory)  Jaynes,  both  of  whom  are  deceased.  In  the  acquirement 
of  his  early  education  he  attended  the  public  schools  and  subsequently  continued 
his  studies  in  the  Presbyterian  University  of  South  Dakota,  then  located  at 
Pierre,  which  institution  conferred  upon  him  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science 
in  1891. 

In  the  fall  of  that  year  Dr.  Jaynes  began  the  study  of  medicine  in  Rush 
Medical  College  of  Chicago,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of 
1894.  During  the  succeeding  year  he  served  as  an  interne  in  the  Cook  County 
Hospital  and  then  located  for  practice  at  New  Hartford,  Butler  county,  Iowa, 
where   he    followed   his   profession   continuously   and    successfully    for   thirteen 


296  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  removed  to  Parkersburg,  that  county, 
and  was  there  engaged  in  practice  for  two  years  or  until  August,  1910,  when  he 
came  to  Waterloo,  which  city  has  since  remained  the  scene  of  his  professional 
labors  and  where  he  has  built  up  an  extensive  and  gratifying  patronage.  In 
1905  he  went  to  Europe  for  post-graduate  work,  pursuing  special  courses  in 
internal  medicine  and  pathology  at  Vienna.  He  moreover  keeps  in  close  touch 
with  the  progress  of  the  profession  through  his  membership  in  the  Waterloo 
City  Medical  Society,  the  Black  Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  the  Iowa  State 
Medical  Society  and  the  American  Medical  Association. 

In  May,  1906,  Dr.  Jaynes  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mabelle  Ferguson, 
of  New  Hartford,  Iowa,  by  whom  he  has  three  children,  namely:  Gertrude 
Helene,  \'ernon  Hewitt  and  Eileen.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  Waterloo 
Lodge  of  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  Pythian  Lodge  of  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  and  Waterloo  Lodge,  No.  105,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  while  both  he 
and  his  wife  belong  to  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star. 


CHARLES  H.  PLUMMER. 

In  the  death  of  Charles  H.  Plummer,  Black  Hawk  county  lost  a  valued  and 
representative  citizen.  He  was  filling  the  office  of  recorder  of  deeds  and  made 
an  excellent  record  in  that  connection.  His  public  and  private  duties  were  dis- 
charged with  equal  fidelity  and  promptness,  and  wherever  known  he  was  held 
in  high  regard  because  of  his  many  excellent  traits  of  character. 

Air.  Plummer  was  a  native  of  Michigan,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Ontona- 
gon in  i860.  His  parents  were  Daniel  and  Pauline  Plummer,  who  came  to  this 
county  after  the  Civil  war,  in  which  the  father  had  served  in  the  defense  of 
the  Union,  holding  the  rank  of  captain.  After  removing  to  this  state  the  parents 
Hved  in  Cedar  Falls  until  1894.  The  father  had  mining  interests  in  Colorado 
which  required  his  presence  in  that  state  a  part  of  the  time.  He  retired  some 
years  prior  to  his  death  and  spent  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment  of  the 
fruits  of  his  former  toil,  passing  away  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  also  occurred  the 
death  of  his  wife.     In  their  family  were  ten  children,  five  of  whom  are  yet  living. 

Charles  H.  Plummer  was  practically  a  lifelong  resident  of  Black  Hawk 
county,  being  a  little  lad  when  brought  to  Iowa  by  his  parents.  His  education 
was  acquired  in  the  schools  of  this  county,  for  he  supplemented  the  work  of 
the  grades  by  study  in  the  high  school  and  in  the  normal  school  at  Cedar  Falls. 
Before  his  marriage  he  was  identified  for  a  number  of  years  with  the  Yellow- 
stone Park  Transportation  Company  and  later  he  was  identified  with  Jiis  father 
in  silver  mining  in  Colorado.  For  ten  years  prior  to  his  death  he  was  inter- 
ested in  coal  lands  at  Monida,  Idaho,  and  while  developing  and  looking  after  his 
interests  there  he  met  with  an  accident  which  terminated  his  life  ten  years  later. 

The  capability  which  he  displayed  in  his  business  afl:'airs  and  his  recognized 
public  spirit  were  the  factors  which  led  to  his  selection  for  public  office.  In 
igo6  he  was  made  the  republican  nominee  for  the  office  of  recorder  of  Black 
Hawk  county  and  made  such  a  creditable  record  that  he  was  elected  again  and 
again  until  he  had  been  chosen  for  the  office  for  the  fourth  term  and  was  acting 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  297 

in  that  capacity  at  the  time  of  his  demise.  He  also  served  as  sergeant  at  arms 
in  the  lower  house  of  the  state  legislature  in  Colorado.  He  ever  regarded  a 
public  office  as  a  public  trust — and  no  trust  reposed  in  Charles  H.  Plummer  was 
ever  betrayed  in  the  slightest  degree. 

In  1892  Mr.  Plummer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  E.  Eiler,  a 
native  of  Waukesha,  Wisconsin,  and  a  daughter  of  Phillip  and  Fredericka 
Eiler,  who  came  to  Black  Hawk  county  in  1868.  Her  father  purchased  land, 
began  its  development  and  continued  to  follow  farming  until  he  retired  from 
active  business  life  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  his  remaining 
days  were  passed.  He  developed  and  at  one  time  owned  two  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  rich  and  arable  land  near  Cedar  Falls,  which  he  brought  to  a  high  state 
of  cultivation  and  to  which  he  added  many  modern  improvements  in  the  way 
of  good  buildings  and  farm  machinery.  His  death  occurred  in  1883,  while  his 
wife,  surviving  him  for  more  than  two  decades,  passed  away  in  1906.  They 
were  the  parents  of  six  children,  of  whom  three  are  yet  living:  George,  who  is 
now  a  resident  of  Appleton  City,  Missouri;  Daniel,  living  at  Ackley,  Iowa;  and 
Mrs.  Plummer.     Those  who  have  passed  away  are  Carrie,  Louise  and  Phillip. 

By  his  first  marriage  Charles  H.  Plummer  had  a  son,  Frank,  who  was  born 
in  1880.  By  the  second  marriage  there  were  born  two  sons :  Roger  W.,  whose 
birth  occurred  in  1899  and  who  is  now  attending  the  high  school;  and  Daniel  C, 
who  was  born  in  1904  and  is  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools. 

The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church 
and  excellent  traits  of  character  have  won  for  them  high  regard.  Mr.  Plummer 
was  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  of  the  American  Yeomen.  He 
died  in  the  year  1913,  while  filling  the  ofifiice  of  county  recorder,  and  his  wife 
was  appointed  to  fill  out  the  unexpired  term,  in  which  position  she  continued 
luitil  the  1st  of  January,  191 5.  Through  the  long  years  of  his  residence  in  this 
county  Mr.  Plummer  became  widely  known  and  his  many  substantial  qualities 
gained  for  him  the  high  regard,  confidence  and  goodwill  of  those  with  whom  he 
was  brought  in  contact.  In  all  of  his  business  career  he  was  never  known  to 
take  advantage  of  the  necessities  of  another  and  in  his  dealings  was  strictly 
fair  and  reliable.  In  office,  too,  he  displayed  the  same  spirit  of  fidelity  and  he 
was  numbered  among  those  citizens  who  at  departing  this  life  have  left  behind 
them  an  extensive  circle  of  warm  friends.  He  never  sought  to  figure  in  any 
spectacular  connection,  and  his  life  was  at  all  times  guided  by  high  and  manly 
principles,  his  course  being  one  which  at  no  time  sought  nor  required  disguise. 


J.  CECIL  BICKLEY,  M.  D. 

Dr.  J-  Cecil  Bickley  is  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  in 
Waterloo,  in  which  city  his  birth  occurred  in  1883,  he  being  a  son  of  the  veteran 
physician,  John  G.  Bickley.  Spending  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental 
roof,  he  began  his  education  at  the  usual  age  in  the  public  schools  and  passed 
through  consecutive  grades,  advancing  year  by  year  until  graduated  from  the 
East  Waterloo  high  school  with  the  class  of  1903.  Whether  inherited  tendency, 
natural  predilection  or  environment  had  most  to  do  with  shaping  his  choice  of  a 


298  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

career,  it  is  impossible  to  determine,  yet  when  we  regard  his  success  it  seems 
evident  that  nature  intended  him  for  the  calling  to  which  he  is  now  devoting  his 
life. 

Dr.  Bickley's  early  professional  training  was  received  in  Hahnemann  Medical 
College  of  Chicago,  in  which  he  was  a  student  for  two  years  and  later  he  entered 
the  New  York  University  Medical  School,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with 
the  M.  D.  degree  in  1907.  He  spent  a  year  and  a  half  in  the  New  York  Surgical 
Institute,  thus  gaining  broad  knowledge,  and,  splendidly  equipped  for  his  pro- 
fession, he  returned  to  Waterloo  and  became  associated  in  practice  with  his 
father  and  brother.  From  the  beginning  his  advancement  in  his  professional  career 
has  been  substantial  and  rapid.  He  went  abroad  and  attended  various  European 
clinics,  thus  having  opportunity  to  observe  the  advanced  methods  of  some  of 
the  most  eminent  physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  old  world.  On  returning  he 
resumed  practice  in  W'aterloo  and  he  is  now  attending  physician  to  both  of  the 
hospitals  of  this  city,  having  considerable  hospital  work  in  addition  to  his  gen- 
eral practice.  He  is  identified  wath  various  medical  organizations  including  the 
Waterloo,  Black  Hawk  County,  Austin  Flint,  Cedar  \'alley  and  Iowa  State 
Medical  Societies. 

In  June,  1908,  Dr.  Bickley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  OHie  French,  of 
Waterloo,  and  they  have  two  children,  John  Wallace  and  Kathryne  Evelyn.  Dr. 
Bickley  is  a  member  of  the  Christadelphian  church  of  Waterloo.  He  is  indeed 
a  well  known  citizen  here,  having  spent  his  entire  life  in  Black  Hawk  county 
save  for  periods  of  study  in  the  east  and  in  Europe.  There  were  qualities 
which  he  displayed  in  boyhood  which  even  then  won  him  the  friendship  of  the 
old  as  well  as  the  young,  and  throughout  his  entire  life  these  qualities  have 
dominated  his  career,  making  him  popular  with  his  fellow  townsmen,  while  his 
professional  success  has  come  to  him  as  the  just  reward  of  ability  and  merit. 


JOHN  LEMMER. 


John  Lemmer  has  been  identified  with  milling  interests  in  Cedar  Falls 
since  August,  1880,  and  is  now  serving  as  superintendent  of  the  mechanical 
department  of  the  Waterloo  &  Cedar  Falls  Union  Mill  Company,  a  position  for 
which  ability  and  experience  have  well  qualified  him.  He  was  born  in  Lee 
county,  Iowa,  October  5,  1858,  a  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Breiner)  Lemmer, 
the  former  a  native  of  Bavaria,  Germany,  and  the  latter  of  Alsace,  France.  In 
early  life  the  father  was  a  machinist.  He  came  to  America  in  the  early  '50s,  set- 
tling first  in  Chicago,  whence  a  removal  was  made  to  Iowa,  at  which  time  he 
took  up  his  abode  upon  a  farm  in  Lee  county.  After  devoting  a  period  to 
farming  he  removed  with  his  family  to  Keokuk  and  engaged  in  business  in  that 
city  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1864.  His  widow  survived  him  for  an 
extended  period,  passing  away  in  1888. 

They  were  the  parents  of  three  children,  of  whom  John  Lemmer  is  the 
eldest.  He  attended  the  schools  of  Keokuk  and  afterward  was  a  student  in  a 
parochial  school  at  West  Point,  Iowa.  On  leaving  the  southern  part  of  the 
state  in  1879,  when  twenty-one  years  of  age,  he  went  to  Pottawattamie  county, 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  299 

Iowa.  He  had  previously  learned  the  miller's  trade  and  for  a  brief  period  fol- 
lowed that  vocation  in  Pottawattamie  county.  He  was  afterward  engaged  in 
the  same  business  at  Nora  Springs,  Iowa,  where  he  continued  until  midwinter 
of  that  year  and  then  removed  to  Nashua.  He  followed  milling  in  that  place 
and  also  at  Fort  Madison,  Iowa,  prior  to  coming  to  Cedar  Falls  in  1880.  Here 
he  entered  the  employ  of  G.  N.  Miner  in  the  milling  business  and  remained  with 
him  until  he  sold  out  to  the  Cedar  Falls  Mill  Company,  with  which  he  was  con- 
nected until  1890.  The  business  was  then  merged  with  the  Cedar  Falls  Mill 
Company  and  Mr.  Lemmer  remained  in  the  employ  of  the  latter  organization 
until  1901,  when  the  Waterloo  &  Cedar  Falls  Union  Mill  Company  was  organ- 
ized. He  has  continued  with  the  last  named  to  the  present  and  is  now  occupying 
the  responsible  position  of  superintendent  of  the  mechanical  department.  He 
thoroughly  understands  the  latest  and  most  improved  methods  of  flour  pro- 
duction and  keeps  in  touch  with  the  advancement  that  is  continually  being  made 
in  the  process  of  manufacturing  flour.  He  devotes  his  entire  time  to  the  inter- 
ests of  the  company.  He  has  also  become  a  landowner  in  the  states  of  South 
Dakota  and  Oklahoma  and  his  investments  have  been  judiciously  made. 

On  the  22d  of  April,  1884,  Mr.  Lemmer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Foecke,  a  native  of  Lee  county,  Iowa,  and  a  daughter  of  Gerhardt  and 
Elizabeth  (Sanders)  Foecke,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Hanover,  Ger- 
many. The  father  came  to  the  new  world  when  a  young  man,  landing  at  New 
Orleans  and  making  his  way  up  the  Mississippi  river  to  Galena,  Illinois,  from 
which  point  he  walked  to  southern  Iowa,  at  which  time  there  was  but  one  log 
house  in  what  is  now  Cedar  Rapids.  He  became  a  landowner  and  spent  his 
remaining  days  in  Lee  county.  He  was  married  in  this  state  and  always  fol- 
lowed farming  as  a  life  work.  He  died  in  the  year  1894,  while  his  wife  sur- 
vived until  1910.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lemmer  have  become  the  parents  of  five  chil- 
dren:  Mary  Frances;  John  G.,  who  is  employed  by  the  International  Harvester 
Company;  Lizzie,  who  is  in  the  employ  of  the  Cedar  Falls  National  Bank;  Carl, 
who  is  with  the  Bancroft  Greenhouse  Company;  and  Robert  G.,  who  is  with 
the  Chapman  Lumber  Company  of  Waterloo. 

Mr.  Lemmer  holds  membership  in  the  Roman  Catholic  church  and  in  that 
faith  has  reared  his  family.  Fle  is  well  known  in  Cedar  Falls,  where  for  more 
than  a  third  of  a  century  he  has  made  his  home,  his  activities  winning  him  recog- 
nition as  one  of  the  leading  representatives  of  industrial  interests  in  his  city. 


H.  B.  LICHTY. 


Waterloo  owes  much  to  the  efforts  of  H.  B.  Lichty,  who  has  various  con- 
nections with  important  business  concerns  of  the  city,  being  president  of  the 
Waterloo  Cement  Machinery  Corporation  and  president  of  the  Black  Hawk 
Manufacturing  Company.  His  plans  are  ever  well  formulated  and  carefully 
executed  and  his  energy  and  determination  have  carried  him  into  important 
relations.  W^aterloo  numbers  him  among  her  native  sons.  His  father,  Lewis 
Lichty,  came  to  this  city  about  1864  or  1865  and  was  prominently  identified  with 
business  interests  here.     He  was  also  mayor  of  the  city  for  a  number  of  years 


300  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

and  thus  aided  in  shaping  the  public  poHcy.  Said  one  who  knew  him  well. 
"His  word  was  as  good  as  his  bond;  he  was  the  soul  of  honor  and  the  better 
one  knew  him,  the  greater  the  respect  and  the  warmer  the  friendship." 

H.  B.  Lichty  was  reared  and  educated  in  Waterloo  and  also  was  for  some 
time  a  student  in  the  State  University  of  Iowa.  He  made  his  initial  step  in  the 
business  world  in  connection  with  the  real-estate  and  abstract  business  and  is 
still  a  member  of  the  Sedgwick-Lichty  Abstract  Company  of  W^aterloo.  He 
laid  out  the  Highland  addition  to  the  city  under  the  name  of  the  Highland 
Improvement  Company,  which  he  organized,  and  through  his  real-estate  activi- 
ties has  contributed  much  to  the  development  and  improvement  of  the  city. 
He  is  now  concentrating  his  efforts  largely  upon  the  management  and  interests 
of  the  Waterloo  Cement  Machinery  Corporation  and  the  Black  Hawk  Manu- 
facturing Company.  The  former  was  organized  and  incorporated  in  January. 
1909,  with  an  authorized  capital  stock  of  fifty  thousand  dollars.  Something 
of  the  steady  and  substantial  growth  of  the  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact 
that  the  authorized  capital  stock  at  the  present  time  is  two  hundred  thousand 
dollars,  of  which  one  hundred  and  seventy-five  thousand  dollars  has  been  paid 
up,  and  the  business  for  1914  was  fifteen  times  that  of  1909.  This  company 
was  organized  by  Mr.  Lichty,  who  still  remains  as  president,  with  L.  H.  Weide- 
man  vice  president,  L.  A.  Kliebenstein  as  secretary  and  S.  J.  Hall  as  treasurer. 
The  principal  product  of  the  plant  is  c^oncrete  mixers  and  they  also  manufacture 
builders'  hoist  and  material  elevators.  Their  factory  is  at  the  corner  of  A-inton 
and  Glenwood  streets  and  they  have  in  their  employ  about  one  hundred  men, 
while  throughout  the  United  States  they  are  represented  by  many  local  agents' 
The  business  has  grown  along  substantial  lines  and  has  now  reached  extensive 
and  gratifying  proportions,  the  annual  sale  of  the  output  bringing  to  them  a  very 
desirable  financial  return. 

In  1893  Mr.  Lichty  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  M.  Buren,  of 
Missouri,  and  they  have  one  son,  Wilbur  Lewis.  Mr.  Lichty  holds  membership 
with  the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the 
Commercial  Club  and  Board  of  Trade.  He  has  many  sterling  qualities  which 
have  won  for  him  high  regard.  His  life  record  is  an  indication  of  the  fact 
that  the  sources  of  our  power  lie  within  ourselves.  His  ability  and  business 
talent  have  developed  with  the  passing  years  and  he  is  today  one  of  those  who 
IS  ready  to  meet  any  emergency  with  the  consciousness  of  personal  strength 
that  comes  from  a  right  conception  of  things  and  an  habitual  regard  for  what 
is  best  in  the  exercise  of  human  activities. 


FRANK  T.  HARTMAN,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Frank  T.  Hartman,  one  of  the  leading  physicians  of  Waterloo  con- 
scientious in  the  performance  of  all  his  professional  duties  and  splendidly 
equipped  by  preliminary  study  and  wide  reading  for  the  onerous  work  which 
devolves  upon  him,  was  born  in  Jones  county,  Iowa,  in  1870.  and  in  the  acquire- 
ment of  his  education  supplemented  a  district  school  course  by  study  in  the 
Upper   Iowa   University  and   in   a  commercial   college.     Desiring  to   become   a 


HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY  301 

member  of  the  medical  profession,  he  entered  the  Rush  Medical  College  of 
Chicago,  wherein  he  completed  his  course  with  the  class  of  1897.  Removing 
to  southern  Texas,  he  spent  one  year  in  that  state  and  then  came  to  Waterloo, 
where  he  has  since  practiced.  Ambitious  to  attain  the  highest  degree  of  efficiency 
in  his  chosen  life  work,  he  has  attended  the  New  York  Post-Graduate  College 
and  has  also  by  wide  reading  and  investigation  added  largely  to  his  knowledge. 
In  the  summer  of  1914  he  went  abroad  and  had  unusual  experiences,  being  in 
Berlin  when  the  war  broke  out.  He  witnessed  the  mobilization  of  the  German 
army,  having  the  opportunity  of  seeing  all  of  the  head  officers  of  the  army  and 
navy  and  many  representatives  of  the  nobility.  He  reports,  too,  that  he  was 
treated  with  every  courtesy  by  the  German  government  and  people  and  had  few 
discomforts  in  making  his  way  out  of  the  country  in  preparation  for  the  return 
voyage  to  America. 

In  1904  Dr.  Hartman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Effie  E.  MacMillan,  of 
Des  Moines,  Iowa.  They  hold  membership  in  the  Grace  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  Dr.  Hartman  is  also  a  member  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Asso- 
ciation. They  are  well  known  socially  and  the  hospitality  of  Waterloo's  best 
homes  is  cordially  extended  them.  Dr.  Hartman  is  actively  connected  with  two 
fraternities,  the  Masons  and  with  Helmet  Lodge,  K.  P.,  while  along  strictly 
professional  lines  his  membership  is  in  the  Waterloo  Medical  Society,  the  Black 
Hawk  County  Medical  Society,  the  Iowa  State  Medical  Society,  the  American 
Medical  Association  and  the  Clinical  Congress  of  Surgeons  of  North  America. 
Thus  he  keeps  in  touch  with  the  most  advanced  thought  of  the  profession  and 
in  his  practice  employs  modern  scientific  methods. 


HARRY  B.  TURNIPSEED. 

Harry  B.  Turnipseed,  an  attorney  at  law  practicing  at  Cedar  Falls  as  a 
member  of  the  firm  of  Martin  &  Turnipseed,  is  a  worthy  representative  of  that 
profession  to  which  property,  life  and  liberty  .must  look  for  protection.  He  is 
well  versed  in  the  science  of  jurisprudence  and.  with  ability  to  accurately  apply 
its  principles,  he  has  made  for  himself  a  creditable  name  in  professional  circles, 
while  his  devotion  to  his  clients'  interests  has  become  proverbial.  He  was  born 
in  Wellman,  Washington  county,  Iowa,  on  the  4th  of  June,  1888,  a  son  of  Isaac 
N.  and  Mary  Belle  (McBride)  Turnipseed,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Jowa,  the  former  born  in  Washington  county  and  the  latter  in  Keokuk  county. 
The  father  spent  his  active  life  in  the  mercantile  business,  opening  one  of  the 
iirst  stores  in  Wellman,  after  which  he  was  closely  identified  with  the  commercial 
interests  of  that  town  for  thirty  years.  He  still  resides  there  but  is  now  living 
retired,  enjoying  a  rest  which  he  has  truly  earned  and  richly  deserves. 

Harry  B.  Turnipseed  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
town  and  passed  through  consecutive  grades  until  he  reached  the  high  school. 
Later  he  attended  the  University  of  Iowa  during  the  years  from  1905  to  1910 
and  by  gaining  a  liberal  education  became  well  qualified  for  life's  practical  and 
responsible  duties.  He  was  engaged  in  teaching  for  five  years  and  it  was  during 
that  time  that  he  devoted  the  vacation  periods  to  work  in  the  liberal  arts  college 


302  HISTORY  OF  BLACK  HAWK  COUNTY 

in  the  Iowa  State  University,  completing  in  that  manner  what  was  practically 
a  three  years'  course.  While  engaged  in  teaching  he  served  as  principal  of  the 
schools  of  Orchard,  Iowa,  for  a  time  and  later  was  made  superintendent  of  the 
schools  at  Keswick,  Iowa,  while  still  later  he  was  school  superintendent  at  Ute, 
Iowa.  In  1910  he  returned  to  the  state  university  and  entered  upon  his  law 
course,  being  graduated  from  the  law  department  with  the  class  of  191 3,  at 
which  time  the  LL.  B.  degree  was  conferred  upon  him.  While  engaged  in  pur- 
suing his  law  studies  in  1912  and  1913  he  was  president  of  the  Resh  chapter  of 
the  Acacia  fraternity,  an  organization  of  college  Masons. 

After  his  admission  to  the  bar  Mr.  Turnipseed  came  to  Cedar  Falls  on  the 
23d  of  July,  1 91 3,  and  entered  the  law  office  of  Hemenway  &  Martin.  On  the 
1st  of  October  of  the  sa